Investing in Precious Metals 101 Ad

Seeking Community Support for My Personal Weight-Loss Goals

Login or register to post comments Last Post 5706 reads   79 posts
Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 79 total)
  • Tue, Oct 08, 2013 - 08:54pm

    #11

    jtwalsh

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 01 2008

    Posts: 261

    count placeholder

    Up to the challenge

Adam:  I am really glad you brought this subject to the table.  Beginning at age 47, by following the Carbohydrate Addicts' Diet of Drs. Richard and Rachael Heller, and by walking (up to five miles per day at peak) I was able to  loose almost seventy pounds and get down to my college day's weight.  That was the healthiest period of my adult life.  I maintained that weight level for about seven years.  In recent years reoccurring health issues have limited my mobility and the weight has climbed back to old levels.

Recently I have been reviewing the different things I am doing to build a more sustainable life and my inner voice has been telling me the biggest change I have to make is in me.   I need to get working back to the health I enjoyed ten years ago.  Weight loss and exercise are at the core of that goal. 

I hope you folk keep coming back with success stories, advice and ideas.  It is much easier to keep to a goal if you feel others are out there working for the same thing.  I took a quick look at jgarma's web site and will be going back to review a number of his suggestions.

For those of you struggling with weight loss it can be done.  Keep a positive attitude and get back up and move forward if you fall.  (that last part was from me to me, but I thought I'd share it with you all.)

Looking forward to support and advice.  jt

  • Tue, Oct 08, 2013 - 09:22pm

    #12

    Greg Snedeker

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 22 2012

    Posts: 380

    count placeholder

    Establish a Routine

All the above posts are great! Jim's point on wheat is right on. Has anyone else noticed the amount of people that are gluten/wheat intolerant? It seems to be growing by the day, and it won't surprise me if the majority of us will be intolerant in the near future.

Adam, when I hit 40 I noticed my body was beginning to fall apart. I was having horrible back issues and could barely pick up my daughter (a year old at that time). I'm 5'9 and weighed about 175 back then. I'm no expert on this stuff but since I think we're roughly close in age here's what worked for me and some of what I've taken away from my routine:

– 30 minutes a day of exercise. I trade off daily on cardio and core strengthening. I take one day off a week, but I don't beat myself up if I miss a day. 

– cross train. My cardio days are running/walking, biking, or swimming (summer months), but I sometimes use an elliptical machine. Interval training works well if you're not into running (listen to music while you do it, it helps).

– core exercises = pushups, yoga positions, light weight training. I often play the current PP podcast when I'm doing this. Because of my tenuous lower back I stay away from situps. I do planks instead.

– Things to motivate me – I often look for a sprint triathlon (the short distance tri) that is happening in our area and train for it. I rarely ever go to them because they are expensive, but just having the goal gives me something to work toward. Also, find friends you can go biking with or you can ask at the local bike shop, they often have groups that organize a couple times a week. They are a lot of fun and most people our age are in it for the fun.

– if you decide to buy a new bike (mt or street), buy one that is a little better than what you think you need. That way if you really like it you, as you improve physically you will have some room to grow into the bike. If you don't like it, it's easier to sell a better bike.

– I don't know if you have back issues, but I've learned to pay attention to it. If it's sore, I change the type of exercise I'm doing. I also don't pay attention to my speed in any of this. My goal is to feel better.

– Don't skimp on shoes/sneakers. I found this has been the BIGGEST help to my back, hips, and legs. Good arch support is crucial (I've learned my feet are pretty flat…like my headsmiley). You can also find added arch supports at a good athletic store.

 – Breakfast is essential for me – cereal, fruit, OJ, a cup or two of coffee. If I don't, I can actually feel my metabolism drop, of course, that could be all in my flat head. I eat only a salad for lunch (a big one, but veggies only). This allows me to have whatever I want for dinner (but no fast food). I'll have a glass of wine with dinner, and often a small desert.

– Find a time that works for you. Don't know why, but I can't stand exercise in the morning, so I do mine in the late afternoon.

I dropped to 148 lbs in 6 months and have stayed between 147 – 153 for the past seven years. My back still gives me some trouble from time to time, but I know I would be in a lot worse shape if I didn't stick to my routine.

The only bummer? Be prepared to look a little older when you drop the pounds. Your round face will look a little more wrinkly once the fat that pushes them out is goneblush.

Best of Luck!!

 

 

  • Tue, Oct 08, 2013 - 10:30pm

    #13
    liz cowen

    liz cowen

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 14 2009

    Posts: 132

    count placeholder

    i started last week. i walk 3

i started last week. i walk 3 miles 5x week anyway. so have to cut back on the food intake.

cutting out carbs helps but you have to maintain that or the weight comes right back on.

simple math, since so many of you out there like math….

burn more calories than you take in. that's the receipe

i knew a thin woman who once told me her secret….she said most fat people ask what can i have on this diet how much can i have. she said she always thought how little do i need today.

hats off to all

anyone over 40 should have a physical before starting an exercise regime

i have a phys ed degree…we learned that 3x week exercise maintains to lose weight or get in shape you need 4-5x week.

also if you want cardio benefits, the first 20 minuted do nothing…it's what happens afterward so even tho i can't run any more, it takes me 1hr to 1hr 20  minutes for my walk

last tidbit…just do it and don't think about it.

  • Tue, Oct 08, 2013 - 11:38pm

    #14

    kevinoman0221

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 24 2008

    Posts: 96

    count placeholder

    More specific goals

Adam – You say your goal is to get below 190 and stay there. I think, more specifically, what you want is to get below 190 while losing as little muscle mass as possible, or even gaining some, and stay there. The difference is subtle, but important. You can lose "weight" without increasing health – you may actually decrease your overall health if a large portion of that weight is muscle mass.

While low fat diets succeed in reducing "weight", they also maximize the portion of muscle that is lost. They are the worst in this regard. You might expect half the weight you lose on a low fat diet to be muscle loss.

On the other hand, it has been well demonstrated that a ketogenic (very low carb) diet is the best way to lose fat while maintaining muscle mass, and is completely safe, even in duration beyond 6 months. 

I encourage you to do some poking around on the subject. One good place to start is with the info in the side bars here: http://www.reddit.com/r/keto/ and here: http://www.reddit.com/r/ketogains/

Also, don't worry about breakfast. You are better off not eating it. Read this: http://articles.elitefts.com/nutrition/logic-does-not-apply-part-2-breakfast/ The idea of "ramping up" your metabolism with frequent meals and a hearty breakfast is completely bogus, and has been proven so.

And don't fall into the "chronic cardio" trap: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/the-evidence-continues-to-mount-against-chronic-cardio/ Go for quality over quantity. HIIT – high intensity interval training – during short sessions of 15-20 mins 2 or 3 times per week is probably ideal for you. Along with 1 or 2 brief weight lifting sessions. 

It is easy to overdo exercise, and when you do, your cortisol goes up, and guess what cortisol contributes to? Muscle loss. Much of the conventional wisdom of dieting ignores muscle loss, which is a shame, as maintaining muscle mass is actually extremely important for overall health and longevity. 

  • Tue, Oct 08, 2013 - 11:55pm

    #15
    KathyP

    KathyP

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 19 2008

    Posts: 44

    count placeholder

    Weight Watchers

I've been a Weight Watcher since my early 20's and I cannot praise the program enough.  In fact, for 11 years after retiring from my professional career, I was a Weight Watchers leader.  If you want very sensible, practical advice on eating the foods that will help you lose the extra pounds, just turn to Weight Watchers.  The program has gone through many iterations as the science of nutrition has advanced, and the current program is the best I've ever seen.  I'm sorry if this sounds like an advertisement, but I'm a strong advocate for the healthy approach to food, exercise and personal motivation the program advances. 

You don't have to go to meetings if that's not your thing.  There's an excellent online version of the program.  The program is also very inexpensive, making it a great bargain.  Best of all is that it helps you develop lifestyle changes that will keep the extra pounds off. 

I offer this as the best resource I know for supporting sensible weight loss. Best wishes to you in your efforts!

Kathy

  • Wed, Oct 09, 2013 - 01:05am

    #16
    dryam2000

    dryam2000

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 06 2009

    Posts: 241

    count placeholder

    My $0.02…..

The Paleo diet has worked extremely well for me.  I don't follow the diet in strict fashion, but just by sticking to it most of the time I've seen the pounds drop off without even really trying or ever feeling hungry. 

Paleo can be summed up very easily:  stick to fruits, nuts, vegetables, healthy meats, and avoid all processed food.  Above all else, do not eat anything that has high fructose corn syrup (it's pretty much in everything these days, start reading labels if you don't believe me) OR simple sugar.  Ok, it's not too much more complicated than that.  People love to argue about the all the minutia of why one diet is better than another.  There's simply no arguing about avoiding processed foods, sugar or the equivalent, and eating fruits, vegetables, and healthy meats.

If you like sweets, then feed your sweet tooth with fruits.  There are some vegetables to avoid such regular potatoes (instead eat sweet potatoes).  Corn, rice, wheat products, soy, milk products are also things to be avoided.  The thinking is to eat like humans ate during the first 99% of humankind, and thus, these foods are most natural for the body to process.  The substances above are full of macro nutrients, but are nearly void of micronutrients.  One tip on minimizing the work of consuming lots of fruits & vegetables, you can make great smoothies & soups using a vitamix mixer which is extremely easy to do with little preparation & very little clean up.

I'm a true believer after losing the easiest 15 pounds (from 215, and still going) without much effort.  I allow myself to eat as much as I want, and have about 2-3 cheat meals a week because I have a serious foodie streak in me.

About the sugar thing, I encourage everyone to watch the following video.  The physician giving the speech is one of the most respected obesity experts in the country.  I'm a general internist, and almost every word of this talk makes complete sense.  Well worth the 80 minutes…..

  • Wed, Oct 09, 2013 - 02:18am

    #17
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 882

    count placeholder

    eat less, move more

That's it.  That's the whole formula.  It just takes discipline.

Eat quality and eat diversely.  No processed or refined garbage. 

Move frequently and move occasionally with intensity and/or with full range and/or with full speed and always with proper form, technique, and control.

If you're on the computer, get up every 5-10 minutes and do something.  Here's just one sampling of things you can do for timed bouts ranging from 10 seconds (phosphocreatine system) to 30 seconds to 2 minutes (lactic acid system).  Mix it up.

Squats – parallel

Front lunges – full range

Side lunges – full range

Jump rope – single, double, or even triple jumps

Sprints (in your yard)

Rabbit hops in place

Speed kicking (front, side, back, round, hook, etc.)

Push-ups (any one of dozens of variations from Marine Corp variety to Navy Seal variety)

Pull-ups or chin-ups (same variety)

Dips (I have a parallel bar/chinning apparatus in my back yard)

Chain punching (Wing Chun kung fu)

Combo hand strikes – straight punch, double punch, jab, cross, hook, uppercut, overhand, backhand, ridgehand, etc.

Grip squeezes

And everything is an ab exercise – I fire abs hard with everything, always initiating from core

Here's a unique neurodevelopmental sequence ab exercise – find an open expanse of floor or lawn – roll over and over from stomach to side to back to side to stomach using no arms and no legs – very functional and very effective

But it also helps to switch from yang exercise and do yin activities like yoga, tai chi, swimming, qi gung, etc.  It balances out autonomic nervous system activity. 

I had the lowest percentage body fat in my PT class (4%) and still have low body fat but higher than that due to being more cold tolerant that way.  Aerobic exercise is overrated.  You can get a better overall effect with interval training using the above or similar activities.  But for fun, my main summertime aerobic exercise are sand walking and running and cold water swimming (1-2 miles) depending on water temperature.  Hiking in deep snow and speed shovelling in winter do the trick then.  Usually, I resort to a wet suit when water temps drop below 58 but this year I did a mile in 56 deg. water (but dang cold with nothing but a bathing suit).  I'm 60, 6'2'', 220 lbs. and still in better shape than anyone I know my age.  It's a mental game even more than a physical one.

I have my own ideas but for a single source of published ideas (and to me, there is no best single published source but I plan on writing one), I like Paul Chek.

http://www.amazon.com/How-Eat-Move-Be-Healthy/dp/1583870067

  • Wed, Oct 09, 2013 - 02:39am

    #18
    ao

    ao

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2009

    Posts: 882

    count placeholder

    useful information but …

[quote=dryam2000]

The Paleo diet has worked extremely well for me.  I don't follow the diet in strict fashion, but just by sticking to it most of the time I've seen the pounds drop off without even really trying or ever feeling hungry. 

Paleo can be summed up very easily:  stick to fruits, nuts, vegetables, healthy meats, and avoid all processed food.  Above all else, do not eat anything that has high fructose corn syrup (it's pretty much in everything these days, start reading labels if you don't believe me) OR simple sugar.  Ok, it's not too much more complicated than that.  People love to argue about the all the minutia of why one diet is better than another.  There's simply no arguing about avoiding processed foods, sugar or the equivalent, and eating fruits, vegetables, and healthy meats.

If you like sweets, then feed your sweet tooth with fruits.  There are some vegetables to avoid such regular potatoes (instead eat sweet potatoes).  Corn, rice, wheat products, soy, milk products are also things to be avoided.  The thinking is to eat like humans ate during the first 99% of humankind, and thus, these foods are most natural for the body to process.  The substances above are full of macro nutrients, but are nearly void of micronutrients.  One tip on minimizing the work of consuming lots of fruits & vegetables, you can make great smoothies & soups using a vitamix mixer which is extremely easy to do with little preparation & very little clean up.

I'm a true believer after losing the easiest 15 pounds (from 215, and still going) without much effort.  I allow myself to eat as much as I want, and have about 2-3 cheat meals a week because I have a serious foodie streak in me.

About the sugar thing, I encourage everyone to watch the following video.  The physician giving the speech is one of the most respected obesity experts in the country.  I'm a general internist, and almost every word of this talk makes complete sense.  Well worth the 80 minutes…..

[/quote]

What's sad is that this seems to be a fairly contemporary presentation to a professional audience and he's talking about the evils of sugar (and its relationship to dietary fat) like it's a new concept.  But folks from Carlton Fredericks to Gary Null and others were talking about these concepts many decades ago.  Unfortunately, because they weren't MDs, medical witch hunters such as Stephen Barrett and Victor Herbert branded them as quacks when instead, they were just ahead of their time.  It's a shame.  It reminds me of the famous Ben Franklin quote:

"you will observe with Concern how long a useful Truth may be known, and exist, before it is generally receiv'd and practis'd on"

  • Wed, Oct 09, 2013 - 03:34am

    #19

    Jim H

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 08 2009

    Posts: 1798

    count placeholder

    AO..

I think you are oversimplifying by just saying, "eat less".  For one thing, actually doing that is much, much easier for many people once they get the wheat gluten out of their diet… it was for me.  Not everybody is G. Gordon Liddy. 

We are not grass eaters, and we are not adapted for eating the seeds of grass (wheat).  Read the book.. don't blow it off.  This idea fits in very well with Paleo, which is another way of minding the glycemic aspects of diet, avoiding the blood sugar/insulin cycles that come from too many carbs.  I think you can't go wrong with Paleo and no wheat.  I actually ordered some Paleo "bread" today;

http://www.julianbakery.com/bread-product/paleo-bread-coconut/?gclid=CJv_-tboiLoCFYai4Aodh2IAyw

There is another book that talks more about the effects of grains and sugars on cognitive ability; 

http://www.amazon.com/Grain-Brain-Surprising-Sugar–Your-Killers/dp/031623480X/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1381289213&sr=8-1&keywords=grain+brain     

I really do believe that the single most beneficial dietary change most people can make is the total elimination of wheat.            

  • Wed, Oct 09, 2013 - 04:04am

    #20
    dryam2000

    dryam2000

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 06 2009

    Posts: 241

    count placeholder

    AO

AO,

One doesn't have to be a rocket scientist to know sugar is a bad thing and it leading to numerous health problems, but the extent of the role played by sugar and high fructose corn syrup is only being born out fairly recently.  Having a concept is one thing, but proving those concepts by very well controlled broad studies is another.  Medicine is replete with people who have some great concepts but well controlled studies later completely refute the great concepts.  Estrogen replacement is on classic example when it made sense that this would dramatically reduce heart disease in women.  Most main stream medicine jumped on the bandwagon and gave hundreds of thousands of women estrogen only to find out later that this caused a dramatic rise in breast cancer and an overall increase in mortality.  Oops!  Anyway, good medicine is all about concepts that are well supported by lots of well controlled studies and hard data.  It really doesn't matter what credentials people have.  If they have the data, they have the data.  Once again, medicine is replete with MD's being laughed out by their peers when they have come up with novel concepts and novel data.  It's the nature of the beast when it comes to medicine or science.  The physician who discovered that stomach ulcers were mainly caused by a bacterial infection was laughed out of the building.  But guess what?, he went out and got the data. Those people you listed could have easily been laughed at if they were M.D./PhD's.  Additionally, those people you listed may have said that sugar was bad, but they did not put all of the pieces of the puzzle together on the why & how it's bad.  Knowledge is power, and I believe people are more apt to heed the message on how bad sugar is if they are able to see how all the pieces of the sugar puzzle fit together.

Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 79 total)

Login or Register to post comments