The Definitive Agriculture/Permaculture Thread

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  • Wed, Nov 30, 2011 - 01:27am

    #1071
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Nardello Peppers – surprisingly hot all of the sudden ???

 I planted these Nardello heirloom seeds bought from Seeds of Change.

Towards the end of the summer they started to produce a lot of nice sweet seven inch long peppers with a little hit of zing to them.  I have been stuffing them with hummus and eating them for a snack.

I moved five plants inside for the winter and they have about 30 peppers on them but they have turned red while only about three inches long.  One of the plants has much smaller ones than the others.

Tonight I picked one of the small ones and just started muching int from the tip back.  It turned out to have seeds down the entire small length, unlike the long ones that only had about 3/4 inch of seeds near the top.

Well this one burned my head off.  I had to gargle with a baking soda solution to try to neutralize my throat.  It is much hotter than the little green hot peppers I buy at the store.

Any idea what happened?

The only thing I can think of is that the plant somehow genetically reverted to an ancestor that was a hot pepper that must have been crossed with a sweet pepper to add a little zing.

I did not grow any hot peppers in my garden that might have cross pollinated the Nardellos.

All I know is that in my experience plants raised indoors take on slightly different growth patterns. Example: out-of-doors, my basil gets two-and-a-half-feet tall and gets flowers and seeds. Indoors the same plant gets maybe one foot tall, is shaped funny, and never blooms.

Bell peppers grown indoors often die on me, and when they live they give smaller, stunted fruit. My guess is that the ones you grew indoors were hotter, in part, due to all the extra seeds you commented on. Seeds are the hottest part of any hot pepper. Other than that I’d guess the flesh had the same amount of heat as a large pepper distilled down into a smaller one.

These are educated guesses, but guesses nonetheless. Sounds like you could haveset these, dry them, grind them, and use them to make a great seasoning that you’d use very sparingly!

 I brought the pepper into work and several people that like hot peppers tried the tiniest of slivers.

The minute they put it on their tongue they feel the heat and end up trying to flush out their mouths.

They say that this pepper is off the scale compared to the hot peppers that the usually eat.

Given that they look like small nardello peppers i can only assume that some seeds got mixed up at seeds of change.  I may have to call or email them to see if they have any ideas.

  • Wed, Nov 30, 2011 - 03:20pm

    #1074
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    assuming no genetic mix-up.

assuming no genetic mix-up. Peppers’ heat increases as plant stress increases. Plant stress would include but not be exclusive to nutrition,light,water….etyc.     robie

[quote=joesxm2011]

 I planted these Nardello heirloom seeds bought from Seeds of Change.

Towards the end of the summer they started to produce a lot of nice sweet seven inch long peppers with a little hit of zing to them.  I have been stuffing them with hummus and eating them for a snack.

I moved five plants inside for the winter and they have about 30 peppers on them but they have turned red while only about three inches long.  One of the plants has much smaller ones than the others.

Tonight I picked one of the small ones and just started muching int from the tip back.  It turned out to have seeds down the entire small length, unlike the long ones that only had about 3/4 inch of seeds near the top.

Well this one burned my head off.  I had to gargle with a baking soda solution to try to neutralize my throat.  It is much hotter than the little green hot peppers I buy at the store.

Any idea what happened?

The only thing I can think of is that the plant somehow genetically reverted to an ancestor that was a hot pepper that must have been crossed with a sweet pepper to add a little zing.

I did not grow any hot peppers in my garden that might have cross pollinated the Nardellos.

[/quote]

You need to consult our resident expert on peppers, Dogs-in-a-Pile. By the way, where’s Dogs been lately? It seems to me that he hasn’t posted in a while. Anybody heard from him lately???

I sent Dogs a PM thinking that he might like some seeds, but that was just this morning.

Robie,

I moved in five plants that I dug up and put into 5 gallon buckets.  I have had some trouble adjusting the water level.  I have them under the grow light I use for seedlings and I may be running it more than they are used to.

However, near as I can tell the other four plants are producing the normal long sweet peppers, although the baseline one I brought in to work to compare to the hot one seems a little hotter than usual.

What all the people here are saying is that this pepper is the hottest they have ever seen.

Seeds of Change sells a "Ring of Fire Chile Pepper" that seems to look like the hot one, so I am leaning towards some contamination of my seep package with a few of the hot seeds. 

  • Mon, Dec 19, 2011 - 03:13pm

    #1077
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    2000 Year Old Food Forest Oasis in Morocco

Talk about long-term investing….

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hftgWcD-1Nw

Best….Jeff

[quote=robie robinson]

assuming no genetic mix-up. Peppers’ heat increases as plant stress increases. Plant stress would include but not be exclusive to nutrition,light,water….etyc.     robie

[/quote]

That may explain our experience one year when the weather was unusually hot and dry.  Everything we grew that was supposed to be hot (radishes, peppers, onions) all turned out to be super hot.  I haven’t heard that theory before.

Doug

  • Mon, Dec 19, 2011 - 03:55pm

    #1079
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    Gardening Plan to Save Money On Your Grocery Bill

With many planning their gardens for next year right now, I thought this was an interesting approach to gardening; put focus on growing the produce that is the most expensive to buy at the supermarkets. I know many here use the square-foot gardening method, so I thought this chart would help you minimize your grocery bill on a square foot basis.

The Most Profitable Plants in Your Vegetable Garden

Can you guys grow cilantro up north (and do you use it in your cooking)?

Vegetable USD Value/SF
Cilantro $ 21.20
Arugula-Roquette $ 20.92
Green Salad Mix $ 17.55
Chives $ 16.40
Dill $ 16.40
Lettuce $ 16.20
Tomato, Cherry, small & medium $ 15.57
Turnip $ 9.90
Tomato, large $ 9.50
Squash, Winter $ 8.40
Tomatillo $ 8.00
Cucumber $ 7.74
Basil $ 6.63
Radish, Red $ 6.22
Pumpkin $ 6.20
Chard, Swiss $ 6.14
Celery $ 6.00
Squash, Summer $ 5.96
Choi $ 5.70
Peas, Snow $ 4.50
Pepper, Jalapeño $ 4.50
Squash, Summer, Zucchini $ 4.17
Onion, Bunching $ 4.14
Pepper, Bell $ 3.60
Brussels Sprouts $ 3.59
Carrots $ 3.56
Rhubarb $ 3.25
Squash, Winter, Butternut $ 3.20
Kale $ 3.07
Grass, Lemon $ 3.00
Peas, English $ 3.00
Onion, Bulb $ 2.63
Radish, White $ 2.60
Bean, Bush $ 2.51
Peas, Edible Pod $ 2.50
Artichoke, Globe $ 2.40
Cabbage, Chinese Napa $ 2.24
Squash, Winter, Delicata $ 2.10
Spinach, Spring/Fall $ 1.80
Leeks $ 1.75
Potatoes $ 1.50
Parsnips $ 1.50
Garlic $ 1.37
Squash, Summer, Yellow $ 1.34
Parsley $ 1.31
Corn $ 1.25
Squash, Winter, Acorn $ 1.20
Squash, Winter, Hubbard $ 1.20
Eggplant $ 1.10
Greens, Mustard $ 1.10
Rutabaga $ 1.00
Beet $ 0.89
Cabbage, Savoy $ 0.80
Broccoli $ 0.80
Kohlrabi $ 0.75
Cauliflower $ 0.60
Broccoli, Chinese $ 0.60
Cabbage $ 0.50
  • Mon, Dec 19, 2011 - 04:30pm

    #1080
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    JAG – Great idea

 I assume this is per growing season?  Some plants are cut and come again…  Would depend on the length of the growing season.

– Jim

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