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Where To Live In The United States?

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  • Wed, Jan 16, 2013 - 05:07pm

    #1
    jcat3022

    jcat3022

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    Where To Live In The United States?

This is a question I continue to ask myself as a resident of an over-reaching, over-taxing & over-regulating state (Maryland). For me, as independant thinking individual who values family, freedom & liberty above all, I find a vast majority of the population & its “leaders” above the mason-dixon line nauseating & economically inept. Like most on this site, I feel as though the writing is on the wall and the last thing I’d want is to paint myself and family in a corner where we have zero options. Ideally I’d love to sell the house, pack up our stuff and move to a place where the ideas learned on this website & forum can be best practiced. Obviously life is not that simple and complexities such as money, work, property, etc. come into play. Having said that, my wife and I are doing everything we can to deleverage from debt & save as much money as possible via precious metals & other tangible investments. If we were to sell our home I’d be debt free and have liquid assets of around $75k. She would still have $50k of student loans and $150k mortgage on her rental property. She has her masters degree in Speech Therapy and could work pretty much anywhere. I have a 5% ownership stake in a 30+ person business that averages $4.5 million a year in sales with the majority partners having no plans to sell in the next 5 years. The idea of leaving doesn’t scare me, nor does taking a job with a 50% paycut. I’ve been there before, started a sales territory from nothing and built it to a million dollar + territory from sheer work and grit.
I’m not leaving the country, this is where I’m from and where my family and relatives live. So, the question is where to? Where can I take my family in the United States that will allow us to live a sustainable lifestyle without the worry of our freedoms being fully eroded and the government interefering with us.

  • Sat, Sep 28, 2013 - 03:20pm

    #2

    billhopen

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    population graph needs a latitude graph on the y axis

My Central West Virginia mountain home is close to population longitudes of NYC, Miami, Atlanta, Havana etc. (all hundreds of miles away by latitude), and in mountains we are "upstream" in terms of water flow.   This county is 60 miles across but there are 14,000 people,  clean-enough-to-drink lakes, rivers, abound as do farm-lets, and small towns with still viable small urban infrastructure that has been depopulated since the 1880—1940's build up.   Want to buy a small town 15,000 sq ft brick 3 floor building on main street for well under 100k?   come here.   Taxes?   I have 10,000 sq ft under roof (including my 4000sqft home on 3 acres) and pay under$1000 per year property taxes(including 4 vehicles).  Water? a river runs through it, a huge lake you can snorkle in 1/2 mile upstream.(also provides flood control)   My city has 1000 people  (used to have 6 times that pop).   I'm from NYC.

The surrounding rural land has lots of little 100 acre forest hillside/meadow bottom farms, surrounding town and  pretty far away from any nuclear reactors.  Basically a  rain forest with a mild winter,   I'm a sculptor selling to national market, so my income is not dependent on the local very small population.  Feel happy and safe here, but need more urban refugees to rebuild, repopulate, rejuvinate the town and culture.   Cheap to buy in here now, and do what ever you want in lots of space….OTOH, if you are loaded, maybe you can buy a $500,000  home in Asheville and be happy.   Here you get a chance to build your own culture, in Asheville, it comes ready-made

  • Sat, Sep 28, 2013 - 05:41pm

    #3

    James McKenzie

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    refuge

Move to Canada.  We have our problems,  but not on anywhere near the scale of America's.

My family resides in small town British Columbia.  The air is clean, lots of clean lakes and rivers,  but most important….it is SAFE.  Crime in Canada is different than crime in America.  Canada is kinder, gentler….kinda the way America was 50 years ago.  Our government and banking system is sound, as is our currency.  Granted when America goes down the effects on Canada will be catastrophic.  But our system of government is sound.  Most Canadians are content with governance.  We have very few guns.

Most guns are in the hands of the military (which is small), or the police.  We live within 200 kms of a major metropolitan center,  which of course has its drug problems.  But avoid drugs and ylu will avoid most of the crime.  Most crime in Canada is drug related.   Move North !!

 

Yours Truly Jaysmiley

  • Sat, Sep 28, 2013 - 05:42pm

    #4

    James McKenzie

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    refuge

Move to Canada.  We have our problems,  but not on anywhere near the scale of America's.

My family resides in small town British Columbia.  The air is clean, lots of clean lakes and rivers,  but most important….it is SAFE.  Crime in Canada is different than crime in America.  Canada is kinder, gentler….kinda the way America was 50 years ago.  Our government and banking system is sound, as is our currency.  Granted when America goes down the effects on Canada will be catastrophic.  But our system of government is sound.  Most Canadians are content with governance.  We have very few guns.

Most guns are in the hands of the military (which is small), or the police.  We live within 200 kms of a major metropolitan center,  which of course has its drug problems.  But avoid drugs and ylu will avoid most of the crime.  Most crime in Canada is drug related.   Move North !!

 

Yours Truly Jaysmiley

  • Sat, Sep 28, 2013 - 07:53pm

    #5

    mumusha

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    Fukushima

Should another earthquake hit the Fukushima area, or as likely, a simple mistake to a highly complicated and dangerous operation (to dismantle the spent fuel rods in damaged Bldg. 4) occur, this following blog post says to "move to the Southern Hemisphere".  

http://www.washingtonsblog.com/2013/09/the-real-fukushima-danger.html 

I feel this nuclear issue dwarfs the problem of the 3 E's. I REALLY hope the world can intervene and take this dangerous procedure out of the hands of TEPCO and make it an international issue. Because it is.  

 

  • Mon, Nov 04, 2013 - 05:34pm

    #6
    sowhatareyousaying

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    considering relocation in light of Fukushima

Thank you, Mumusha, for what I think might be the first post bringing this up.  As much as I have dug up online about how dire this is and what a pivotal moment we are at – starting in a week or two! – I am mystified as to why I can find nothing on PP. 

If we have no control over how this unit 4 pool decomissioning goes, at least we can find out how to minimize exposure via diet, supplements, and exposure to the environment when the levels are high.  Making stupid mistakes in the coming months will be disastrous –  and unnecessary if you are prepared with knowledge to protect yourself and your family.

I've seen a lot of discussion where people get on to vehemently argue that there is no radioactive threat to worry about, and of course they are very welcome to their opinion, but I don't want to have my time wasted by people who don't share my concern and desire to be prudent.  If it turns out that we are to avoid a bad outcome, nobody will be happier than me.  But if this operation goes bad and I need a geiger counter to see if I should ride my bike today, or KI, zeolite, pectin, etc. and the shelves are empty because I waited too long, that would reflect poor planning, no?  I see no harm in throwing a little money at it now, just in case. 

So, could we have some discussion on this issue before I hit the buy button on amazon? 

Also, I'm thinking maybe the West coast isn't the place for me to settle, though I've been here all my life and it's my home.  Lots of issues with a short time frame!  Could somebody smarter than me start a thread or refer me to one that I just couldn't find?

Many thanks to all you brilliant minds out there on PP!

  • Tue, Nov 05, 2013 - 07:21pm

    #7

    mumusha

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    Fukushima

The scary thing is that radiation is invisible and the effects (besides the obvious melt down) are too obscure, takes too long to surface, too. One can't prove the cause if one dies of cancer years later. For this reason, I don't imagine shelves being empty from people buying up iodine and geiger counters, unless there's a nuclear bomb attack or something as dramatic.

Same reason people aren't getting on their feet to prepare for an economic crash, 'cuz it's happening too slow, too gradual, like a "slow train wreck" as a PPer said. People won't wake up unless there's a big bang.

Regarding living on the West Coast, I share your concern. For this reason I feel living on the Eastern side of the Cascades is better, if you can acquire ample ground water for your farm / food. Most nuclear facilities in the US are East of the Mississippi. (I'm leaning towards Klamath Falls OR, or Coeur D'Arlene ID, although I haven't visited these places and so don't know just yet. 

Here are other links:

http://fukushima-diary.com/category/dnews/

http://truth-out.org/news/item/19073-risky-repair-of-fukushima-could-spill-15000-times-the-radiation-of-hiroshima-create-85-chernobyls

  • Wed, Nov 06, 2013 - 12:37am

    #8
    jdye51

    jdye51

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    Rod Removal

Enenews.com says that the removal of the rods has been postponed for at least two weeks – the stated concerns are legal and political. I feel a bit of relief but only temporarily because at some point the rods will have to be removed. It would be a little more reassuring if it wasn't Tepco doing it.

  • Wed, Nov 06, 2013 - 11:02am

    #9
    jgritter

    jgritter

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    City People Are Screwed

That being said, is there a way to match up urban PPers with rural PPers to there mutual benefit?  I understand that many people want to be circumspect about their preps and that we may be an introvered and standoffish group by nature, but it seems like, with lives at stake, we could come up with something.

John G

  • Wed, Dec 23, 2015 - 08:28am

    #10

    Poet

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    Scientists on where to relocate in the 21st century

Several scientists researched and authored a paper on the best places to relocate to for the 21st century from a sustainability standpoint.

The paper is titled "Sustainability and place: How emerging mega-trends of the 21st century will affect humans and nature at the landscape level".

Below is a link to a page with excepts, as well as a link to the full paper.
 
"Five scientists have written a peer-reviewed article about where the best and worst places will be in the future in America based on how sustainable a region is when you take into account climate change, energy reserves, population, sea-level rise, increasingly strong hurricanes, and other factors.  Three of the scientists, John W. Day, David Pimentel, and Charles Hall, are 'rock stars' in  ecology."

http://energyskeptic.com/2014/scientists-on-where-to-be-in-in-the-future/

Poet

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