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The Definitive PP Bookshelf Thread

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  • Thu, May 17, 2018 - 08:23pm   (Reply to #26)

    #31
    DennisC

    DennisC

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    The Right-Brain Experience

I have an older book on my bookshelf called “The Right-Brain Experience” by Marilee Zdenek.  Towards the last half of the book are some exercises to help provide a self-assessment of how your hemispheres are battling it out.  One of the most interesting, if not the most frustrating one for me was “other-hand writing”.  In this case, you use your non-dominant hand to write down answers to questions about yourself.  Good luck reading what you write.  For me, just to confuse myself, I try other-handing writing on occassion, brush my teeth with my non-dominant hand (try it), or use my shower brush opposite to what I normally favor.  One side starts goin’ “please stop”.  Fun times.

  • Thu, May 17, 2018 - 08:59pm   (Reply to #25)

    #32
    DennisC

    DennisC

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    Absolutely

I frequent book sales.  Many town libraries in my area unload bunches of stuff every year for cents on the dollar.  It’s usually a couple bucks per shopping bag full.  The second day, the prices are reduced.  The last day is, guess what…free-day (or please take this stuff away day).  Guess what is left-over on free-day.  In my experience, it has typically been how-to:  fix it, make it, cook it, plant it, use a compass, you know, stuff that nobody wanted to pay for (a.k.a. we don’t need to figure this out anymore because we’re all experts now).  Guess what people are tripping over each other for on day one.  Novels.  Not that I don’t like a good novel.  Sorry for all the “guess whats”.  Thrift stores are another good source too, IMO, as you mentioned.

  • Thu, May 17, 2018 - 09:55pm   (Reply to #12)

    #33

    Jim H

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    cholesterol

nedyne said,

20000 years ago high cholesterol and all the nasty effects of animal products didn’t matter.

Nedyne, you are proffering the idea here that people develop high cholesterol because they eat animal products.  This is simply not the way it works;

http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2018/03/mrs-sprat-got-right/

http://www.wheatbellyblog.com/2015/09/leprechauns-nymphs-high-cholestero

People often start their grain-free journey with concerns about losing the purported health benefits of grains while upping their intake of fats, including saturated fats. They are worried that such a dietary change will “increase cholesterol” and thereby increase risk for heart disease.

Let’s get this straight right from the start: Cholesterol in the diet does not cause heart disease, any more than fat, saturated fat, or a voodoo doll pricked with pins by your worst enemy causes heart disease. Just because cholesterol is found in both particles in the bloodstream as well as in atherosclerotic plaque does not necessarily mean that one caused the other. Cholesterol, after all, comprises 25% of the fat content of all cells of the body. Cholesterol in the bloodstream does not cause heart disease, but is a convenience of measurement. Just as you would not blame the dipstick in the crankcase of your car for the engine failing to start, we should not blame this “dipstick” for the particles in the blood, cholesterol, for causing heart disease. Then why this astounding focus on something as blameless as cholesterol, billions of marketing dollars spent on urgings to reduce it, armies of drug representatives and physicians dispensing drugs to treat it, media reports endlessly warning us of its dangers?…

….Even though the dietary contribution to cholesterol synthesis from cholesterol content of foods, such as egg yolks and animal fats, is small to negligible compared to the body’s capacity to manufacture cholesterol, such foods got labeled as unhealthy, while foods low in cholesterol, such as foods from grains, vegetables, and sugars, got labeled as healthy. Largely ignored was the contribution carbohydrates make to increasing cholesterol production by the liver (by providing acetyl CoA, an early step in cholesterol production) (Fears 1981). Even worse, the potential for carbohydrates, especially amylopectin A from grains, to provoke formation of excessive quantities of VLDL that cause dramatic shifts in the size, density, and composition of other particles, such as convert LDL particle size from large to small, was never acknowledged, since that the standard cholesterol panel does not reflect these phenomena.

Oh.. and this;

http://discovermagazine.com/2004/oct/inuit-paradox

Fats have been demonized in the United States, says Eric Dewailly, a professor of preventive medicine at Laval University in Quebec. But all fats are not created equal. This lies at the heart of a paradox—the Inuit paradox, if you will. In the Nunavik villages in northern Quebec, adults over 40 get almost half their calories from native foods, says Dewailly, and they don’t die of heart attacks at nearly the same rates as other Canadians or Americans. Their cardiac death rate is about half of ours, he says. As someone who looks for links between diet and cardiovascular health, he’s intrigued by that reduced risk. Because the traditional Inuit diet is “so restricted,” he says, it’s easier to study than the famously heart-healthy Mediterranean diet, with its cornucopia of vegetables, fruits, grains, herbs, spices, olive oil, and red wine.

A key difference in the typical Nunavik Inuit’s diet is that more than 50 percent of the calories in Inuit native foods come from fats. Much more important, the fats come from wild animals.

  • Fri, May 18, 2018 - 11:42am   (Reply to #30)

    #34
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

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    Teams and teamsters.

Driven single and teams, the first 15-30 minutes are quite tiring and they want to go. Once a light sweat has broken they are a true joy, unrealized by the hydrocarbon belching tractor. Mowing hay with a good team can put you to sleep as the team quickly learns their field and could mow it themselves. 

Here is a friend doing the same.

 

  • Fri, May 18, 2018 - 03:48pm

    #35
    chipshot

    chipshot

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    Nothing by Richard Heinberg?

Surely he’s worthy of being on the list.  LesPhilips was probably referencing a Heinberg book w The Party Is Over  (title is officially The Party’s Over).

Also, seems we need a new thread discussing vegetarianism vs eating animals.

  • Fri, May 18, 2018 - 06:48pm

    #36
    chipshot

    chipshot

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    And “Eco-Economy”

by Lester Brown, a great mind we’d be much better off if we’d paid more attention to him.

Then there is imo the ultimate coffee table book, full of great big picture environmental commentary paired w superb photography, Earth From Above by Yann Arthus-Bertrand.

  • Fri, May 25, 2018 - 05:09pm   (Reply to #25)

    #37
    MKI

    MKI

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    Web

I’m surprised that nobody has listed any “How-To” books. You know, the kind that can limp you through a complex problem if the internet is down. Of course, if you only prep for conditions where the internet is operational, you won’t need any of these books.

I fix everything: cars, bikes, housing, windows, plumbing, boilers, all appliences, computers, clothing, etc., etc. The internet is the absolute key here. I naven’t looked in a book for some time regarding repairs.

The whole “end of the world” idea that electricity or web will go away is flat-out silly. I would just as well assume books will be confiscated and destroyed. The web is a new “Gutenberg Moment”. No going back. We could power it from renewables easy, and would do so and ban all private driving long before the web dies.

  • Fri, May 25, 2018 - 07:55pm   (Reply to #25)

    #38

    Grover

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    Just More Linear Thinking

MKI wrote:

I’m surprised that nobody has listed any “How-To” books. You know, the kind that can limp you through a complex problem if the internet is down. Of course, if you only prep for conditions where the internet is operational, you won’t need any of these books.

I fix everything: cars, bikes, housing, windows, plumbing, boilers, all appliences, computers, clothing, etc., etc. The internet is the absolute key here. I naven’t looked in a book for some time regarding repairs.

The whole “end of the world” idea that electricity or web will go away is flat-out silly. I would just as well assume books will be confiscated and destroyed. The web is a new “Gutenberg Moment”. No going back. We could power it from renewables easy, and would do so and ban all private driving long before the web dies.

MKI,

Good for you! I actually hope you’re right. Unfortunately, hope is a horrible strategy. You’ve demonstrated on other threads that linear thinking is the basis for your ideas of the future. You’ve even admitted that petroleum is a finite resource. Of course, we can just switch to natural gas, right? Others have pointed out that converting all the diesel, gasoline, kerosene, etc. driven engines takes lots of time and resources. Lots of the necessary parts are built in specialized factories throughout the world and require other specialized factories to assemble. There are long supply lines and just-in-time delivery systems everywhere. It works now, in part, because we have plenty of oil to run the transportation system.

What happens if your optimistic views don’t play out at some time? What happens if we get another Carrington event (X70+ solar ejecta aimed directly at earth) that kills many of the satellites and wipes out the electric grid over a large portion of the earth? There goes business as usual.

You, of all people, should know that putting all your eggs in one basket isn’t the smartest thing to do. Right now, these books are considered to be crap by most people who don’t think beyond “what’s for supper” or “who is screwing who in Hollywood.” That means those books are cheap and readily available now. Why wouldn’t you want to hedge your bets when it is such a low cost to do so now?

Grover

  • Fri, May 25, 2018 - 10:56pm   (Reply to #25)

    #39

    mememonkey

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    Fix ‘ Everything’ except your understanding of Systems thinking

MKI wrote:

I fix everything: cars, bikes, housing, windows, plumbing, boilers, all appliences, computers, clothing, etc., etc. The internet is the absolute key here. I naven’t looked in a book for some time regarding repairs.

The whole “end of the world” idea that electricity or web will go away is flat-out silly. I would just as well assume books will be confiscated and destroyed. The web is a new “Gutenberg Moment”. No going back. We could power it from renewables easy, and would do so and ban all private driving long before the web dies.

MKI,

As Grover correctly points out you beliefs are a product of linear thinking.  While I’m sure this simplistic perspective is quite comforting, it ignores fundamental truths and intractable laws of nature as well as the unbroken historical  record of cyclical i.e. non linear (growth and collapse) of human organziations and systems.

Your reductionist notion that equates the viablity of the internet and it’s handy how to youtube videos, to a simple admistriative triage of electricity allocation, ignores the totality of the internet as a complex system.  You don’t account for all of it’s embedded dependencies particulary fossil fuel energy but economic and social dependencies as well.  Dependencies that are a function of a of a growth based system, itself predicated on an impossible exponential increase in extraction of net energy and other finite resources.

Hitting just the highlights, your thesis ignores, diminshing marginal returns on complextity, the Second Law of Thermodynamics, the dynamic of complexity (technology) as a function of energy throughput, the recursive and embedded nature of petroleum and other fossile fuels as the overwhelming resource used and required for manufacturing and maintaining “Renewables”,  the Internet, the electrical grid, indeed technology itself, not to mention the industrial production of food to feed the the population of end users.

You have correctly identified that humans are resourceful and adapative.  In the absence of catasrophic impetus such as thermonuclear war we will no doubt adapt on our way down hubberts curve, however those adapations will in the form of simplification and relocalization, forced on us by the successive likely. catabolic collapse of complexity as we  abandon unsustainable technologies and systems to free up energy for more critical uses as our population, itself a function of energy, reduces.

I know you are fond of mocking Malthus predictions,  I would suggest you look instead at the demonstrated predictive power  of the Limits to Growth study. A group that had better data and methodlogy avail to them.

You would also do well to read some of the books previously recommended in this thread particulary:

Given that it appears you have an unshakeable faith in the power of technology to overcome the fundamental constraints of Ecology I would add to the list of must reads William Catton’s seminal masterpiece:

  • Overshoot: The Ecological Basis for Revolutionary Change

Until and if you can wrap your head around the integrated, systemic, non linear, exponential and biological nautre of our collective predicaments your optimistic counter points touting your belief in the power and inevitablity  of technological “progress” to remedy all things collapse  will remain as simplistic, faith based foolishness.

mm

  • Fri, May 25, 2018 - 11:17pm

    #40

    AKGrannyWGrit

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    Oh Let’s Do Be Silly

The whole “end of the world” idea that electricity or web will go away is flat-out silly. I would just as well assume books will be confiscated and destroyed. The web is a new “Gutenberg Moment”. No going back. We could power it from renewables easy, and would do so and ban all private driving long before the web dies.

Thank god that people think like you do MKI!!!  We have been picking up books for pennies and have a respectable library.  I have no doubt another big quake like the 1964 Alaska Earthquake would/will stifle everyone’s web surfing for a while.  A CME could easily do the same.  Silly …… thinking tomorrow will always be like today.

AKGrannyWGrit

 

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