The lost art of going for a walk

Login or register to post comments Last Post 0 reads   10 posts
  • Sat, Apr 10, 2021 - 06:00am

    #1
    brushhog

    brushhog

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 06 2015

    Posts: 488

    count placeholder14

    The lost art of going for a walk

When I was a kid, I was fortunate enough to have two great grandparents. These two were very long lived. Great grandfather died in his 90’s, and great grandmother almost made 100. These were people who were born in the 1800’s, immigrated to America at the turn of the century and had amazing stories.

 

One thing that always struck me was how they walked everywhere. Before cars were widely used, if you didnt have a horse and carriage, you walked. Even if you had those things they werent always practical, so walking was often the conveyance of choice. People walked everywhere. When you had to get somewhere, you walked. When the family wanted to go out together, they walked. When a young man and woman were courting, they went for walks.

Even later in life, when cars were everywhere, my great grandparents walked for recreation. After dinner they took walks to take in the sights and fresh air. I wonder with everything we know about Vit D, if these walks out in the fresh air and sunshine had some influence on their incredible health and longevity.

So, recently, I have started taking walks [ Ive been at it since January ]. Not arm pumping, mile counting, speed walks with a “fit bit” clocking my progress and a cellphone in my pocket. Rather, I walk in the spirit of my great grandparents. I ‘perambulate’. The distance is not important, the amount of time Im out isnt fixed, and I take the sights, sounds and smells as an integral part of the experience. I carry a stout ash walking stick that I cut years ago [ I find it helps keep the timing of the gait, balances one on rough terrain, and can be useful in fending off the occasional unleashed dog], a good pair of hiking boots, an appropriate cap and you are ready to go. I stop to chat with locals, wave to cars, and even helped a local lady chase a cat out of her barn ( Ive lived here 12 years and havent said more than ‘hello’ to that lady ).

Once, while out walking I was just coming to a small local pond when a silent brace of ducks flew right over my head and glided onto the water. The only sound was the hiss of the air as they passed me. I’ve had many opportunities to appreciate the wildlife, and Ive watched the trees change daily with the coming spring.

So lets review the incredible host of benefits one can receive from the most simple and basic human movement; Fresh air and sunshine [ infusions of Vit D, solar rays, positive ions and a host of other things which science doesnt even understand ], exercise, pleasurable/interesting sites, forming tighter bonds with community/neighbors etc.. On top of that, Ive noticed a certain increased ‘hardiness’. Because I was out regularly for extended periods in winter, my cold tolerance has increased. Altogether, I feel what might only be described as “vigor”.

I strongly recommend a revival in the old fashioned, time honored art of walking. It takes very little to get started, the benefits Ive done my best to convey, and there arent too many drawbacks that I can think of unless you live in a dangerous neighborhood [? ]. So get out there. Its a beautiful day. There is a whole world out there waiting to meet you. Wave at the passersby, chat with neighbors, observe the birds, stretch the legs, quicken the blood, breath the air, absorb the sun…LIVE DAMN IT! lol, ok thanks for putting up with my caffeine induced ramblings too.

  • Sat, Apr 10, 2021 - 07:53am

    #2
    VTGothic

    VTGothic

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 05 2020

    Posts: 610

    count placeholder3

    The lost art of going for a walk

@brushhog

Your post reminds me of a cartoon I saw back in the 80s in an issue of New Yorker magazine:

A long-haired, bearded fellow dressed in a white t-shirt with the sleeves torn off, a pair of mismatched gym shorts, and old high-top tennis shoes is running down a sidewalk past two stationary women talking. They’re well-coiffed and dressed in coordinated track suits, and they have noticed him; so one is saying to the other: “Really! If you can’t afford to jog, you shouldn’t!”

  • Sat, Apr 10, 2021 - 09:14am

    #3
    dreinmund

    dreinmund

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 19 2011

    Posts: 177

    count placeholder2

    The lost art of going for a walk

I have always liked walking. I don’t like to exercise, but I love to just walk, think, inhale fresh air. Try to do it every day. Perfect for podcasts 🙂

Definitely underrated.

  • Sat, Apr 10, 2021 - 10:41am

    #4
    Kat43

    Kat43

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 10 2020

    Posts: 307

    count placeholder2

    The lost art of going for a walk

Working from home has meant far less walking! No walking to and from my car in the parking garage or up and down the company staircases or wandering down the hall, or the last segment of public transportation from the parking garage. I’m outside much more but puttering around. I haven’t figured out how to make the time around all the other things I want to do outside!

  • Sat, Apr 10, 2021 - 01:14pm

    #5

    Quercus bicolor

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 19 2008

    Posts: 627

    count placeholder7

    Walking the dog

I walk the dog 2 or 3 time a day.  I’ve walked him as early as 3:30 AM (after returning from a music festival where everyone lingered around the fire on the last day until after midnight) – and- as late as 2 AM.  I’d say 90% of my interaction with neighbors is during walks.  It is on walks that I often arrange to give my neighbors my extra eggs, to pick some wild greens in their front yard, or to trade a gallon of frozen my raspberries for a bunch of venison.

And then of course, there is exercise, vitamin D, my interactions with the local nonhuman residents (birds, mammals, plants, trees, etc.), my pauses down in the woods to meditate, and much more.

  • Sat, Apr 10, 2021 - 03:02pm

    #6
    LBL

    LBL

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 11 2020

    Posts: 238

    count placeholder2

    Reply To: The lost art of going for a walk

I have a hill that starts out at 10 degrees and goes up to 40 degrees.

 

Also doing some wildcrafting, growing veg. in the forest.  Mostly corn.

 

Watered 5 1/2 garden sites this morning.  Walked about 1/2 mile up hill towards the town 15 miles NorthEast.

1 of the garden sites was turned over by birds.  Another was eaten up by a rodent who made their home right in the middle of it.  It was 7 1/2 garden sites.

 

Anyway, just doing some gardening on a steep hill and you get walking too.

Also, doing activities where the walking is part of it, whether it’s a nature tour or a golf game, or some “casual tennis” (don’t play to win, just see how long you can keep a rally going) – all that activity is good.

  • Sat, Apr 10, 2021 - 04:31pm

    #7
    stealyourface

    stealyourface

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 14 2020

    Posts: 45

    count placeholder3

    The lost art of going for a walk

Once, while out walking I was just coming to a small local pond when a silent brace of ducks flew right over my head and glided onto the water. The only sound was the hiss of the air as they passed me. I’ve had many opportunities to appreciate the wildlife, and Ive watched the trees change daily with the coming spring.

This is one reason why I enjoyed archery hunting so much. I’d be in the tree stand an hour before sunrise. I’d see and hear things that not too many people experience. Nocturnal nature is fascinating. I once had an owl land on an adjacent branch less than 3 feet away – I don’t know who took the bigger shit – me or the owl

 

  • Sun, Apr 11, 2021 - 05:28am

    #8
    davefairtex

    davefairtex

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 2365

    count placeholder2

    and it turns out

Walking is good for the immune system.  I have data on this.

Seriously.  Its really good info.  “Moderate exercise.”

Tomorrow.

  • Sun, Apr 11, 2021 - 08:34am

    #9
    kunga

    kunga

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 26 2017

    Posts: 440

    count placeholder2

    Dark of the moon

OK all you tree huggers,

New moon tomorrow, time to put some seeds in the soil.

I still have a few freezing nights, but I will cover the beds.

Edit:  Also, good time to start soaking your herbs to make tinctures or oil infusions.  Put herbs plus liquid in a glass jar with a lid.  Stick it in a dark cupboard, such as your frequently opened dish cupboard.  Swirl jar contents several times a day.  Ready in two weeks, at the full moon.

  • Sun, Apr 11, 2021 - 10:22am

    #10

    dgbd

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jul 21 2014

    Posts: 23

    count placeholder2

    The lost art of going for a walk

Good conversation about walking.  I have always walked almost every day for my entire life.  When I went to school I arranged to live close to college and walked to all my classes.  During my working career I arranged to live within a couple of miles of my job so I could walk to work every day. It was a necessary part of tolerating sitting at a desk for 8 hours a day. I walked in all weather but especially enjoyed it on the -20 F mornings. It really helped me acclimate to winter. We had one car in the family and that was reserved for the kids and wife.  Not having a second car for 40 years saved a huge amount of money and made me a healthier calmer person.  Now that I am retired I still walk every morning.  I always thought I was a social  outlier so it is good to hear from all you other walkers.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

Login or Register to post comments