To all you Tree Huggers, Green Beings, and Eco Friendly Enginners

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  • Wed, Oct 29, 2008 - 04:49am

    #11

    krogoth

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    Re: be realistic ;)

So in summary, wind turbines and the associated technology suck for individual home setups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  • Wed, Oct 29, 2008 - 05:11am

    #12
    dertyoil

    dertyoil

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    Energy use in “modern” non-cave homes

 

Dear Krogoth:

Energy is a wonderful thing. "Modern" homes are energy sinks, so with no sense of integrated energy capture/storage and use, not to mention beauty. Burn the place down (*), collect the insurance and start over. The energy liberated from the burn will get you a new sustainable home, which from the beginning will work for you, not against you.

….Or if you are a practical fellow you can perform a few simple intergration tricks with little capital cost, that are bullet proof, bomb proof and EMP proof designs, my place has become so efficient that the propane company wants to interview me on how I reduced my usage while increasing square footage. 

I’ll be more than happy to share with you what has worked so well for me. Since I wasn’t smart enough to burn my energy sink(house) down when I first bought it.

(*) disclaimer…done at your own bidding, this is not a subliminal message from FEMA, NASA, or anybody else important.

 

 

 

  • Wed, Oct 29, 2008 - 05:27am

    #13

    G

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    Re: Energy use in “modern” non-cave homes

Krogoth, I am not trying to slam anybodies idea, and I certainly would apologize if anything I have said was perceived as such. What I can say is that I have thought a lot about this, the same I am sure as many others have. I have experience with electronic circuit design and a solid knowledge of many high tech sectors. I personally do not see a wind turbine as practical. It would be virtually impossible to service, replace parts, and it is totally conspicuous, in a situation in which people are trying to acquire the necessities such as food, water, shelter, etc.

A wind turbine is totally viable if the system does not crash/production of wind turbines does not fail, I guess that is my point. Solar requires no maintenance other than making sure sun gets to the panels and the panels are not occluded.

 I laid out the key points based on what I would do. If someone can make a logical argument to the contrary I would be very much interested because in the end it just needs to work, for as long and as reliably as possible.

  • Wed, Oct 29, 2008 - 05:31am

    #14

    krogoth

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    Re: Energy use in “modern” non-cave homes

I know gggdude, and thanks for your help so far. I know you are not slamming it, and your advice is valuable.

Thanks again

 

 

 

  • Wed, Oct 29, 2008 - 05:36am

    #15

    krogoth

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    Re: Energy use in “modern” non-cave homes

Thank you for your advice as well. Got to go, my house is burning.

 

Kidding-

I think what I am taking away from this so far is that Wind Turbines are best suited for more of a community than a single home with land for it. The company I am researching here sells the whole kit, and a 60′ mast, starting at around 10k and up. I think they are preparing for the worst in Taiwan and China. They have also told me that these are primarially sold to remote regions, which make up about 65% of the sales they do. Much as I hate Chinese products, the price seemed pretty good. And considering this is an island, we always have a pretty good breeze.

 

Thanks again

 

 

 

 

 

  • Wed, Oct 29, 2008 - 05:53am

    #17

    G

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    Lights

Ok you are all probably saying enough posts already lol

LED’s (light emitting diodes) are in my opinion the only electrical light source anyone should consider.

1) They draw less power for the same amount of light, of virtually any other light source.

2) Low voltage operation, depending on the LED 1 or 2 AAA batteries is all you would need, and the light would last for a VERY long time.

3) Very tough, yes they are very very tough, there is no glass to shatter, do not get ruined when they get wet, etc. Show me a light that is MORE shock proof.

4). They do not burn out in the traditional sense. There is no filament in an LED, most high tech devices use LED’s, when is the last time you can remember one burning out? Chances are you will never see that happen,

5) They are cheap as hell.

  • Wed, Oct 29, 2008 - 05:56am

    #16

    G

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    One last point

It is entirely conceivable that power could fail, become unpredictable, or become expensive in the future. What should concern you just as much is this, dirty power.

This post is for those situations to keep your equipment safe when the power is still ON.

Everyone should have a UPS to keep their high tech equipment safe, no matter what. I have always had one beause you never know when lightning could strike lilterally, or for example when peak demand occurs and the utility company has yet to throw another generator online and all the lights dim, or a car hits a power pole down the block.

 

Dirty power is power that has:

1) Low voltage/under volt/brown out – this is damaging to sensitive electronic equipment

2) High voltage/over volt/surge/spike  – this is also damagin to sensitive electronic equipment

3) Noisy – noise can be introduced into power from many sources

The causes for these scenarios is varied and beyond the discussion here. I know more than one person who has fried a computer due to power surges.

Get a UPS (uniterruptable power supply) and throw your computers and high tech electronics on it. The real purpose of a UPS is the always have clean safe power for these devices, NOT as a battery backup to supply power for any great length of time. Most UPS devices will only power your equipment for 15-30 minutes, long enough to power down your equipment.

Make sure to get a UPS that corrects/kicks in for undervolts and overvolts. Having a UPS that is configurable is a plus. Getting one that is configurable without connecting it to a computer is nice as well.

All my computers and network equipment run off a UPS in my home.

NEVER connect anything but your high tech equipment to your UPS, NEVER connect vacuums, drills, etc, because they are contributors to dirty power and defeat the purpose of isolation your equipment to desire to protect.

G

 

  • Wed, Oct 29, 2008 - 05:58am

    #18

    Damnthematrix

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    One last point

Our solar setup has a built in UPS.  When the grid fails, it automatically switches to the 800Ahr battery bank.  We use so little energy here that if we were careful we could probably survive three cloudy days in a row without power, and as long as you like under sunny days with everything on as usual.

Our house is protected from grid spikes with a surge protector.  It’s really there to protect the thousands of dollars worth of technology on the roof and in the house.

Our house BTW is passive solar designed, and needs zero heating and cooling all year ’round even though we can experience temperature swings of below zero (deg C) in winter and 40 (deg C) in summer….. our last quarterly power bill was $4.65…..

Mike. 

  • Wed, Oct 29, 2008 - 06:00am

    #19

    Damnthematrix

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    Re: To all you Tree Huggers, Green Beings, and Eco Friendly Engi

gggdude, where do you buy LED lights "cheap as hell"?

  • Wed, Oct 29, 2008 - 06:11am

    #20

    G

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    LED’s

LED’s are very inexpensive. If you are willing to wire and solder them up yourself you can make very effective and efficient light sources for a reasonable price.

If you were to buy enough light bulbs to last a reasonable length of time (not even the average length of an LED) you would spend far more money buying traditional incadescent or flourescent lights.

LED’s are not very expensive. I would NOT recommend buying them at Radio Shack.

Buy them from a vendor such as Mouser Electronics. They sell all sorts of other useful electronics such as voltage regulators, diodes and rectifiers, DC-DC power conversion, basic parts, capacitors, transistors, resistors, etc.

You can purchase all of that very cheaply.

You could build a DC power system very cheaply at a fraction of the cost rather than using inverters and prefab equipment.

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