The Definitive Firearms Thread

Login or register to post comments Last Post 1065680 reads   4 posts
  • Fri, Apr 05, 2013 - 05:41pm

    #2982

    ralfy

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 31 2008

    Posts: 40

    count placeholder

    Poet wrote:I wonder what the

[quote=Poet]

I wonder what the headhunting cultures in Papuna New Guinea would have said if you had happened upon them…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Headhunting#Southeast_Asia_and_Oceania

Or war amongst the Yanomamo:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yanomami#Violence

Now you might argue that it is "Western influence" that has led to war amongst hunter-gatherer societies. Well, since "Western influence" is all over the world now, it's too late. Pandora's box has been opened.

Poet

[/quote]

Read the reference to the Yanomami here:

http://earthfirstnews.wordpress.com/2013/02/07/how-hunter-gatherers-maintained-their-egalitarian-ways-three-complementary-theories/

 

  • Fri, Apr 05, 2013 - 05:42pm

    #2981

    ralfy

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 31 2008

    Posts: 40

    count placeholder

    A. M. wrote:”Hunter-gatherer

[quote=A. M.]"Hunter-gatherer communities reveal the opposite of what you argue), then I decided to add to what you wrote and show what the effects of that violence will be." Anthropologists are totally pseudo-scientists and offer only opinion on how they "think" things are, and Jared diamond more than most. HG civilizations have almost ZERO resource scarcity and almost zero competition for those resources. A quick study of the Native Americans' pre-agricultural (which for many of them was still a viable lifestyle when Lewis and Clark came paddling down the Columbia) had significant amounts of intersocial war. Granted their communes were less troubled, but again, this could be attributed to a number of qualities, and is hard to substantiate through verifiable or empirical fact. Our society fosters a detached connection with death, and ideates and on it continually without much risk of actually dying. Native American culture was wildly varied, but tended to rever and respect life, taking what they needed alone, and looking at death as an important transition. Doesn't mean they didn't have spears, and tomahawks, though, does it? Cheers, Aaron[/quote]

Actually, they have "resource scarcity," which is why they remain hunter-gatherers. And very likely the reason why they did not engage in "intersocial war" is because they did not have surplus resources to do so.

And there is no reference to Diamond in the article.

  • Fri, Apr 05, 2013 - 05:44pm

    #2983

    ralfy

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 31 2008

    Posts: 40

    count placeholder

    I forgot to add that the

I forgot to add that the Yanomami is mentioned in the article shared earlier. According to the writer, it is not a hunter-gatherer group.

 

  • Fri, Apr 05, 2013 - 06:33pm

    #2984

    Aaron M

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 22 2008

    Posts: 790

    count placeholder

    Time/Inclination

Dude, I really dont have time to go quid pro quo with another internet personality, but suffice to say, cultural tendencies directly tie into the rights and responsibilities of that culture.

Hunter gatherer societies have no need for resources beyond food, water and natural tools and live off the land, which has plenty of resources.  Intersocial war in native American societies was common. Clearly, they had the resources to wage wars.

"Everything you've been mentioning" has been a loosely associated, vague allusion to some sort of political point you hint at expressing.  Express it, then.  Frankly, I just think you're a troll, as you never respond to questions asked of you, never propose solutions and only contribute loose, opinion based information that lacks factual backing, as with your rant against the arms industry some time ago.

What exactly do you see yourself offering to the conversation here?
Make a new thread and put whatever on it you want.

Aaron

 

  • Fri, Apr 12, 2013 - 04:05am

    #2985
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1612

    count placeholder

    Thoughts regarding “gun free” zones

I've been trying to wrap my head around the "schools as gun free zones" issue.  Why remove a strong psychological deterrent to criminals/wackos that would harm our children? 

I've personally found firearms and firearm education to be a path to greater individual responsibility and self-reliance.  It also helped reveal the intent of this country's founders and the importance of our Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

My guess is that the reason behind school "gun free" zones has nothing to do with children's safety.  Cue bono?  If you are attempting to "educate" a generation of children about the evils of guns and people that use them, it probably doesn't help to have responsible, armed adults around as potential role models.

For some "non-gun free zone" education, a couple of PNW choices:

Insights Training at the West Coast Armory – Bellevue, WA

Firearms Academy of Seattle – Chehalis, WA

my 2 cents

  • Mon, Apr 15, 2013 - 05:09am

    #2986
    larry

    larry

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 17 2008

    Posts: 8

    count placeholder

    range time

this thread is still going, great job SSGT

seems to be offtrack a little,

religion has killed so many in the name of (fill in your god) … maybe even more than the Marines..but probably not..

turn the other cheek and die, darwin rules.

 

hope everyone is reloading or learning the process, ammo is precious these days,

anyone been to the range lately? Lot of matches out there to test/improve your skills,

3gun, 2 gun, shotgun only, IDPA, USPSA,… get some,

stand up for your right to bear arms or the uneducated politicians will take it away,

backed by the equally biased and uneducated media,

train hard, mind and body, don't be a pos,

best of luck to all of you.

Larry

 

  • Sat, Apr 20, 2013 - 03:45pm

    #2987
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 1038

    count placeholder

    gun control or people control

This gentleman, a former Secret Service agent, expresses my sentiments perfectly.

https://youtube.com/watch?v=R8WLXhahw_A%3Ffeature%3Dplayer_detailpage

  • Sun, Apr 21, 2013 - 12:15am

    #2988

    Travlin

    Status Gold Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 15 2010

    Posts: 524

    count placeholder

    Gun control – A clash of cultures

I agree with Ao.  The real issue is not guns, it’s control.  I posted about this in the Firearms Group.  I’ve reproduced that post below.

—————————————————

Gun control – A clash of cultures

The gun control debate is passionate, divisive, and angry.  But ultimately it is not about guns.  It is about control.  This is becoming the line in the sand where some people say – Enough!  We won’t be pushed any further.

This is the fault line of two cultures with very different views of the world, and freedom.  It will not go away, and it will be a fight to the bitter end.

To better understand this I recommend reading the remarks below.  Then see the full essay.

[quote=Fred Reed]
A staple of American self-esteem is that we Yanks are brave, free, independent, self-reliant, ruggedly individual, and disinclined to accept abuse from anyone.  Call it “freedom.” Because we were free, we felt free.  It was a distinct psychology, though we didn’t know it.

Things then changed. The country increasingly urbanized. So much for rugged.  Self-reliance went. Few any longer can fix a car or the plumbing, grow food, hunt, bait a hook or install a new roof. Or defend themselves. To overstate barely, everyone depends on someone else, often the government, for everything. Thus we became the Hive.

Serving as little more than cubicle fodder, they could not survive a serious crisis like the first Depression. And they look to the collective, the hive, for protection. The notion of individual self-defense, whether with a fist or a Sig 9, is, you know, like scary, or, well, just wrong or macho or something. I mean, if you find an intruder in your house at night, shouldn’t you, like, call a caring adult?
[/quote]

Read the full essay

Travlin

  • Sun, Apr 21, 2013 - 12:56am

    #2989

    Lnorris

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 28 2011

    Posts: 84

    count placeholder

    Mila 18 – Leon Uris

I’m re-reading Mila 18. I read it when I was in high school. What feels like a life time later, I wanted to read it again. It is a story of the Warsaw ghetto during the Nazi tyranny.
It’s an eye opening account of the people who defied the odds and struggled against one of the most horrific times in our human history – a time that we should all remember no matter what our heritage is.

Lynne

  • Sun, Apr 21, 2013 - 01:46am

    #2990

    Jdcstar

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 10 2011

    Posts: 1

    count placeholder

    Freedom

Dog: Your information and delivery is well spoken as well as your kind response to Sue's reference to the arms race . I was blessed with a houseful of girls which all possess their Texas CHL's and are very proficient with both their Glock 19's and Springfield XD's. I personally prefer the Kimber 1911 frame in both .45 and 9 mm. Freedom is never more than one generation away from extinction. We didn't pass it to our children in the bloodstream. It must be fought for, protected, and handed on for them to do the same, or one day we will spend our sunset years telling our children and our children's children what it was once like in the United States where men were free. Ronald Reagan

Viewing 10 posts - 2,981 through 2,990 (of 3,051 total)

Login or Register to post comments