Vax Mandate Revolt Brewing in Australian Senate

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  • Sat, Nov 13, 2021 - 12:04am

    #1
    HPHovercraft

    HPHovercraft

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    Vax Mandate Revolt Brewing in Australian Senate

Australia faces a Federal election by 21 May 2022, Next year.

Until now, the only real resistance to the covid narrative was from Craig Kelly MP (United Australia Party)(NSW) in the (Lower) House of Reps.

Now he has been joined by a revolt in the Senate (Upper House) by four senators, two One Nation Party (Pauline Hanson) senators and two of the government’s own Liberal senators.

PM facing final sitting fortnight without a majority as another govt Senator threatens vote over vaccine mandates

https://www.news.com.au/national/politics/pm-facing-final-sitting-fortnight-without-a-majority-as-another-govt-senator-threatens-vote-over-vaccine-mandates/news-story/573fb7d188aa7c423d2b88e8c877cdb5

South Australian Liberal Senator Alex Antic on Friday revealed his intention to go rogue and join Liberal colleague Gerard Rennick in abstaining from all government legislation until unvaccinated people are given legal protections.

The (Conservative) Morrison federal government has not mandated vaccination – that responsibility has been left to state governments, who have moved to mandate the jab for frontline workers and certain industries.

The boycott means the government could be without a majority in the Senate and put Mr Morrison’s legislative agenda for the last sitting fortnight of the year into a tailspin.

Unique Features of the Australian Senate

Australian Senate [wikipedia.org]

Unlike upper houses in other Westminster-style parliamentary systems, the Senate is vested with significant powers, including the capacity to reject all bills, including budget and appropriation bills, initiated by the government in the House of Representatives, making it a distinctive hybrid of British Westminster bicameralism and American-style bicameralism.

As a result of proportional representation, the chamber features a multitude of parties vying for power.

The governing party or coalition, which has to maintain the confidence of the lower house, has not held a majority in the Senate since 2005-2007 (and before that since 1981) and usually needs to negotiate with other parties and independents to get legislation passed.

(My emphasis)

Current and Likely Makup of Australian Senate

The Greens are pro-mandates, like Liberal-National and the Labor parties.

For the above reasons, particularly the One Nation and United Australia but also the (more recent, libertarian and anti-mandate) Liberal Democrat minor parties present a major threat to either of the major (Liberal-National or Labor) parties holding a majority in the Senate.

Australian Hospitals Overhelmed by Mass Wave of Vax Injuries?

Another piece of the present context is the mystery concerning why Australian Hospitals even in States like WA, QLD, Tasmania which have had practically no cases of covid are nonetheless overwhelmed.

Mark McGowan (Premier of WA): “Our hospitals are under enormous pressure. […]

“This is the same in Tasmania, South Australia, New South Wales, Queensland and Victoria.”

“This has been something no-one has ever seen before. The growth in demand in our hospitals.”

Hospitals in AU are slammed but not covid

Something Very Weird Happening in Western Australia – Hospitals Overwhelmed, Vaccinations Continue But They Have No COVID

The Senators and Their Parties

One Nation

Pauline Hanson (QLD)

Hanson: “I’m going to cause so much mayhem in that parliament, as Scott Morrison is doing to the Australian people.”

Morrison must act to end COVID jab coercion!





Malcolm Roberts (QLD)





Liberal National Coalition government

Gerard Renick (QLD)





Alex Antic (SA)





Fellow Australians – Sign the petition – over 150K signatures already!

Sign the petition against mandatory jabs:

https://www.onenation.org.au/vaccine-mandates

A Question for Canadians

I was going to ask Canadians: What happened in the Canadian Federal election? It seems nothing really changed.

I gather the vaccine mandates were opposed by the conservatives (as one of their few ‘conservative’ policies) and, I think, (the rather new, libertarian) People’s Party. But this just wasn’t a significant issue for Canadians?

As noted above, in Australia, the senate would seem to be a very different beast in Australia, being elected proportionally and so far less under the control of either the PM or even the two major (Liberal and Labor) parties.

Senate of Canada [wikipedia.org]

The Senate of Canada […] is modelled after the British House of Lords and consists of 105 members appointed by the governor general on the advice of the prime minister.

HP

  • Sat, Nov 13, 2021 - 04:34am

    #2
    Rob De Paoli

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    Vax Mandate Revolt Brewing in Australian Senate

Signed the petition. Even made a donation. Never thought I’d ever support One Nation but desperate times call for desperate measures!

It’s sad that so few politicians are standing against this madness. I’ve lost all faith in the Liberals and Nationals.

  • Sat, Nov 13, 2021 - 05:49am

    #3
    ozbloke

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    Vax Mandate Revolt Brewing in Australian Senate

Has anyone been able to get death data for Western Australia? I tried to find information but couldn’t find anything current. It would be very interesting to see since we essentially have zero covid here since the start so any increase (or decrease) in deaths would be due to other causes. Ideally we could get daily data broken down by age groups…

Would also be interesting just to get hospital case numbers too but I also couldn’t find anything recent.

  • Sat, Nov 13, 2021 - 06:49am

    #4
    Friedrichs_teeth

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    Vax Mandate Revolt Brewing in Australian Senate

The last Canadian election was exactly a repeat of the previous one. Liberal minority. We don’t do coalitions. The cons were not hardcore against vaccine mandates. They were wishy washy with their  milquetoast leader. It was a non event but at least Justin didn’t get his majority.

  • Sat, Nov 13, 2021 - 01:01pm

    #5
    brushhog

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    Reply To: Vax Mandate Revolt Brewing in Australian Senate

So strange. When I was a kid growing up in the 80’s, Australia was thought of as ‘The Outback’, filled with rugged individuals like Crocodile Dundee.

Its bizarre for me as an American to find that Australians are a disarmed group of cowering collectivists.  They’re not like the way they were depicted AT ALL.

We all had the idea in America that if we didnt feel like we had enough  freedom and personal liberty here, we could always go to Australia and live in the outback where they have total freedom…lol. What a crock!

Has anyone been able to get death data for Western Australia? I tried to find information but couldn’t find anything current. It would be very interesting to see since we essentially have zero covid here since the start so any increase (or decrease) in deaths would be due to other causes. Ideally we could get daily data broken down by age groups…

The most obvious place is the ABS.

There seem to be annual and monthly series. They seem to be broken down by condition and age but not by state. It would be interesting to know how accessible this sort of data is right now.  I get the impression that Covid is distinguished from other causes so you may not need to break it down by state as much as that would obviously be convenient.

Annual:

https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/health/causes-death/causes-death-australia/latest-release

Monthly:

https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/health/causes-death/provisional-mortality-statistics/latest-release

HP

  • Sun, Nov 14, 2021 - 07:53am

    #7
    ozbloke

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    Reply To: Vax Mandate Revolt Brewing in Australian Senate

Thx HPHovercraft!

For comparison with vax administration in AU see the tracking chart below:

https://www.theguardian.com/australia-news/datablog/ng-interactive/2021/nov/08/covid-19-vaccine-rollout-australia-vaccination-rate-progress-how-many-people-vaccinated-percent-tracker-australian-states-number-total-daily-live-data-stats-updates-news-schedule-tracking-chart-percentage-new-cases-today

Really double-dose numbers started taking off around July up through now so we’ll have to wait for more recent data to come through to see if that’s made an impact.

(updated – sorry misread the ABS data deaths includes 2020)

Covid deaths in 2021 up until end July was 920. So according to the ABS data there have been 4841 additional deaths to 25th July compared to 2015-19 average (6% increase). That’s quite a bit and not due to covid.

From Aug on we’ve had about another ~900 more covid deaths due to the outbreaks in NSW and VIC but the ABS data doesn’t cover this period yet.

Hi Brushhog,

One could, I guess, say much the same thing about the United States which is also in many ways also unrecognisable. I don’t necessarily disagree you and have enjoyed your posts on this forum in general. That the overwhelming emotion here has been fear has been very disappointing.

Australia has long been highly urbanized, far more than the US, which probably has something to do with the distribution of water.

Also highly unionized, although far less so now. The union movement in Australia has, in this crisis, completely sold out its members.

Crocodile Dundee is certainly an interesting representation of Australia. It’s very romanticized and I suspect says as much about its intended Audience (which probably wasn’t really Australians) as about Australia.

In saying that, I certainly do not want to deny Paul Hogan (Hoges)’s comic genius which is obvious. It is just Australians (at least those old enough) are likely to remember quite a different, more Australian, Hoges:













This is obviously a limited selection. For a broader range:





HP

  • Sun, Nov 14, 2021 - 09:56am

    #9
    brushhog

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    Vax Mandate Revolt Brewing in Australian Senate

One could, I guess, say much the same thing about the United States which is also in many ways also unrecognisable. I don’t necessarily disagree you and have enjoyed your posts on this forum in general. That the overwhelming emotion here has been fear has been very disappointing.

Australia has long been highly urbanized, far more than the US, which probably has something to do with the distribution of water.

I hear ya, but here in the USA most states have not implemented the types of lockdowns we are seeing. In fact in places like Montana, Texas, Florida, the Dakotas and many more, they have passed legislations to limit or even outlaw the mandates and etc..

In Kentucky, they elected a democrat in 2019, before all the covid hysteria. He immediately began a campaign of executive orders, lockdowns and mandates. The state legislature passed laws to strip him of those executive powers and the state supreme court upheld it almost unanimously. So they now have no mandates, not even a mask mandate. Kids go to school, people go to restaurants, gyms and etc the same way they did in 2018.

It should also be noted that the US is also still heavily armed. Even in my very blue state I can legally own all types of firearms. Red states? Forget it you can walk into any gun store and by a firearm with just proof of residency.

So the US seems to be doing better in that regard than the AU but my perception is only limited to what I read and that usually only pertains to the most extreme examples. Tell me, are there rural places in Australia that have not had the types of lockdowns and restrictions we are reading about? Are there rugged rural individualists in Australia still? Give me a little hope.

Hi Brushhog,

I think that the lockdowns in Australia are easily misunderstood because covid is still not anything like endemic in Australia. The lockdowns, which have admittedly been dominated by the two largest cities (especially Melbourne, Victoria), have been beachheads for covid in Australia. So, geographically at least, most of Australia has seen practically no covid. So they probably made more sense than your average lockdown, although we have all the usual ‘medical nihilism’ of no early treatment and a singular focus on vaccines.

I definitely think that the US is doing far better than Australia which is typically very comparable to Canada. In a way, the US has done remarkably poorly in this pandemic (it has certainly been a mess) but, at the same time, it is difficult to find anywhere else (outside the West) which is going to avoid staggeringly high rates of vaccination. My impression, listening to vanden Bossche, is that he would even regard the rates in the US (anything over 25 per cent) as too high.

Though most Australians probably wouldn’t agree with me. Australia has been remarkably unified in its response and while that looks great on paper and politically, really it just reflects a willingness to accept medical advice from governments (politicians) and so a failure to appreciate just how politicised it is. Australia is much closer to the blue states and there is comparatively little distrust of governments.

Worse still, this seems to be embodied in our legal institutions as discussed in this thread:

Why No Constitutional Legal Remedy in Commonwealth Countries – AU Law & Rights

I think I make my position pretty clear there, so I won’t repeat myself. Presumably, it is the, entirely different, distrust of governments which is embodied in US legal institutions.

What you say about Kentucky is interesting in the light of other issues raised in that thread. I presume the Democrat you mention was what you seem to call a Governor, who seems to be like a mini-president rather than a Mini-Prime Minister that we would expect here. Specifically, it relates to what the hell is going on in Canada? They seem to be overrun with vax mandates and the excuse seems to be that the courts are simply too slow to stop them.  I hope to post my questions regarding this to that thread as soon as I can.

People here have long liked to look down their nose at America (including over the response to covid) for its lack of unity. I personally take this capacity to disagree with one another and adopt alternative courses of action to be central to the capacity to resist tyranny (eg. the current medical group think).

Australians are definitely not heavily armed. If we ever were, and I doubt we ever were, then that ended with a massacre that was impressive even by American standards and occurred in one of our quieter states.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Port_Arthur_massacre_(Australia)

Obviously everyone being armed is quite problematic but I can certainly see the point of it in times like these. The amount of corruption is just staggering and people do need to be able to protect themselves.

Like most Australians, I’ve never lived outside of cities so wonder whether rugged rural individualists are mainly to be found in movies (Mad Max?). I was going to suggest, perhaps, Pauline Hanson (QLD Federal politician, former fish and chip shop owner, see my first post above), but then I remembered that Bob Katter (North QLD Federal Politician), certainly the real deal, discusses crocodile attacks:





HP

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