The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

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  • Fri, Mar 27, 2009 - 03:35pm

    #11
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

[quote=capesurvivor]

Good idea, Aaron! 

I haven’t done this and there may be better sites but I’d rather try this than rubber tires. Uh,  under crop plants..tubers? Anyone try this? 

http://www.weidners.com/spud_Barrel.htm

SG

 

 

[/quote]

Yep .. I planted mine on the 17th

 

 

  • Fri, Mar 27, 2009 - 04:22pm

    #12
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

Thanks,

That’s just a week ago; still time for me. Looks like you did some nice work on the barrel.

 

SG

  • Fri, Mar 27, 2009 - 04:25pm

    #13
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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

Has anyone considered raising rabbits for meat? In my experience they a easy to raise, and delicious to boot. Their diet is less grain based than a chickens and can easily be supplied with only a scythe on fallow land. Although they only lay eggs on Easter, their reproduction is amazing. The meat is tender and doesn’t require much water for processing. I think they are an excellent choice for sustainable homestead meat production.

 My two cents.From the peanut gallery.

 Spencer

  • Fri, Mar 27, 2009 - 04:28pm

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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

I planted my peas on the 17th also

the fence for the peas to climb on
is green plastic fence .. $22 for 50 ft, Home Depot (you’re looking at 40 ft) ..

(4) 10 ft lengths of 3/4" PVC tubing cut in half at 45 deg. angle ..
driven in 1 ft. over top of 4 ft reinforcement rod ..
reinforcement rod was driven 2 ft into the ground

the fluffy balls you see on the line are clumps of dog hair tie-wrapped to 18 gauge coated wire
that I had in the barn .. dog hair is the best thing I have found for keeping deer away, I have used
it for many years in my apple trees .. the dog hair must be unwashed.

 

plastic stakes holding the fence down

Tie-Wraps placed through a drilled hole keeping the fence from sliding down

 

 

 

  • Fri, Mar 27, 2009 - 04:33pm

    #15
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

Tom,

Is there an "expiration date" on the dog hair trick?
We get a lot of rain up here, and I’m wondering how long it’d keep scent.

Thanks for the great post, as usual,

Aaron

  • Fri, Mar 27, 2009 - 04:51pm

    #16
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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

I made this composter that cost me $22.00 in hardware (Home Depot) + $15 for the barrel (ebay)
works as good as the commercial ones that cost $300 with half the capacity.

 

 

  • Fri, Mar 27, 2009 - 04:55pm

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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

[quote=Aaron Moyer]

Tom,

Is there an "expiration date" on the dog hair trick?
We get a lot of rain up here, and I’m wondering how long it’d keep scent.

Thanks for the great post, as usual,

Aaron

[/quote]

Aaron, go to a pet groomer .. they will load you up with a trash bag full for free .. keep it sealed & replenish as necessary, I only had to replenish once last year .. but no way do we get rain in PA like you do in the NW.

just keep sniffin  Laughing

  • Fri, Mar 27, 2009 - 04:59pm

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    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

Nicely done also!

Here’s  a question from an amateur farmer-would sweet potatoes work in that barrel? Different vegetable family? Genus? Species, LOL?

 I like the added nutritional benefits of sweet potatoes/yams. Will check out Home Depot for those clasps.

What part of country are you growing in?

 

SG

 

 

I

  • Fri, Mar 27, 2009 - 05:39pm

    #19
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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

[quote=Tom Loftus]

I made this composter that cost me $22.00 in hardware (Home Depot) + $15 for the barrel (ebay)
works as good as the commercial ones that cost $300 with half the capacity.

[/quote]

Tom –

Did you use any bushings where the PVC runs through the center of the barrel or is it just a cutout?  Wondering if wear and tear would be a concern.

 

  • Fri, Mar 27, 2009 - 05:44pm

    #20
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    Re: The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

I’m sure everyone has their own organic fertilizer mix, but I wanted to share one that is working unbelievably for me.

-4 parts Seed-meal ( I use a mix of Cottonseed meal and Alfalfa seed-meal. You can buy 50lb bags at a farm and ranch feed store very cheaply)

-1/2 to 1 part Kelp meal (Can be difficult to find and rather expensive, but provides important micronutrients. You may also use basalt dust for this component)

-1 part rock phosphate or bonemeal

-1 part Lime mix (1/3 Agriculture Lime, 1/3 Dolomite, and 1/3 Gypsum)

And of course you need to throw some good compost into the mix as well.

So far the only crops that I have harvested with this mix have been a few tomatoes, but these are the best tomatoes my wife and I have ever eaten. We are very excited about this growing season. We have liked the results of this organic fertilizer mix so much, that I bought enough mix components for about 5 years worth of this mix (about $500 in cost).

I should mention that I derived this mix from Steve Solomon’s book Gardening When It Counts: Growing Food in Hard Times (Mother Earth News Wiser Living Series). He has a fantastic FREE online library at http://www.soilandhealth.org . Check it out.

 Jeff 

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