Some frank thoughts from a millennial

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  • Thu, Oct 24, 2019 - 07:58pm

    #21
    ao

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    it's all about energy

Energy is one of the 3Es we investigate on this site and Chris has repeatedly made a sound case for the primacy of energy.  For the sake of this thread though, I’m going to approach the subject of energy from a different perspective.  What I’d like to examine is personal energy.  Person energy (or for the sake of our discussion here, simply ‘energy’) is probably one of the most important psychological and physiological attributes you can cultivate for resilience, whether to simply survive or to thrive.  To a certain extent, it is determined genetically but that considerable portion of it that is determined environmentally is cultivated by optimizing your health.  Optimizing your health comes from (1) nutrition, (2) exercise, and (3) psychoemotional state.

Whether you’re in the deep woods or in the deep concrete canyons of Manhattan, survival takes energy.  I remember taking a survival course with Tom Brown and he emphasized that survival is hard work and it is.  We often hear how the indigenous people of the Amazon only work for about 4 hours per day to sustain themselves and then spend the remainder of their time in leisure and rest.  Don’t you believe it!  And the 4 hours they are working is hard work.  A friend of mine who did missionary work in the jungles of French Guiana described his time living with the indigenous people there.  He was in top physical shape, a college football player and multi-sport athlete used to hard physical work doing construction for summer jobs.  Yet when he was hunting monkeys with the men, for example, even after his acclimation to the climate, he was absolutely exhausted dealing with the combination of heat, humidity, insects, vegetation, terrain, and running after the game.

A lot of one’s success in life, regardless of how one defines success, is predicated on one’s energy level.  Energy is necessarily to work long and work hard.  Generally, the harder one works and the longer one works, the quicker one can achieve their goals, whether it’s building a homestead or planting a food forest or building a portfolio or running an organization.  Energy is needed for physical work and the stamina to keep going while not sacrificing the quality of your work, such as when building a house.  Energy is needed for mental work so you can concentrate for long periods of time and not loose your focus.

In fact, I’m hard pressed to think of any aspect of your resilience that is not improved by improving your energy levels.  As such, one should assign a top priority to proper nutrition and proper exercise (including aerobic, strength, power, flexibility, balance, coordination, and, although it’s generally overlooked, functional relaxation exercises), and also to cultivating a calm, relaxed, balanced psychoemotional state by such things as study, contemplation, practice, meditation, prayer, etc.  The latter improves your health, your efficiency, and your ability to withstand stress and endure hardship.  And your psychoemotional state is contingent upon getting high quality rest/sleep.  You can neglect rest in short term emergency situations but there is always a health price to pay if you dare to neglect it over the long term.  If you don’t have energy and your health, it is very difficult to reach your highest potential in whatever area you may choose to direct your life.

In summary, whatever your concerns may be for the future and whatever path you follow, one of your first and highest priorities should be cultivating the necessary energy to do whatever you wish to do.  This is true, regardless of one’s generation and interests.

  • This reply was modified 3 months, 3 weeks ago by  ao.
  • Thu, Oct 24, 2019 - 08:24pm   (Reply to #15)

    #22
    vlierheimer

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    re: A Little Rant. to that and to ao

Hi gang,

So, this is actually both a reply to Eric, ao, and some of the other posters here. First off, the easy stuff. Thanks for the kind words, ao, walking a with a good man to his cancer death at 44 was the hardest thing I’ve ever done. The best word to describe how I got through this difficult time was ‘community’. Adam and Chris have spent considerable time exploring this topic, and this is very valuable.

In my considerable experience in the vast population of cancer families, truly the only way we can navigate this is with the help of others. My community was faith based. I developed considerable anger at God for the excruciating death of my husband, and the damage it inflicted on our four teenage children. During this time, my community cleaned my house, cooked meals for us, helped me run my children to practices and doctor visits,  and provided all kinds of necessary help. This was a lifesaving buoy.

ao also makes the relevant point about insurance. In a previous post I outlined a couple of rental properties we had purchased. We also had health insurance with excellent coverage, and something called ‘key man insurance’. Chris was the head of our family business, and key man insurance kicked in when a doctor signed a note stating that he could perform less than half of his job due to illness. This form of insurance covered one third of our budget. The rentals covered another third, and I had to increase my work schedule for the rest. Had we not given thought to this form of ‘prepping’, and had we not our community, I would have been crushed.

When the disease took his body, I used the life insurance (5x his annual income, a little thin, these days) to pay off the mortgage and make progress on another rental.

ao is correct, do not ignore insurance, especially if dependents are in the picture.

Eric and other millennial readers, I might suggest questioning some of the foundational assumptions you were taught by your boomer or X-er parents. PP is very good for that, with the OPs emphasis on declining resources.
In another post, I mentioned that we had trained our kids in low-consumption, high conservation lifestyle early. All of my kids have been through Martenson’s Crash Course as well. This combination now yields some very interesting discussions. Here are some suggestions from those for your own consideration

1) Does every generation HAVE to have a higher standard of living than the previous one? Why or why not?

2) Have you learned the difference between a want and a need in your adult life? What is that difference? How are you meeting your needs? How are you paying cash for your wants?

3) In the practical domain, how is your credit management going? Do you pay off your plastic every single month? If not, where are those lovely melted plastic sculptures Mom taught you how to make with your destroyed credit cards? 😉

Millennial friends, I often review with my kids a foundational idea. Why on earth pay attention to budgeting, investments, and all things financial?

Anyone? Why, it’s so you can clear your mental decks for the important stuff, of course.

It’s not rocket science, millennial friends. Pick through all of the wealth of resources here, spend a few years defining your own priorities and getting things under control, and then go where your heart lies.

Warm regards! 🙂

By the way, you’re not a ‘whiny little doomer millennial jerk’ lol. Great turn of phrase, that. 🙂

You’re a person with some really great questions, and I suspect you’re on a journey of self-discovery and defining your own priorities. I would also suspect that your parents are like all of MY peers, and have likely fallen down on the job of training you, God bless ’em.

Friend, you sound like a smart one. Dig around here for the resources to help you outline what you want your life to be like. Taggart has a book out about ‘authentic careers’ if that interests you, and foundational organization tools like Dave Ramsey’s budgeting guides abound. Start buying an ounce or two of silver right now, and start to get organized. I’d love to see where you are five years from now.

Warm regards!

V

 

  • Thu, Oct 24, 2019 - 09:27pm

    #24
    ao

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    this is gold

Millennial friends, I often review with my kids a foundational idea. Why on earth pay attention to budgeting, investments, and all things financial?

Anyone? Why, it’s so you can clear your mental decks for the important stuff, of course.

vlierheimer,

Have you ever considered developing an online course for parents to learn how to educate their children in the practical aspects of life?  I think you have potential gold with your approach!

  • Thu, Oct 24, 2019 - 10:44pm

    #25

    davefairtex

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    finding your way

Ok, so the future won’t be the same.  You guys can’t blindly just follow the same-old boring, formulaic recipe from birth through death that we did.  (“Not dead yet”, though)

Even we who were born during the “easy times” of the cold war, we still had our collection of choices to make.  Here’s what I found to be the technique that worked the best for me.

Maybe ao would call it prayer, I call it listening to your inner nature.  Who is right?  That’s above my pay grade.  At the merely physical level, your consciousness has a whole lot more information aggregated than you understand.  It has already done the math: what you are good at, what you like doing, what the opportunities are, what’s more likely to work out.  What might be fun, engaging, a good experience, a match for what you want in life.  But if you are scared of the future, you cannot hear the message that consciousness is always waiting to give you.

We are here for the experience.  If we were just focused on moving from life to death, why bother with the journey?  Just die now!  Save time & effort!  No.  We are here for the journey.  Its probably a good idea to focus on now, because that’s where you are.

As for the path -choose the one that feels as though it resonates best.  More likely than not, it will lead somewhere interesting.  When I was an undergrad, I asked for guidance.  I was torn.  From the classes I took, I knew that I loved history most.  Computer science I liked much less, and my grades were terrible – although I liked writing code.  I was shown two future paths: pick history, I’d have fun, college would be easy, but I’d be poor.  Computer science: struggle through college, but I’d have fun later, and I wouldn’t be poor.  “What do you want?”  Given I was not born into great wealth, I chose comp sci and it has been great – although it did take 6 years for me to get through.  Now I do history for fun.  There are choices like this all through life.  Ask to be shown the future.  Ask to see the movie.  Then you can pick.

Shit really works.  But you can’t be “in fear” when you ask.  Be at a receptive place of neutrality.  Then ask.  Once you see the movie, it will make the path less of a fear journey.

Also, several times I have been “nudged” during my life to change my track. “You need to leave San Diego now.”  “But why?  I’m having such a good time?”  “Its time for you to go.”  And I went.  It has always worked out.  Angels?  Guides?  Who knows.  I only get the messages when I am not in fear though.  And I had to listen, and trust, and go with it.

If you are religious, then pray for guidance.  If you are not religious, then start working at trusting that your inner nature has already done the math – because it has a lifetime of information that it has already integrated at a level way below conscious understanding.  If you are spiritual, then meditate – release fear – tune into source, and ask to see your possible futures.  Then pick one that feels best.

Feeling is your no-bullshit truth meter.  Feeling is the aggregated super-complicated subconscious math that your inner nature has boiled down into a form simple enough for you to receive and process in real time.  Feeling is why Tom didn’t go down that dark alley and wind up dead.  Feeling is why I ended up slogging through undergrad CS and eventually made it through.

The millenial group is fortunate enough to be born into a much more receptive time.  Things are a lot more touchy-feely.  That has some really good aspects to it.  Make use of it.  It took me a long time to get there, and only after a lot of experiences that showed me that it really works.  You should be able to get there a lot faster than I did.

And – we spend a lot more time on the journey than we do at the destination.  Might as well enjoy it!  And you will receive better information if you don’t get stuck in fear for too long.

  • Fri, Oct 25, 2019 - 06:36am

    #26
    spencer91189

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    A few responses

Thanks again to any who read and thought about my ideas here.

Nick Adams, thanks for voicing your agreement! I need to look at that post about building a homestead myself, it seems germaine.

Dave, I really liked your above post! This is sort of the process that led me to up and quit massaging and leave Pittsburgh, and I will try to continue using as much of my consciousness as possible in the future to guide me.

vlierheimer, your question, does each generation have to have a higher standard of living than previous ones, is one I’ve grappled with and discussed with my parents. They appear to have always assumed the answer was yes (if you follow the middle class Plan), but my experiences disagree. Something else you said that struck me. You said we have to worry about all things finance to make room for the important things. I think this is another way of saying that our society has it totally backwards, forcing everyone to put the cart of finances and money before the horse of what humans actually consider important. Maybe other societies who focused on totally different things, such as the many that never used money for example, had a better idea here?

ao, I found your comments about massage therapy pretty condescending and unhelpful. I didn’t quit because it wasn’t paying enough, and in the clinic where I worked and managed I was constantly scrambling to employ more therapists to fill demand. I would suggest that you should not tell (former) professionals, in a field you never worked in, about their business, if you want them to take you seriously.

I obviously put little detail in my post about exactly what is wrong with capitalism, and I’m not really the best one to write that book anyway. But in response to ao’s straw man, I never said capitalism caused all wars, or all human problems, although I would compare it to religion in many ways. But I think it’s pretty obvious that in the period since about 1492, give or take, our “Western” type societies, internalizing the ideas involved in capitalism – the extraction of wealth from the natural world and other people to build personal fortunes (using capital) – have done more damage to the earth than any other humans, to the point that I think many would agree that human societies can now truly pose a threat to our own existence. I’m not looking for “all good and no bad” as you said, but rather something not as demonstrably, awfully bad.

ao also asked, if I start a business and don’t want to follow a capitalist system, what would I do instead? While I don’t think he is really interested in my business plans, this is exactly the issue I was trying to raise – this is NOT a hypothetical, it is a real question that is being asked by many people. We need to talk about alternatives to the ideology, capitalism, that has such a grip on people like you, they can’t even imagine anything else working for people. One obvious alternative, that formed the basis of almost every human society that has ever existed, would be some form of communal living, at a much, much smaller scale than current societies. For a contemporary discussion of this topic I suggest Rob O’Grady’s book from Orlov Press, 150 Strong.

Second to last ao, (can you tell you got me a bit steamed?) that post by Curtis Stone is completely straw-manning permaculture, written by someone who is trying to get people to pay him to learn his methods of making big profits selling vegetables. Rather than listen to a self-described failed permaculturist like Curtis, I would suggest people who are actually interested learn from successful practitioners, of which there are many, including for example Richard Perkins. Here is is his response to Curtis:

Finally ao, you say that there is a reason indigenous cultures were supplanted by more modern systems. Pray tell, what is that reason? I would suggest it is mostly because they were unwilling and/or unable to utterly destroy their environment and their neighboring fellow humans for personal profit, among many more obvious historical factors including diseases and other topics discussed in books like Guns Germs and Steel. Here’s a hypothetical question for you ao: if humans were successful at wiping our own species off the planet, with nuclear war say, would you consider that to be an evolution over the lower tech indigenous cultures that endured for thousands of years longer than our own society?

  • Fri, Oct 25, 2019 - 11:27am   (Reply to #26)

    #27
    ao

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    take a breath Spencer

ao, I found your comments about massage therapy pretty condescending and unhelpful. I didn’t quit because it wasn’t paying enough, and in the clinic where I worked and managed I was constantly scrambling to employ more therapists to fill demand. I would suggest that you should not tell (former) professionals, in a field you never worked in, about their business, if you want them to take you seriously.

Actually Spencer, I was working in the field before you were born.  I’m sure you’re familiar with myofascial release.  You probably think John Barnes developed it?  But he got both the name and some of the techniques from Robert Ward who taught it through the Michigan State Osteopathic School.  The other techniques, along with their names, were taken from Alan Grodin and Gregg Johnson.  You’re probably familiar with craniosacral therapy as well.  You probably think John Upledger developed it?  But he learned most of it from the Michigan State Osteopathic School and the work of Sutherland and his successors.  So I worked in the field, I educated thousands of others in the field, and I’ve seen the handwriting on the wall about future prospects for prosperity among the majority in the profession.  Watch and see.  By the way, why did you decide not to continue in the profession?

In terms of economic systems, I think you’re making mistakes common to almost every generation, including my own.  You fail to study and understand history in sufficient depth and learn from the past.  And so you repeat the paths and the mistakes of the past.  The Fourth Turning addresses this issue to some extent.  Read Chinese history alone and you’ll find that, in their thousands of years of existence, almost every economic system and social arrangement was tried at one time or another.  And whatever they didn’t try was done by the Sumerians, Minoans, Phoenicians, Persians, Babylonians, Israelites, Greeks, Romans, Vikings, Mongols, and many others.  Each one had its day and each one eventually fell on its face, for the reason described in my previous post.  Back in the 1970s, I was seriously interested in the issue of a steady state economy versus the infinite growth economies we see today.  The problem is, you have to change human nature to get that to happen.  Who knows, with genetic alteration and transhumanism, that may very well happen some day.  Somehow I don’t think it’s going to work out very well though.

With regards to communal living, you realize, of course, that this has been tried throughout the millennia but never with much longstanding success, again, largely due to human nature.  The early Christians lived communally and shared everything.   It was very nice while it lasted but it didn’t last very long.  With my generation in the 1960s, many went off to live in hippie communes.  Again, they didn’t last too long.  In fact, a lot of those hippies became boomer entrepreneurs and politicians with too many of them unfortunately making a 180 degree turn from their former idealism and faux integrity.  Religious groups and New Age groups in particular have embraced communal living but communal living and working arrangements obviously existed for a time in the Soviet Union and still exist in Israel in kibbutzim but all of these have their problems and most have faded away.  You think that capitalism caused most of the problems in the modern world but I think that human herd-like behavior has been even more problematic.  To each their own.

With regards to indigenous people, again Spencer, you may wish to expand your study of history.  Long before white Europeans ever came to North America, Native American tribes were raiding one another, raping, torturing, mutilating, enslaving, and killing one another.  Such activities included smashing infants’ skulls against trees.  They did it to one another and they did it later to white settlers and much more.  It was not Disney’s Pocahontas of all rainbows and unicorns.  Some Native American tribes like the Iroquois even practiced cannibalism.  Did you know that the Inuits killed off the native peoples who were in Greenland before them?  So they knew a little bit something about genocide.  A certain group of indigenous people in New Guinea valued treachery as one of the most valued character traits and ate the decaying flesh of their dead relatives.  Cannibalism, of course, was widely practiced around the world by indigenous peoples, from the Maori in New Zealand to many African tribes on the opposite side of the world.  In terms of environment, do you recall how Plains Indians would run herds of buffalo off a cliff to mass slaughter?  What about the indigenous people of Easter Island?  There is evidence all around the world of deforestation and environmental degradation brought about by indigenous peoples at the small scale at which they operated.  And how would you like a penal system where someone buried you up to your neck, propped your mouth open with sticks, and left a trail of honey leading into your mouth so the ants slowly ate you alive from the inside out?  These and many other penal delights showed that the Europeans did not have a monopoly on cruel and unusual punishments.

I understand your idealism and your desire to see better systems come into play but don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater.  Better to learn from the mistakes and wisdom of your elders than to repeat the mistakes and disregard the wisdom.

In response to your last question, no, of course not.

And being a pragmatic person, I’d ask you, how’s this all working out for you so far?  If you’re going to open a business, you better have a solid plan in place, not just talk about alternatives and communal living.  Believe it or not, I really am sincerely interested in how you’re going to approach this.  I’m here on this site to learn and that includes learning from you.

 

  • This reply was modified 3 months, 3 weeks ago by  ao.
  • Fri, Oct 25, 2019 - 11:57am   (Reply to #25)

    #28
    ao

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    more gold

Especially this:

 But if you are scared of the future, you cannot hear the message that consciousness is always waiting to give you.

Fear is the enemy … always has been, always will be.  Hence my post about the relationship between energy and health and psychoemotional status.  It doesn’t matter if you’re a pacificist or a warrior, conquering fear is paramount but also a lifelong struggle.  You need that firm foundation to build on.

 

  • Sun, Oct 27, 2019 - 08:04am

    #30
    spencer91189

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    Apologies

ao, I feel dumb enough for assuming you never massaged to apologize. I should have realized from how you kept talking about energy that you had been doing some kind of “energy work”. I quit because I didn’t want to be a service-provider anymore, I want to be a producer.

As for the rest, I just want to say a few things at present, influenced a lot by Daniel Quinn’s book Ishmael which I just reread:

-History did not begin at Sumer. Humans have been anatomically modern way, way longer than that, and almost the entire time was spent in small bands and tribes, and these were communal. In fact, humans were so successful at this living arrangement that humans came to occupy the whole earth, evolved to become conscious, and did all sorts of amazing things that Taker culture can’t explain or don’t even know about because it’s not in “our history”.

Further, whatever else you think about these humans, they were not pursuing infinite growth. While they expanded to fill their niche, like any other species, these humans were what Quinn calls Leavers. They did not possess the idea that humans should conquer nature and wipe out all species that compete with our food. They did not claim to possess, “knowledge of who should live and who should die.” So it is not that human nature is to pursue infinite growth, it has only been the nature of the Taker culture for say, 10,000 years. I don’t want to be a part of that culture!

-What a grotesque list of indigenous sins you listed for us. It reads like an apologist for European genocide, honestly. I have read whole books about Native American tortures, but probably wouldn’t bring the methods up in conversation because it’s nasty. The thing about Greenland is new to me though, so thanks for the tip. I wonder how many thousands lived there however, compared to everywhere Europeans colonized…

Finger-pointing at genocide victims aside, I never said we should live exactly like indigenous cultures, I said we have a lot to learn from them because their Leaver cultures, again, lasted a lot longer on this earth than this one has or appears able to.

I don’t think the house of history you have been studying has a firm foundation. To quote Graham Hancock, I think the house of history in general has a foundation of sand, and humans of the dominant culture today are like a species with amnesia. But without diving too deep there, I think you should be more aware of the bias inherent in reading the “victorious” Taker account of history. Maybe look more at some anthropology, like Graeber whom I mentioned earlier.

Regarding my plans, I think co-ops are great and am interested in that business model specifically, when it’s bigger than just myself. I think a major issue is the scale we live at now, again going back to 150 Strong. I am not saying that if I can’t live in a commune I won’t run a business. Mostly my point is that the dominant discussion of how we should live that I see on this site whines about the status quo, but aims to live completely within it still, paying only occasional lip-service to root causes, like when Daniel Quinn was on that super awkward podcast with us here shortly before he died.

Generally though like I pointed out, markets don’t need capitalism, or even money. Capitalism is an ideology, not a practice, and it does not follow that if we drop the ideology we can’t have commerce. I think a lot of this has to do with the intention of the ones running the business more than anything. I really mean no offense here, but I’m not getting the sense that you are the best person with whom to try and hash out my business plan, but rest-assured I am doing so.

 

 

 

 

  • Sun, Oct 27, 2019 - 02:10pm   (Reply to #30)

    #31
    ao

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    not a problem

Spencer,

Not a problem with the massage misunderstanding.  I did massage and a lot more, massage being one of many tools useful for bringing a person to an improved state of health.  I can understand wanting to be a producer rather than a service provider.  The results are more tangible, for one.

I haven’t read Daniel Quinn’s book but I will check it out, when I’m done with the lineup of about a half dozen I’m working on.  Yes, history did not begin at Sumer. I hope I didn’t imply that. I’ve long been interested in the Atlantean civilization, Lemuria, the 100,000 year old evidence of the Anunnaki in Africa, evidence of ancient nuclear blast sites in Indian, the Menehune in Hawaii, you name it.  We are not the first to attain a high state of civilization on the planet.  Edgar Cayce’s work suggests the Atlanteans were more advanced than us but made serious spiritual mistakes, the same ones we seem to be regrettably working on so diligently.  The tribal unit of about 150 individuals has become romanticized in recent years but that social organization did not seem to be any better at eliminating warring over resources with rival tribes.  It’s just that the social organization units was smaller so they couldn’t do as much damage as now.  Frankly, I don’t think their mindset was appreciably different at its core than our society’s.  But the scale of their technology was smaller and less sophisticated so they couldn’t take as much.  Also, do you think you would like to live in a society where you were largely limited to the mental and physical inputs of only 150 individuals?

While you say they were not pursuing infinite growth (and it may very well be true that they did not have infinite growth as an expressed conscious goal), at the same time, you correctly noted that they expanded to fill their niche.  So they expanded up to the limits of their technology at the time. They were pursuing growth, at least as evidenced by their actions.  Yes, it’s not human nature to pursue infinite growth.  I doubt the majority in our present culture have that mindset either. But it is human nature to be selfish and the drive towards infinite growth derives from that selfishness.  To deny that would be to imply that the conflicts in primitive cultures came about not from covetousness (for land, food, material, women, what have you) but from getting enjoyment from fighting, killing, and otherwise creating mayhem.  I don’t think the latter was the case, at least not the majority of the time.

Yes, the Native Americans did have a tremendous list of sins … but so did everyone else!  I did not state what I stated to condemn Native Americans.  They were no better or worse than anyone else.  In fact, it’s pretty hard to find any group of people on earth who at one time or another did not do terrible things to another group.  I stated what I stated to counter the popular but false narrative that has arisen of “red man all good, white man all bad”. In so far as “our history”, I quite agree with the deficiencies in our society’s knowledge and education in history.  There was not a single time in my education (and I received what is considered to a “good” one), was I ever educated in Asian history. for example.  How can one fully understand the world and its history if one has never learned Asia’s contribution (or the contribution of any other area or people that is non-European)?  It obviously isn’t possible.

In terms of learning from indigenous cultures, of course we have things we can learn from them.  But is there a culture on the planet that we can’t learn something from?  I just don’t hold them up above other cultures.  I look at them all as equal, each with their virtues and their flaws, each with their lessons to teach us.

I am fully cognizant that history is written by the victors.  And I understand the bias inherent in history because there is no historian without bias, either implicit or explicit.  I also realize that cultures that have an oral history tradition are at a distinct disadvantage to cultures with a written history tradition.  And I recognize how the above puts indigenous cultures at a distinct disadvantage.  Anthropology is an interesting field and can indeed provide many insights but I’ve had enough conversations with a university professor in anthropology to realize that within anthropology, as within most other fields, there is an orthodoxy that eschews alternative views and punishes any potential violators of their unwritten code with academic and career sanctions of various kinds.  One has to be discerning as to where one gets one’s information and one often has to dig beneath the surface of the purported truth to obtain a more balanced view of reality.

I think the definition of capitalism has evolved over time, like the word ‘gay’, to be something different from what was originally intended.  Strictly speaking, when I studied economics, capitalism was an economic system with the means of production, distribution, and exchange in the hands of the individual (rather than owned by the state or owned by the public communally).  Due to distortions and corruptions, however, it is increasingly viewed in a negative light by younger generations who never had to live in a communist or socialist system (and Scandinavia is economically most decidedly capitalistic dominant).  Humanity typically migrates from areas of lesser opportunity to areas of greater opportunity.  Hence, the preponderance of migration into capitalistic societies, not out of them.  A fellow Rutgers alumni had something profound to say on the issue of capitalism.

I’m a big fan of co-ops too, having belonged to a food co-op for over 25 years, but like anything else, they have their advantages and disadvantages.  I’ve noted that our co-op has gradually evolved to be increasingly profit driven and, as a result, I’ve been increasingly taking more of my business elsewhere.  In addition, I think that they are setting themselves up to be usurped by a more efficient business entity coming in with better prices and selections.  We’ll see.

As for your business plan, that’s your personal business so I can understand if you don’t want to share it.  But if you want to change the world, as you seem to want to do (and there’s nothing wrong with that, IF it’s for the better), keeping your light under a bushel seems counterproductive to your purposes, at least from my perspective.  I would think you would want to share it and see it proliferate.

Best of luck with your endeavors.

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