Square Foot Gardening?

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  • Wed, Jul 20, 2011 - 12:08am

    #121

    Travlin

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    There’s more

His name is Gordo Gamsby. He was clowning it up in that video.  He does sword swallowing and other sideshow acts.  http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=Gordo+Gamsby&aq=f  That’s enough thread jacking for now.

Travlin

 

  • Wed, Jul 20, 2011 - 01:11am

    #122

    Johnny Oxygen

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    Re: 2011 Square Foot Garden World Cup – Peppers v. Dogs

Hey Dogs

Do you know antyhing about growing these peppers. I’m getting conflicting reports. Some say they are very difficult and some say they are not.

 

Yes. They are called Peter Peppers.

  • Wed, Jul 20, 2011 - 02:41pm

    #123

    Dogs_In_A_Pile

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    Next Year’s Garden

[quote=Johnny Oxygen]

Hey Dogs

Do you know antyhing about growing these peppers. I’m getting conflicting reports. Some say they are very difficult and some say they are not.

 

Yes. They are called Peter Peppers.

[/quote]

JO2 –

I’m not growing these this year but may try some next year.  I have a friend who is growing them here in Virginia and she said they were pretty easy to grow.  She calls them “Willy Chilis”.

I haven’t tried them yet but am looking forward to it.  They fall between jalapenos and tabascos on the Scoville scale but apparently the range is pretty wide.  My luck I’d get the 5 CEP outlier that pushes 100,000 SHU!!

  • Tue, Aug 09, 2011 - 06:37pm

    #124
    joemanc

    joemanc

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    Growing Corn in a SFG

Anyone growing corn in a SFG? We had a pretty good rainstorm Saturday night along with just enough wind that a lot of my younger corn plants got tilted over. I know the soil is very loose and was afraid this might happen, and it did. Do I need to plant the seeds deeper? Or give the plants some support so they don’t get blown over? I did try that actually, but only around the box and not in between the grid. Maybe it’s just not worth the hassle and I need to plant corn in regular garden soil?

  • Tue, Aug 09, 2011 - 06:44pm

    #125

    Wendy S. Delmater

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    corn in an SFG box

I’ve not done corn in an SFG box but this year we did sunflowers. The book, SF Gardening, says to only support it around the sides. That proved inadequate for the sunflowers, but my SFG was only 6" deep. Still, after that I’m inclined to plant my corn in bare soil.

  • Sat, Aug 13, 2011 - 03:25am

    #126

    Tom Page

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    Growing Corn in a SFG

I stick to smaller veggies like beets, onions, lettuce, carrots, and spinach that benifit from an organized SFG and raised beds.  In other areas that are just fields or hills of compost I rotate corn, potatoes, and squash/pumpkins, which all need lots of room and do just as well in good garden soil.  Bush (determinant) tomatoes too.

  • Tue, Aug 23, 2011 - 01:15pm

    #127

    Wendy S. Delmater

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    First, the good news. Two

First, the good news. Two years ago this yard was a wasteland of weeds. But now…


Counterclockwise from lower left: Cabbages and pole beans on netting, newly replanted lettuce bed, zucchini and dill, the "Bonsai" peach tree,  peanuts, sunflowers and cherry tomatoes, sweet potatoes, carrots & Swiss chard and plum tomatoes, and an herb box. There are basil and zinnias in the center of the photo and morning glories starting to climb the clothesline pole in front of them. (Behind the okra you cannot see the jalapenos and the bell peppers. But they are there).


Front to back – left side: Broccoli, beets and basil, limas, radishes and marigolds, beefsteak tomatoes, cucumbers, and turnips.
Right side: hand-made solar drying rack full of figs with the beehives (not occupied – yet) way behind them. Off camera to the right of this is the well and the firewood stack. Our next big project is a pump house for the well.


Side view. Basil and limas in the foreground, and the chair is from my harvesting limas earlier today. From this angle you can see the two new blueberry bushes in gallon pots to the right of the burn barrel, and the peppers. Wayyy in the back under that large pine tree is the 22-ft box  long where I grow things needing partial or full shade. Sweet peas and leaf lettuces love that box. There are a few black-eyed pea plants in full sun to the left of it along the fence – an experiment.

We also have pole green beans and a white mulberry (not fruiting, I may have to take it down), and the cold hardy orange tree on the side of the house, plus a beach rose (for rose hips) and Indian hawthorns (ornamental and medicinal) in the front. Plus the fig bush tree, which has simply gone berserk and is now 10-ft tall.

The oscillating sprinkler to keep this all watered was the smartest thing I did this year.

And now, the bad news. While we are learning what works and does not work in  our climate and soil, and we have had enormous success with certain crops, if we all we had was this garden to feed ourselves…we’d be dead. One cannot live on what we’ve produced so far, although I hasten to add that yeilds are WAY up as we ramp up the learning curve. Still, it’s an excellent supplenent to our diet, and the cost is going down as we save seed and replant it.

Example: experimenting with green beans has not gotten us the perfect bean(s) for our yard yet. I had great hopes fort he Kentucky Blue snap beans: a cross between Kentucky Wonder pole beans and Blue Lake bush beans sounded good. It wasn’t. We got a lot of leaves a, very few beans, & first-time aphids on our snap beans. Next I’m trying a southern heirloom variety of beans – "greasy" or hairless, shiny green beans that resist transpiration and are drought-resistant.

Lessons learned. General lesson? Experiment. Expand on success. Concentrate on what works in your area, and pay particular attention to legumes, tummy-fillers, strong seasoning tastes, and starches. Our initial success with lima beans last year made them our bean of choice, with peanuts as a backup. We got the spacing right (planting limas and peanuts three inches apart means no weeds) and yeilds soared. As for starches, last year’s SFG sweet potato travesties were not repeated (planting yams in loose, friable soil meant three-foot, half-inch thick snake-shaped yams – who knew?) but we have not dug up the ones we planted in sandly clay soil yet (they seem healthy enough).  In what I call the tummy-fillers department our okra, cabbages, radishes and lettuce win. In the "strong seasonging tastes" department, we had great sucess with garlic, jalapenos, dill, bergamot, and basil. Not with onions. I am open to suggestion here, but for now I laid in a bunch of dehydrated onion just in case.

We did not repeat the mistake of not thinning the carrots. Bad idea, people: they need an inch of space around them to grow properly. This year, yeilds are way up.

Plant what you like. We planted parsnips last year. Sure, they overwintered just fine, but the strong taste was nasty. Carrots overwintered just as well under a layer of mulch, and we will actually enjoy those. We also love a paticular variety of cos (loose Romaine) lettuce: Jericho. It loves our garden and loves us back.

Give up and buy what you cannot grow. Beets? This year I gave up. Celery? Ditto for now.

 

  • Tue, Nov 15, 2011 - 12:04am

    #128
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Mid-November and still gardening

Well, well, it’s my 1st year ever gardening and I’m using SFG and here it is, mid-November in southern New England and I am still harvesting kale and swiss chard. And this, after we had a whopper of a snowstorm in late October that buried my garden under a foot of heavy, wet snow, followed by several nights of temps well down in to the 20’s. Not bad for a rookie! Hopefully I can inspire others to try gardening and to extend their growing seasons…

  • Tue, May 22, 2012 - 08:44pm

    #129
    FarmerBob12

    FarmerBob12

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    Found a cool web app for square foot gardening

 I’ve been trying to find an app for gardening the square foot method for a while now and I think I might have found something pretty useful. Smartgardener.com just came out with a new “add on” to its online application that lets you map out your garden with suggested square foot spacings and even has cool little structures for trellises, cages and other types of support. 

 

It’s also a plus that the website sends reminders for my garden tasks and has a huge database of all the growing info I would ever want about the plants I’m growing, even down to the variety level. I’m going to give this a try this summer and then reply back with my experience with it and I’d like to hear some feedback from others about this app and other apps that are useful for growing a lot of food quickly in small spaces. 

So far I’ve planted my Butternut Squash and Melons that will grow on supports w slings, and I’m doing 3 cherry tomatoes from starts I grew indoors using the square foot intensive spacing and raised beds filled with our city’s municipal compost and organic potting soil.

  • Tue, May 29, 2012 - 01:03am

    #130
    SimonR4

    SimonR4

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    An Update on my Square Foot Garden and Aquaponics

Having attended the Chris and Becca weekend seminar at Rowe Massachusetts, I came home and expanded my SFG and Aquaponics set ups.

Rather than repeat the postings, the link to the Rowe Seminar Forum with my 5 postings is http://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/rowe-2012-seminar-forum/72891?page=1…

Here is just one of the photos of my SFG

Simon

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