Investing in precious metals 101

Where To Live In The United States?

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Viewing 10 posts - 21 through 30 (of 31 total)
  • Sat, Mar 12, 2016 - 08:36am

    #21
    skipr

    skipr

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 09 2016

    Posts: 128

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    NO CAR LIVING

I do not have an automobile and live alone, so my relocation options are restricted.  I presently live in Tucson AZ and desperately want to move to a cooler, cloudier, and wetter region.  The summer heat and burning sun absolutely kills me, and the 15 year drought is only going to get worst.  The public transportation system in Portland OR is very good, but the area is way too big for me.  The CA drought is also marching north, so the area doesn't have any good long term potential.  Some friends have told me about the Puget Sound area around Port Angeles and Port Townsend.  I hope to get some first hand knowledge of that area's transportation systems and "walkability" soon.  The yearly temperature swings there are probably the most comfortable, but it is also in the shadow of the Olympics, so water could eventually become a problem there too.  Being a 4 season guy I really like living in Boston in the 80s, so I'm also considering New England, especially Burlington VT.  Drought is not a problem up there, at least not yet, and Burlington has a good bus system.  It would also be nice to live in a university town.  Tucson has the UofA (not an option) and Burlington has the UofV.  I have also looked into Canada.  An accountant told me that a US citizen could not own property up there.  Is that true?

What can all of you PP types tell me about these choices?

  • Sat, Mar 12, 2016 - 06:24pm

    #22

    Sam Mittelstaedt

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    skipr wrote:The public

[quote=skipr]The public transportation system in Portland OR is very good, but the area is way too big for me.  The CA drought is also marching north, so the area doesn't have any good long term potential.  Some friends have told me about the Puget Sound area around Port Angeles and Port Townsend.  I hope to get some first hand knowledge of that area's transportation systems and "walkability" soon.  The yearly temperature swings there are probably the most comfortable, but it is also in the shadow of the Olympics, so water could eventually become a problem there too.[/quote]

I suggest checking out Bellingham, WA
+ College town (Western Washington University)
+ Fairly comprehensive bus system
+ Costco and other shopping are bus-accessible
+ Activities are also accessible via public transit.
+ On the water rarely gets snow, but does get cold air from the Strait of Juan De Fuca
+ Small international airport provides easy access to the rest of the country without waiting in lines.
+ Beautiful area, people tend to be nice.
+ Regional Amtrack commuter train can take you to Vancouver BC and Seattle with connecting trains to Portland and points South or East.

  • Thu, May 18, 2017 - 07:52pm

    #23
    Anna Bee

    Anna Bee

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    Joined: May 18 2017

    Posts: 1

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    Idaho

Hey there Sirocco,

This reply is about 4 years late, but hopefully you'll get this message and reply. I really enjoyed reading your comment on relocation, and completely agree that the best place to live varies from person to person. A bit about myself: I'm 24, single, still in school here in my home state of Massachusetts. I'm planning on moving out west after I graduate nursing school. Are there any jobs in healthcare, would you say, in Idaho for example? Out of Idaho, Washington, and Oregon, which state is more libertarian in your opinion?

I was also wondering about culture in Idaho, and race relations. You mentioned that the Aryan Nation is based out of Sandpoint, ID, does that mean there is a lot of racism in that area? My main issue with moving out in the country is potential backlash I would get from people who discriminate people of color. I'm Hispanic, btw. 

I'm conservative politically, but I come from a very liberal area, one that is very accepting of racial minorities, although I recognize liberal areas are expensive, populated, and restrictive with gun rights, etc.

Any tips would be appreciated. Anyone else reading this is free to reply of course!

Thanks!

Anna

 

 

  • Thu, May 18, 2017 - 09:10pm

    #24

    Sam Mittelstaedt

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    The one industry that will

The one industry that will continue to grow for a while is healthcare so you should be able to find a healthcare job just about anywhere you go if you're willing to put in your time doing some grunt work. Boise would be the place to start in my opinion because it's a small town disguised as a metro area with a major airport, Costco, etc. South of Boise is dry range and farmland. North of Boise is where the forests, rivers, mountains and other awesome outdoor stuff beings. It's also fairly low elevation and it has 280-300 days of sunshine.

I believe the Northern ID racism is very isolated. In general, people discriminate against people who are jerks or feel like the world owes them something. As long as you're nice/polite and determined to make your own way in life, you should be good to go. In general, the PNW has no cultural bigotry because the American version of history only goes back a 150 years. There are not generations of people who grew up being taught others were less than them.

I believe most people in Idaho are good people who are friendly and generally willing to look out for their neighbors. If you're Conservative and don't push to dismantle traditional values and institutions, you should feel right at home in Idaho. In addition, there is a fairly substantial Hispanic population in the Pacific NW.

As a whole, Idaho is by far the most liberty minded of the three. Basically, once you get East of the Cascade mountains most people lean more Libertarian/Conservative. WA and OR get a bad reputation because of the liberal governments and liberal big cities on the West sides of the two states. That being said, the big government libs in WA/OR is like a cancer in those states, so you might as well start in Idaho where you have the best chance to living a life with less government intrusion into your life.

Idaho Forum @ http://walkingtofreedom.com/forum/index.php?board=20.0

  • Thu, May 18, 2017 - 09:11pm

    #25

    Sam Mittelstaedt

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    More specific discussion

More specific discussion regarding race relations.
http://walkingtofreedom.com/forum/index.php?topic=495.0

  • Thu, May 18, 2017 - 09:21pm

    #26
    Steven R

    Steven R

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    idaho rocks

relocated from so cal to idaho…been all through the interior northwest…. 

if you cherish liberty…oregon and washington are NOT the place…

if you want detailed answers to detailed questions pm me…

regardless…success and blessings on all your endeavors 

  • Fri, May 19, 2017 - 07:22pm

    #27
    skipr

    skipr

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 09 2016

    Posts: 128

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    traveling nurse

Hi there countrygirl92,

Did you ever consider becoming a traveling nurse?  About 20 years ago when I was vacationing in Alaska I met a woman who was finishing up her nursing job there and was moving down to Australia next.  It sounded like a lot of fun.  I wonder if it is still possible in this radically different economic and environmental climate.

skipr

  • Thu, Sep 28, 2017 - 03:16pm

    #28
    Justin R

    Justin R

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    Help evaluating Bug Out Locations (considerng Texas,Oregon,Utah

Background:
I live on Long Island in NY. It is quite pricey living here and will probably eventually be submerged at some point (I can't afford 10 acres and if I did my Great Grandkids probably couldn't live on it). My family is either in Los Angeles, Las Vegas or NY so I will probably be somewhat separated from most of them.

Goal:
To find some place to retire to that meets these criteria
1) clean air
2) away from the ocean
3) reasonably low home prices
4) low property taxes: less than 2k/year
5) mild winters: less than 7 inches of snow
6) Decent rainfall: > 12 inches/year
7) Culture fit
8 ) No horrible unavoidable environmental risks (no wildfires. I might be able to get a monolithic dome or something to deal with earthquakes or hurricanes/tornadoes, but living on a fault seems too risky as well)

Problem:
I need to be part of a community but have a hard time determining culture fit.

I technically Jewish which makes most of the country that has mild enough winters, without being on the coast seem too racist/risky.
I realize that I am getting a biased, sensationalized view but without actually living some place it is hard to tell how tolerant it is.
Another problem is fitting in at a religious area. For example, my favorite potential location is in the St. George area of Utah.
However, people there self report as highly religious. As both a non-mormon and a non-church goer I wonder how isolated I would be there.

Help Request:
I am looking at the Albany area of Oregon, NorthEast of Texas (Marion in particular), or St. George area of Utah.
Does anyone have any experience with these areas? Does anyone have any other recommendations?
Can I anyone recommend any way to evaluate the culture of an area from afar. I've been reading comments on Sperling's best, but that is less useful for the lower population areas I've been looking at. I also look at meetup.com for meetups in the area.
 

  • Thu, Sep 28, 2017 - 05:12pm

    #29

    Rector

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 07 2010

    Posts: 330

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    Texas

If you want to survive.

Rector

  • Thu, Sep 28, 2017 - 10:39pm

    #30
    Uncletommy

    Uncletommy

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    Joined: May 03 2014

    Posts: 524

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    Broaden your horizons, schlemiel

Other than the winters, Saskatchewan seems to meet most of your requirements. Population growth rate is 1.4% per year, easy to get into (just claim refugee status) . As the locals around here say, "It's a great place to be from!". If you want to be left alone, but have an occasional craving for a Kosher sandwich, try Saskatoon (a university town). Every time I drive through the province, I feel like I'm one of the cast members of Fiddle on the Roof.:

http://www.jewishsask.com/

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