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What seniors can reasonably do

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  • Tue, Sep 17, 2013 - 07:08pm

    #21

    Arthur Robey

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    And Here is your Serious Answer.

 

And 

 

Serious scholars can find much more where that comes from.

If world leaders did ayahuaska the world would change.

  • Tue, Sep 17, 2013 - 08:22pm

    #22
    sdmptww

    sdmptww

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    Full of hubris, arrogrance and short-sightedness

Humans with all our awareness and consciousness are also arrogrant and short-sighted.  We are into short-term and convenience, ours not any other creatures.  As far as I'm concerned nuclear power built in earthquake areas and along the Pacific coast where tsunamis are not an unknown event is without a doubt one of the dumbest things we've done as a species.  If we want to talk about a mess we are leaving our descendents, the whole nuclear grab bag is a beaut.  I have used the analogy of cancer a number of times in discussing the way humans insist on living on this wonderful gift called earth.

My understanding is some radiation has already reached the west coast though what we have been told is it wasn't a level of concern.  I've given up the fish and the CA vegetables from the area, not that I ate much of the vegetables before hand but I do miss the fish.  I think folks on the west coast need to get as much info that is absent either a Japanese slant or a western media slant and try to start making some decisions about possibilities and best responses given their circumstances.  Keep ears open for thyroid problems and rises in cancer rates.  I really don't see the upcoming effort coming out any better than all the other bungles for the past two years.  The amount of radiated water they are trying to store alone is a problem should another earthquake occur and heaven knows there is no place to put it that isn't earthquake prone.  I too feel sorry for the Japanese.  One of my best friends is part Japanese and this is just worrying her mother to death.  In terms of water.  Folks on the west coast should determine where their water is coming from.  Surface water could become contaminated.  Ground water would be less of a problem.  Most water processing allows water to sit out in open tanks as it is chlorinated and cleaned.  Power plants melt down, they aren't bombs.  Contamination of the Pacific is a given.  It already is and will get worse.  But there will be radiation in the air if they fail with this upcoming effort.

I am a believer in BOBs.  I don't want anyone to think I think they are a waste of time.  I just find that some folks who work at being prepared put way too much into BOBs, guns and leaving civilization when things get bad.  I just don't feel that is a response that most should consider or would find reasonable and it requires experience most folks don't have.  I also shifts the brain from thinking about resilience and creating a better recovery from whatever might happen to survival.  I want my family and community to thrive after the dust settles, not just survive.  If I lived in a metro area with multiple man-made technological accident possibilities my BOB would be sitting by the door loaded and ready like it was when I lived in Houston.  Nowadays it is in the closet and doesn't get checked as often but it is still ready.

I too saw Japan won the Olympics bid and found that to be another fine example of short-sighted stupidity.

Joyce, I'm pretty sure NC is a voluntary evac state.  It has been a while since I interacted with anyone from NC in emergency management, and it could have changed, but I doubt it.  The south tends to voluntary evacuation but some areas do make you sign that you understand you are on your own if you don't leave.  You might contact your local emergency management office, probably county unless you are in a metro area.  They should be able to tell you about evacuation and what risks they believe are possibilities that they plan for.

  • Tue, Sep 17, 2013 - 11:57pm

    #23
    liz cowen

    liz cowen

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    fukashima

at first i filled 100 sandbags of pre fuk sand and it' stored in my garage to put on the main floor over an area i would inhabit a few feet past my fallout area. i watched  the weather patterns(which i do alot anyway) and tracked the fallout. in the beginning  alot went north into canada,,,,ok then i read about cesium an d decided to get collard green seeds to grow in my soil. the collards would uptake calcium out of the soil or in this case cesium. then i thought about covering a section of my garden so the compost could be scraped off. then i thought i won't be out when it rains and i won't eat the snow like our teachers told us back in th 50-60's. then i thought i won't track in any dirt (a big ha ha there) and i will take a shower each night when i come in and wash it off. i stopped eating anything from california and colorado and texas. and i never have eaten fish or anything from the water. my thryoid trashed in 1986 and i suspect from chernobyl…i was outdoors alot that spring.and summeri got to the point where i couldn't keep up and fear laden as i was, i was aging and couldn't keep up with solutions and ideas..2 months after fukashima i figured out i was pushing a boulder up a hill. and i resumed lifelet go the worry and accepted an early, premature death was in slate for me. whatever…i let it all go.

i grew up in a prestigious neighborhood in se michigan on a chain of lakes. turns out all the byproducts from the chroming industry for autos had  a huge toxic dump up the chain. the residents of this neighborhood kept mum to keep the property values up. 100% yes that is correct, 100% of the houses had an incident of cancer. young people moving in died within 3 years of moving there…the undertaker finally made enough money to move into the neighborhood and they were both dead within 5 years..both my parents had cancer….my mother had stage 4 ovairan cancer in 1976. she is now 85 and my father 87.

my take away is some people have good genes and are resistant to cancer and others don't. the other conclusion is the water we consume.i distill mine and i'm working on a simple filter idea….if everything stops we may need to come up with a new set of kosher…which makes me wonder if pigs hold more crap in their meat that other meats and shell fish too?(i'll just leave out all the implications that statement means) 

some of us will survive to old age. some won't. at 60 i think i already have– by historical standards.i still have my teeth too.

so i spend my time getting a place set up here.

it's good to know what's going on as long as it doesn't derail me.as we get older, our metabolisms slow down…the elders in japan offered to do clean up work at fukashima. could we do the same? i won't.i, not a hero. but as i've said in other posts, i hope to be leaving behind a place where life can be maintained. stress, worry, can kill just as many people as cesium can.

i think we have to adopt a resilent attitude and to go til we don't type thinking and trash the omg one.and of course do what ever else makes sense.

 

  • Wed, Sep 18, 2013 - 12:17am

    #24
    liz cowen

    liz cowen

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    aging is suppose to use the

aging is suppose to use the letting go that aging naturally brings to bring and pass on wisdom to those younger than us, to help them survive, to not make the same mistakes and to have some perspective  of the long term of human folly and survival.

the elders of the past told stories. some were recorded. some passed down for centuries by word of mouth

the boomer generation….what are we passing on.?

  • Wed, Sep 18, 2013 - 01:25am

    #25
    jdye51

    jdye51

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    Dangerous Times

The Man-yi typhoon hit Japan and has moved out to sea. It dumped a whole lot of water onto the Fukushima area. I saw a news item that they released 1000 tons of water into the sea under the classification "rainwater".  Might they also have used this situation to release some of the water in the storage tanks that are leaking? I just don't trust TEPCO. They lied about the 300 tons/day going into the Pacific over the past two years. So far, there hasn't been anything on wind damage to the reactor buildings. Man-yi was a Category 1. What if a more energetic typhoon should hit or a 6.0 or higher earthquake, both things are quite possible.

Atmospheric nuclear tests released plenty of radionuclides into the air before they were banned. Countries dumped defunct nuclear reactors and other material into the oceans before that was banned (did you know about that?). Now radioactivity is being continually released into the Pacific ocean. We have a history of using the planet as a dumping ground for our detritus. This includes all the cases of corporate dumping of waste materials as well. I read somewhere that half the rivers in China are gone and the rest are polluted. How does any of this make sense? Who is it that thought it was an OK idea? To use the cancer analogy, the mutant cells are releasing toxins that will help kill the host.

I bought the book "Nuclear Roulette: The True Story About the Most Dangerous Energy Source on Earth" by Gar Smith but haven't read it yet. I suspect it will be depressing and alarming to read. It's in my stack of other books on Permaculture, composting and edible landscaping that are more uplifting. But with all that is going on in Japan, I think I'll move it to the top of the stack. In a moment of fear over Syria, I bought another book, "Nuclear War Survival Skills" by Cresson H. Kearny. I haven't read that yet either. Glancing through it just now, there is something about the prevention of thyroid damage and fallout shelters. Maybe I should read it first! Not to scare myself but to learn more about the dangers and what it's possible to do.

Many people would scoff at such concerns (they would about the 3 E's too). But take a good look around you at the world. Nuclear, chemical and biological weaponry. Increasing tensions over scarce resources. Is it such a big leap of imagination to think someone will eventually use the bomb? Or that a spent rod will slip and hit another one sparking a fire that releases large amounts of radionuclides into the air? We do seem to be set on killing ourselves off, don't we?

Prep and pray, prep and pray.

Joyce

 

 

 

  • Wed, Sep 18, 2013 - 02:24am

    #26
    jdye51

    jdye51

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    Tuna

Here is an article on the bluefin tuna caught off California in 2011

http://intellihub.com/2013/05/29/absolutely-every-one-bluefin-tuna-tested-in-california-waters-contaminated-with-fukushima-radiation/

  • Wed, Sep 18, 2013 - 08:04pm

    #27
    jdye51

    jdye51

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    Posts: 151

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    Sirocco

Check out this short article:

http://enenews.com/gundersen-theyve-admitted-all-boron-disintegrated-between-spent-fuel-fukushima-chain-reaction-rods-close-together-pool-audio

  • Fri, Nov 29, 2013 - 03:25am

    #28
    BSV

    BSV

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    Fukushima and bug out bags

Although I did not start this discussion thread, I had the privilege of putting up the first post. It has been a fun learning experience reading the subsequent posts. What an interesting group of people! I would like to add a few comments about bug-out bags and the ongoing situation at Fukushima Dai-Ichi.

First, bug out bags. This past weekend my wife and I hosted a member of  the Peak Prosperity firearms thread and his wife here at our Central Texas farm. What a delightful and charming young couple they are! We had a great time visiting with them. I was able to examine a bug-out bag and I was thoroughly impressed. He has it down to a science and his kit includes everything needed and nothing superfluous. It weighs about 65 pounds, more or less, and includes everything one person needs to survive for several days.

What is easily feasible for a young person is challenging for us seniors. I see that others on this thread recognize their limitations, as I do. We accept our limits and make decisions based on what is practical. That's the point of this discussion thread. Perhaps bug-out bags are not the way to go for most of us. That said, having a bag with some travel essentials and important documents packed and ready is probably a good idea. We can hope it won't be needed.

Turning to Fukushima, I have followed this more or less on a daily basis since the earthquake and tsunami, so I know pretty well what is happening. At Thanksgiving dinner today, I asked my brother-in-law, an educated man and a CPA, if "Fukushima Dai-Ichi" means anything to him, and I got a blank look. That speaks volumes and is pretty well representative of the knowledge level of the general population. That's because the mainstream news media, for whatever reason, has chosen not to inform the public about the issue.

Here is where we are now: TEPCO (Tokyo Electric Power Company), owner of the Dai-Ichi and Dai-Ini (Fukushima number one and two) power plants has commenced removing the fuel rods from the spent fuel pool atop reaction #4. TEPCO has taken a lot of criticism but so far the company seems to be doing pretty well with this very — and I mean very — delicate operation. One cask (with several bundles) of unused fuel rods has been successfully removed from the #4 spent fuel pool and transferred to the common fuel pool about 100 yards away. Another cask has been filled with spent fuel rods and is ready to be transferred to the common fuel pool. For security reasons TEPCO has not said when that transfer will occur, but it might have already taken place or it might happen shortly. The fuel rods are in bundles called assemblies. As a cask is filled with assemblies, it is carefully lowered to a waiting transport truck below and moved slowly to the common fuel pool (which is at ground level and is deemed safer). If all goes well, unloading the #4 spent fuel pool should take about a year. Some patience is required. TEPCO is moving very, very slowly and deliberately.

The immediate problem is transferring about 1,400 fuel rods from the #4 spent fuel pool to the common pool nearby. This is vital because the #4 spent fuel pool is unstable and is five stories above ground level. The underlying soil has been de-stabilized and the entire structure is in danger of collapse. TEPCO has shored up the structure but it is vulnerable to a major earthquake — and Japan sits atop the Pacific "Ring of Fire".

Just my opinion but based upon my extensive reading of everything I can get my hands on, I think TEPCO will likely succeed in transferring the fuel rods from the #4 pool to the common (and more stable) pool. But that's when things start to get really interesting, as in really interesting.

You see, there are six reactors at the Dai-Ichi plant. Reactors #1, 2 and 3 suffered melt-downs and it is thought that the molten nuclear fuel in the #1 reactor has escaped the containment vessel and is within about a foot of melting through the reinforced concrete foundation (pedestal) and into the ground beneath the structure. Reactors #1, 2 and #3 also have spent fuel pools five stories above ground level. Because of the melt-downs radiation levels in all three reactors are much higher than at the #4 spent fuel pool. The fuel rods will have to be removed manually due to extensive damage of the underlying structures. So when TEPCO completes the process of transferring the fuel rods from the #4 spent fuel pool, the real difficulties begin in earnest. Technicians will have to work in high radiation conditions and will quickly use up their allowable exposure time.

Based on my extensive reading on this topic, I can visualize how TEPCO might go about removing the spent fuel rods. It will be extremely challenging and dangerous, but it seems at least feasible. But then comes the ultimate problem of retrieving the molten nuclear fuel from reactors #1, 2 and 3. Nobody knows where this "corium" is located and the tools and engineering methods do not presently exist to find and extract it safely.

Let us not even contemplate worst case scenarios — you don't want to know, for it's that bad. It has been suggested by knowledgeable experts that a concrete sarcophagus be constructed over reactors #1, 2 and 3 and that would make sense except for one thing — groundwater is flowing beneath all three reactors and if the molten corium comes in contact with it, there will be the devil to pay.

So, let us all wish TEPCO the best and hope that they, along with the Japanese government, are able to find ways of decommissioning this toxic disaster before it contaminates the Northern Hemisphere. And yes, that is a realistic possibility.

 

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