Storm Watch: Hurricane Sandy

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  • Tue, Oct 30, 2012 - 01:10pm

    #41

    thc0655

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    Philly relatively unscathed

Not so bad here in Philly.  Currently no rain and winds <10 mph.  We didn't lose power but 65,000 others in Philly did (585,000 in southeastern PA, 3 million in NJ/PA).  No tree damage at our house but an estimated 250 trees down in the city, some blocking streets.  Public transit is closed and evaluating their infrastructure for a hoped-for start up late today.  Airport closed, highways reopened.

  • Tue, Oct 30, 2012 - 02:32pm

    #42
    westcoastjan

    westcoastjan

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    kind of insensitive

Hey Woomera,

While I can understand the sentiments you express, I really do not think this is the correct moment to express them. This is an unprecendeted tragedy for this part of the world, and saying the equivalent of mine is bigger than yours lacks some tact. 

This is still unfolding and the category is irrelvant at this point. What is relevant is that many lives have been lost, and the recovery will be far more complex, expensive and long lasting than most can even imagine at this point.

Perhaps somewhere down the road might be an appropriate time to compare notes, but this is not it.

Jan

 

  • Tue, Oct 30, 2012 - 03:34pm

    #43
    Chris Martenson

    Chris Martenson

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    All is fine here

Much to my surprise we retained power throughout and did not suffer a single tree down in my immediate neighborhood.  I guess all the storms of the past year took out the weak ones?

Of course the storm pretty much skipped us by staying south and then heading west, so perhaps this is a false impression.

I am quite happy to not be struggling with loss and damage at this point and certainly know that millions have a lot of work in front of them to clean up and rebuild.  They have my best thoughts and wishes.

The transit situation in NYC is going to be a real mess for a while, no question about that.  Several subway tunnels are completely flooded and will have to be pumped dry and then have all the electronic components – switches and sensors and pumps and such – replaced and/or repaired.

I am still trying to get info on the refinery situation(s) but have not found any good info yet.

  • Tue, Oct 30, 2012 - 03:46pm

    #44
    Doug

    Doug

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    misunderstanding

woomera wrote:

G’Day, I truely feel sorry for any destruction and loss of life, but really, it was just a category 1. Just a good wet in Oz. Katrina was a category 2. Now, that’s starting to become a worry. Just have a squiz at a real storm: http://www.australiangeographic.com.au/journal/timeline-australias-worst&#8230; Because 50 million people aren’t in harms way like Sandy was in Oz, you never really hear or remember the really BIG ones. Everyone should just be grateful Sandy wasn’t worse. Regards, Woomera

The problems here that don’t apply under “normal” circumstances were many.  First, this wasn’t just a cat 1 hurricane, it was more accurately compared to the “perfect storm” portrayed in the movie of the same name.  It was at least two large systems merging in ways that were at once unpredictable, duplicative and unprecendented.  This time of year hurricanes don’t hit the areas impacted by this storm.  It was only because of the other weather system that Sandy took a turn toward NJ and once on land took another turn north.  Also, the eye hit land at about the same time as high tide.  Although winds in excess of 80 mph took out a lot of trees, it was the storm surge that caused most of the damage.

The effects are also uncharacteristic of hurricanes.  Two ft of snow in the Appalachian Mountains is one aberration.  Another was surfing in Chicago. 

It isn’t just Australia that can easily brush off a cat 1 hurricane in areas accustomed to hurricanes, the US does it with some regularity in more southern areas of the country.

On a side note, fortunately, the 20 ft waves predicted for Lake Ontario never materialized.  10 ft were about as big as they got and the shoreline development was prepared for that.  It was largely a non-event in western NY. cool

Doug

 

  • Tue, Oct 30, 2012 - 04:24pm

    #45

    RJE

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    Jan, I concur.In our neck of

Jan, I concur.

In our neck of the woods it is a normal transition from fall to winter so nothing unusual for us Michiganders.

I appreciate at least from the writings here that things are bad but not as bad as was understood from this part of the country. The loss of life is tragic and felt. I am so sorry for any loss that may have been experienced by anyone here at PP as I have affections for you all.

I haven’t heard yet from Jim H. there in New York and would be relieve to hear something. If you are out there Jim just a little note would be appreciated.

BOB 

  • Tue, Oct 30, 2012 - 05:02pm

    #46

    jtwalsh

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    storm watch

Our little part of south east New England came through with not too much damage.  We are thirty miles inland.  Along the coast there were considerable problems with storm surge and loss of power.  For me the incredible aspect of this storm was its size and its power over such a large area.  Normally we would follow the storm’s path hoping to be forty or fifty miles away from the center.  We were well over two hundred miles from landfall in this storm and still were in the affected zone.  Hurricane Irene was similar in that we were over one hundred miles away but still suffered damage and loss of power for a week.  It really seems that the storms are getting bigger and more powerful than they were in the past.

  • Tue, Oct 30, 2012 - 06:22pm

    #47
    Br3dS01

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    Sandy – East Coast Refineries

I thought the following we’re pretty informative… Brad S

Oct 29:
 
Two-thirds of East Coast refiners shutting as Sandy nears http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/29/us-storm-sandy-refining-idUSBRE89S0K920121029
 
UPDATE 4-Sandy cuts E. Coast fuel supply; refiners, pipelines shut http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/29/storm-sandy-refining-idUSL1E8LS1OU20121029
 
Oct 30:
 
Outages, floods hit two New Jersey refineries; others restart http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/10/30/us-storm-sandy-refining-idUSBRE89T0A120121030
 
  • Wed, Oct 31, 2012 - 04:06am

    #48

    Tom Page

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    NYSE shutdown

Any significant impact from having Wall Street shutdown the last couple days?  Life seems to have gone on fine around here regardless.

  • Wed, Oct 31, 2012 - 07:14am

    #49
    Bradford

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    Melisa Francis on Fox

…I just listened the Melisa Francis on Fox Business tonight: http://www.foxbusiness.com/on-air/money-with-melissa-francis/index.html

She posited that this 100/yr. storm will be, and has already been, an economic boom for the economy.

Her guests didn’t quite share her enthusiasam.

  • Wed, Oct 31, 2012 - 10:35am

    #50
    ao

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    the morons are multiplying

Bradford wrote:

…I just listened the Melisa Francis on Fox Business tonight: http://www.foxbusiness.com/on-air/money-with-melissa-francis/index.html

She posited that this 100/yr. storm will be, and has already been, an economic boom for the economy.

Her guests didn’t quite share her enthusiasam.

This woman is an absolute twit as are all those of her ilk who think disasters are good for the economy.  I’d like to see that group all emigrate to an island and be joined with the Keynesian economists of the world.  Then I’d like to see the island sink beneath the sea and while these disaster economists and the Keynesian economists are treading water, they can be discussing among themselves how great their plight is for the economy and how they can buy their way out of this situation with all the funny money this economic boom generates.  Such an event would only be good for the human gene pool.

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