The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

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Some info on colloidal silver.  Scroll down to the plant spray section for dilution rate. They recommend 5ppm.

http://www.zimbio.com/Colloidal+Silver+Secrets/articles/48/Using+Colloidal+Silver+Healthier+Fruits+Vegetables

 

  • Tue, Jun 01, 2010 - 08:28pm

    #602
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Re: blight / mushroom spore soil innoculation

Hey Dogs_in_a_Pile-

I make my own spore innoculations from fresh shrooms (do not wash), put in a blender 1/2 filled with water and 1/4 cup peroxide. Blend well and since the mix is still lumpy I pour the mix where I’m innoculating the garden, compost pile or animal bedding.. . or just toss in some fresh shrooms.

Yearly, we scoop out the animal bedding and pile it for composting, I also pour it there since the old straw makes a perfect medium for the mycilium to grow. . . . we don’t eat the mushrooms but turning the pile ever 3 – 5 months makes a rich fluffy loam soil that gets spred into the garden areas and can be used for potting starter plants. I have also poured the mix right on the animal bedding inside the barn to help get things going early since we do deep bedding.

As for the collidiol silver – its 1 of the 2 things I keep to maintain healthy animals. The c. silver reduces (if not eliminates) parasites and most animal diseases. I use it on our goats, sheep and dogs. We also rotate our pasture areas frequently to avoid re-infestation. For the dogs I put some in their water as an alternative to vaccines since the last time I had 2 of our 3 dogs vaccinated – they got cataracts by the next day. The “other thing” I keep stock of for the dairy animals is a mineral oil-activated charcoal-baking soda mix for bloat. Ya never know when those dare animals will get into eating a toxic weed. I also use the dianaceous (spelling?) earth and lime around the barn to keep down insects and any odors and they get salts and mineral salts.

For our chickens, thats a little different since I noticed if I give them too much c silver their eggs shells get thin. I do however give them c silver when they first hatch to they get off to a healthy start.

A month ago I got a nasty tick bite- the deer tick had the famous red ring around it by time I noticed I’d been bit. I went on a 3 week daily dose of c silver and it cleared up – better every day. I had lyme’s disease in the 80s and went through 6+ months of very painful aching rounds of anti-biotics. For those who don’t know about c silver, it is a powerful immune system booster. The only thing I found to be stronger is collidoil gold.

Dose? Since I KNEW I had blight – I would start the season off with straight up c silver sprayed on the plants and surrounding area. If I only suspected it- I would dilute it. 

Come to think of it – I might try innoculating some of my potatoes next year and try keeping them for seed potatoes and see how many years I can keep them going. “They” say you can’t keep taters for seed stock so I might give that a try.  hmmm might be a new thing to see if it works. . .

A Dog’s Paradise is No Less A Paradise.

Peace. EGP

  • Wed, Jun 16, 2010 - 01:58am

    #603
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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

Well, I have finally made my way through the Permaculture thread. I skipped over most of the animal related ones as I am trying to go vegan, although I did read some of them as they were quite interesting. I did not know you could get milk from sheep. Amazing what one can learn on this site!

Anyways, I’m closing on a home in August and I feel a little overwhelmed on exactly where to start. I’ve already read a couple of books mentioned in this thread(Square Foot Gardening, Gaia’s Garden). Also, I’m currently reading about lasagna gardening. I have on my reading list Edible Forest Gardens and the Bill Mollison’s Permaculture book.

I’d like to hit the ground running in August and set up my homestead right from the beginning, or as right as possible. Granted, I don’t have an entire growing season to work with once August rolls around. I’ve seen some mention of people taking permaculture design courses. I could certainly do that. Or, I could hire one of these trained designers to show me the way. Has anyone worked with a designer? How does one go about finding a designer in their area? I guess I could always hire Mike(DTM) from Australia. Laughing

  • Wed, Jun 16, 2010 - 02:30am

    #604
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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

Hi Joe-

I’m not a designer or landscaper but I have grown a modest garden for the last 30 years – and – recently we’ve gone bat-nuts over growing our own food (after we bought the farm). And yeah – sheep can give really good milk but you need dairy sheep (Icelandics or East Fresians). We did our own sheering and my sheep look like they went through a blender but hopefully they are cooler and we’ll learn how to get better wool for rugs and blankets.

There are plenty of foods to grow winters in CT in a greenhouse. Cold Crops like lettuce, string beans, broccoli, cabbage, spinach, cauliflour, swiss chard, peas and many root crops – carrots, onions, beets as long as the greenhouse stays above freezing. Some you can grow if you cover with a cloth on cool nights.

We’re in process of doing edible and permaculture gardening and I found that some of the cauliflour and beets I put in last year and left in the ground over winter came up and are ready early or producing seed – so – these will go in my permacultured woods areas.

You can plant most trees over fall (if they come to you as dorment – keep them cold till the ground cools down so they don’t leaf-out till spring. AND, you should be finding them on sale soon.

Good luck and enjoy the journey – EGP

  • Wed, Jun 16, 2010 - 10:25am

    #605
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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

[quote=joemanc]Anyways, I’m closing on a home in August and I feel a little overwhelmed on exactly where to start. I’ve already read a couple of books mentioned in this thread(Square Foot Gardening, Gaia’s Garden). Also, I’m currently reading about lasagna gardening. I have on my reading list Edible Forest Gardens and the Bill Mollison’s Permaculture book.[/quote]

I didn’t do too well with the square foot garden, in my one experimental bed. It may have been the mix of composts – it’s difficult finding five different organic composts – but many of my plants just lay dormant for most of the time, after emerging from seed (I didn’t raise seeds separately, probably another problem, instead sowing directly into the bed). I’ve abandoned that idea, for now.

I’m trying Linda Woodrow’s Permaculture Home Garden technique, though her location, in Australia, is not the same as mine, in New Zealand. It’s early days though I’m encouraged by my initial meagre results so far.

I’m also planning to do a bit of bio-intensive gardening, as per John Jeavons. Toby Hemingway’s description of a day in the life of a mature oak tree is inspiring and his description of forest gardening is tempting. I’m not sure I have enough land to try everything but I hope to try as much as possible. The trouble with Lasagne Gardening is getting all the mulch – I’m not as industrious as Pat  Lanza.

A permaculture course is also a possibility for me, though it’s quite expensive and means taking a week out (it’s a residential course).

Tony

  • Wed, Jun 16, 2010 - 09:08pm

    #606
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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

Fun with aphids!

They love kale, hang out there and lay billions of eggs that hatch in spring.  The hatchlings hang out in masses on young stems.  I pick a bouquet of stems and present them to the chickens, which go mad with delight over their high protein snack.  Each one of those aphid cuties could have spawned 32 subsequent generations this gardening season, so I’m up in the trillions now in aphid avoidance – a super-satisfying pest control experience!

  • Wed, Jun 16, 2010 - 09:42pm

    #607
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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

[quote=joemanc]

Well, I have finally made my way through the Permaculture thread. I skipped over most of the animal related ones as I am trying to go vegan

[/quote]

Permaculture without animals…?  OXYMORON!

Animals here provide milk (goats are way better than sheep), manure, pest and weed control.  And meat.  Humans are meant to eat meat.  Yes we are eat way too much of it as a society, but some meat, especially really healthy meat you raise yourself humanely, full of healthy Omega 3 Fatty Acids, are necessary to finish off a healthy diet.  

Animals are an INTEGRAL part of the Permaculture ecosystem, it is what permaculture is all about..  Permaculture isn’t “gardening”, it’s ecosystem building, by copying nature.

Mike

  • Wed, Jun 16, 2010 - 10:30pm

    #608
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    Re: snails as garden pests?

Hey, does anyone have any knowledge or experience about snails as pests in your garden?  -And how to get rid of them?  I have found a couple of different plants stripped of leaves -a new blueberry bush, a couple of new elderberry bushes, and a couple new black raspberry bushes.  There are other bushes near them that are the fully leafed-out and the pictures of health, so it seems like either those bushes just weren’t making the initial transition (being transplanted).  Or that some pest found those particular bushes more yummy than the neighbors.  And the one thing I seem to be finding in their vacinity, and on some leaves, are small snails!

Also, what a difference there is living in the different growing zones!  People above in May talking about harvesting squash already, and bushes full of blackberries.  I’m in zone 4/5 and barely just finished planting my garden, and new berry bushes!

  • Wed, Jun 16, 2010 - 10:44pm

    #609
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    Re: snails as garden pests?

See…….  if you had ducks, you wouldn’t have snails!

Mike

  • Wed, Jun 16, 2010 - 11:16pm

    #610
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    Re: Snails as garden pests?

Good point, DTM!    And you gave me a good laugh!

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