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Hey AKG-

I recently bought and highly suggest the book The Resilient Gardener by Carol Deppe as an answer to your question— caveat: the author is oriented toward the Pacific Northwest in terms of specific plant varietals but very much a 3E oriented book. Cheers

Carol deepe, the resilient gardener. 

 

She, Carol Deepe,  is also right that winter squash are much easier to harvest than potatoes or sweet potatoes. 

I have grown all three, and harvesting sweet potatoes is the hardest as they break easier than regular potatoes and they need special treatment to cure them.  I did get an amazing number of sweet potatoe starts off of one purple sweet potatoe bought, organic, from teh health food store.  More than I could possibly use, but I had to start them very early, like now or last month indoors, and the ones that yielded were transpanted to pots indoors to get even bigger before being set out.

 

 

my mistake. Just saw where this was posted. Same as the yam post above — please ignore — I saw this on the “all recent comments page”, and did not see a header as to where it was posted. (deleted own text.)

  • Wed, Feb 20, 2019 - 07:50am   (Reply to #14)

    #24
    Yoxa

    Yoxa

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 20 2011

    Posts: 309

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    Potatoes

Quote:

 winter squash are much easier to harvest than potatoes or sweet potatoes

A note from Irish history: the very work it takes to dig potatoes was one of the reasons they became such a dominant crop for the Irish. Ireland saw much fighting over the years, and root crops were less prone to destruction in war. It would be easy for your enemy to burn your grain fields; much harder to destroy your potato crop.

Yoxa wrote:
Quote:

 winter squash are much easier to harvest than potatoes or sweet potatoes

A note from Irish history: the very work it takes to dig potatoes was one of the reasons they became such a dominant crop for the Irish. Ireland saw much fighting over the years, and root crops were less prone to destruction in war. It would be easy for your enemy to burn your grain fields; much harder to destroy your potato crop.

 

For sure.  I like potatoes, and they stay safer from pests, insects and birds and rodents than many potential crops.  It is impossible to get tree nuts here, for example, without a full on war against squirrels, rats and birds take a toll on tree fruit, etc….  Potatoes are pretty safe.  And, I dont mid digging them out kind of like treasure hunting.  I much prefer digging regular potatoes vs. sweet potatoes.  The sweet potatoes are much more prne to breakage when trying to harvest.

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