Study Explains Japan’s Sudden Decrease In Infections

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  • Sun, Nov 21, 2021 - 09:34am

    #1
    Mike from Jersey

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    Study Explains Japan’s Sudden Decrease In Infections

Why did Japan’s fifth and biggest wave of the coronavirus pandemic, driven by the supercontagious delta variant, suddenly come to an abrupt end following a seemingly relentless rise in new infections? And what made Japan different from other developed countries that are now seeing a fresh surge in new cases?

According to one group of researchers, the surprising answer may be that the delta variant took care of itself in an act of “self-extinction.”

Japan Times

  • Sun, Nov 21, 2021 - 09:47am

    #2
    sketchypoodle

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    Study Explains Japan’s Sudden Decrease In Infections

I believe Japan also went to IVM early treatment?

  • Sun, Nov 21, 2021 - 01:11pm

    #3
    wotthecurtains

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    Study Explains Japan’s Sudden Decrease In Infections

I expect to see this amazing theory of Self Extinction offered to explain what happened in India as well.

A few years ago, people in the street were being harrassed by “peaceful protestors” demanding that they “Say her name”.

Maybe we need #SayIvermectin as a grassroots campaign.   Whenever someone says, “Experts have concluded that sometimes Covid just commits mass suicide in places and no one knows why”.   We would respond:  “Say Ivermectin”.

  • Sun, Nov 21, 2021 - 01:36pm

    #4
    dreinmund

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    Study Explains Japan’s Sudden Decrease In Infections

This doesn’t make sense. If this was a mutation, it would only become one dominant if it had some kind of advantage. Going extinct is not an advantage. Would love to see Bret Weinstein weigh in from an evolutionary biologist perspective.

  • Sun, Nov 21, 2021 - 02:34pm

    #5
    Aria

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    Study Explains Japan’s Sudden Decrease In Infections

The Japan Times did not allow me to read the article. Can someone briefly summarize in a couple of sentences what was said? Thanks

  • Sun, Nov 21, 2021 - 02:42pm

    #6
    dreinmund

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    Study Explains Japan’s Sudden Decrease In Infections

But the chief reason may be related to the genetic changes that the coronavirus undergoes during reproduction, at a pace of around two mutations per month. According to a potentially revolutionary theory proposed by Ituro Inoue, a professor at the National Institute of Genetics, the delta variant in Japan accumulated too many mutations to the virus’s error-correcting, non-structural protein called nsp14. As a result, the virus struggled to repair the errors in time, ultimately leading to “self-destruction.”

Studies have shown that more people in Asia have a defense enzyme called APOBEC3A that attacks RNA viruses, including the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19, when compared to people in Europe and Africa.

So the researchers from the National Institute of Genetics and Niigata University set out to discover how the APOBEC3A protein affects the nsp14 protein and whether it can inhibit the activity of the coronavirus. The team conducted an analysis of the genetic diversity data for the alpha and delta variants from infected clinical specimens in Japan from June to October.

[…]

The network of the alpha variant, which was the main driver for Japan’s fourth wave from March to June, had five major groups with many mutations branching out, confirming a high level of genetic diversity. The researchers thought the delta variant, which the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says is more than twice as contagious as previous variants and might cause more severe illness in unvaccinated people, would have a far more vibrant genetic diversity.

Surprisingly, they found the opposite to be true. The haplotype network had only two major groups and the mutations seemed to come to a sudden stop in the middle of its evolutionary development process. When the researchers went on to examine the virus’s error-correcting enzyme nsp14, they discovered that the vast majority of nsp14 specimens in Japan seemed to have undergone many genetic changes in mutation sites called A394V.

“We were literally shocked to see the findings,” Inoue told The Japan Times. “The delta variant in Japan was highly transmissible and keeping other variants out. But as the mutations piled up, we believe it eventually became a faulty virus and it was unable to make copies of itself. Considering that the cases haven’t been increasing, we think that at some point during such mutations it headed straight toward its natural extinction.”

[…]

Indeed, the unexpected plunge in new cases following the summer wave has been a hot topic of discussion among many experts, including those not conducting studies on the coronavirus, according to Takeshi Urano, a professor at Shimane University’s Faculty of Medicine who was not involved in the research led by Inoue.

“Nsp14 works with other virus proteins and has a critical function to protect the virus RNA from breaking apart,” he said when asked about Inoue’s findings. “Studies have shown that a virus with a crippled nsp14 has a significantly reduced ability to replicate, so this can be one factor behind the rapid decline in new cases. The nsp14 is virus-derived, and the chemical agent to curb this protein could become a promising medicine, with development already underway.”

Japan seems to be an anomaly in that the delta variant was virtually shutting out alpha and other variants by late August. On the other hand, other countries — including India and Indonesia, both of which were hit particularly hard by the delta variant — have reported a mix of alpha and delta strains among cases.

 

 

  • Sun, Nov 21, 2021 - 02:52pm   (Reply to #6)

    #7
    Aria

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    Study Explains Japan’s Sudden Decrease In Infections

Thank you for posting that info, dreinmund.

  • Sun, Nov 21, 2021 - 03:03pm

    #8
    dreinmund

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    Study Explains Japan’s Sudden Decrease In Infections

Note that the study doesn’t really explain, but just speculate.

  • Sun, Nov 21, 2021 - 03:37pm

    #9
    emdashtheory

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    Study Explains Japan’s Sudden Decrease In Infections

It’s definitely Ivermectin.

  • Sun, Nov 21, 2021 - 09:46pm

    #10
    Kathy

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    Ivermectin is in the soil? It was discovered in Japan

Not sure if it was ever really studied but my guess is there is something like an algae bloom and a bunch ivermectin gets dumped into the air/soil like when you step on some puff mushroom.

Kathy

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