The psychology of climate change

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  • Sun, Jan 03, 2010 - 01:29pm

    #271
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Re: The psychology of climate change

Lionel

Good post.  Being a denier these days requires a concerted effort to ignore the science.  Here’s a good article by Franke Wilmer, a House Representative from Montana:

http://billingsgazette.com/news/opinion/editorial/gazette-opinion/article_cc96164c-f749-11de-b7f9-001cc4c03286.html

[quote]The International Panel on Climate Change concluded, with a statistical probability of 99 percent, that most of the earth’s land base will continue experiencing more warmer and fewer colder days. With statistical confidence of 90 percent the IPCC predicted increasing frequency of heat waves and heavy precipitation. Bozeman temperatures now average 7 degrees higher than in 1950, 26 glaciers remain of 150 that were in Glacier National Park in 1850, and pine beetles killed 17 million more trees on 2 million to 3 million acres.

Over 90 percent of the world’s scientists agree that we are experiencing effects of human-induced climate change, including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, International Council of Academies of Engineering and Technological Sciences, American Geophysical Union, World Meteorological Organization, American Academy of Pediatrics, World Federation of Public Health Associations, American Institute of Physics, and 69 other national and international science organizations. Only six scientific organizations take a noncommittal position. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists, once the lone dissenting scientific organization, rescinded its dissent in 2007 to become the sixth organization adopting a noncommittal position.

Deniers claim a scientific conspiracy but fail to identify any motive for climate researchers to mislead the public. It’s easy, on the other hand, to see a motive for denial — short-term profit from continuing to produce the greenhouse gases that cause global warming.

Most Montanans wouldn’t mind a slightly warmer climate, but that’s not what the science is about. It’s about the extinction of species that, according to Nobel Laureate Dr. Eric Chivian of the Harvard Medical School, may provide medically valuable knowledge, like treatments for peptic ulcer disease affecting 25 million Americans, end stage renal disease that kills 80,000 Americans a year, osteoporosis that kills 70,000 Americans a year, Type 2 diabetes killing a quarter of a million people each year, and arrhythmias.[/quote]

[quote]It’s about the economic and geo-strategic impact of regional climate change on agriculture and energy. It’s about migrations of species like bark beetles and their impact on forestry and wildfires. In impoverished countries it’s about more death and suffering from increases in malaria and water and air-borne diseases. It’s about increased radiation and corresponding increases in skin cancer and melanoma, particularly in higher altitudes.

Knowing that 90 percent of lung cancer deaths in men and 80 percent in women are caused by smoking, most of us don’t smoke and encourage our loved ones to quit. When 90 percent of scientists agree that the effects of climate change put us all at risk, and that there is a high probability that failure to change our behavior by 2015 will make those effects difficult or impossible to reverse, we should take that just as seriously as other scientific facts regarding risks to our health and lives that we routinely accept and, accordingly, change our behavior.[/quote]

So, there’s at least one politician who gets it.  We can only hope that a critical mass of people learn the science and influence their legislators to do the same. 

Chris’s recent experience at the Renaissance Weekend does not suggest that even the “movers and shakers” understand the fundamental issues that we here at Chris’s blog dwell on.  That does not bode well for our near term future, and it puts an extra responsibility on us to spread the word. 

Doug

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2010 - 03:33pm

    #272
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Re: The psychology of climate change

deleted accidental double post

  • Sun, Jan 03, 2010 - 03:38pm

    #273
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Re: The psychology of climate change

[quote=Doug]

[quote]The International Panel on Climate Change concluded, with a statistical probability of 99 percent, that most of the earth’s land base will continue experiencing more warmer and fewer colder days. With statistical confidence of 90 percent the IPCC predicted increasing frequency of heat waves and heavy precipitation. Bozeman temperatures now average 7 degrees higher than in 1950, 26 glaciers remain of 150 that were in Glacier National Park in 1850, and pine beetles killed 17 million more trees on 2 million to 3 million acres.

[/quote]

[/quote]

Give me a break!   Show me where I can put some money on that 1%.  I could make a fortune!

I am not even saying that there is no global warming but just that the chance is far greater than 1%.

  • Fri, Jul 27, 2012 - 09:24pm

    #274
    John Lemieux

    John Lemieux

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    Paul Chefurska’s web site

I have spent a considerable amount of time learning about this issue and I will continue to do so. But my current thoughts are pretty well summed up in this post I’m replying to by CB. But In case anyone is interested I will recommend a website that for me has provided the best source of information on this and many other environmental issues. And there is some particularly thought provoking articals on the neurophycholgy of climate change and related topics. The site is called Approaching The Limits To Growth. Paul Chefurska is an Ecologist from Ottawa Ontario Canada and his site is a labour of love. Everything there is free to read and to share.

  • Sun, Aug 19, 2012 - 02:23pm

    #275

    ralfy

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    The best source for issues

The best source for issues concerning global warming is the organization that even some deniers consider the “gold standard” of science review, the NAS:

http://nas-sites.org/americasclimatechoices/

 

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