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ready to buy a hybrid vehicle :)

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  • Thu, Dec 29, 2011 - 04:37pm

    #32
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Edmunds online “true cost” calculator

I just used Google to find this link to determine car costs. It has some built-in and hidden assumptions that may not apply to your situation, but it is a good starting point for seeing the types of major categories that these people think are significant costs. Their list only goes back to 2006, so you won’t be able to compare beyond that. – Grover

http://www.edmunds.com/tco.html

  • Thu, Dec 29, 2011 - 04:47pm

    #30
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    Most likely not Mad Max….

[quote=pinecarr]

the realization that if things get REALLY bad in terms Peak Oil fuel shortages, or collapsing economy, then having a car that gets an extra 10 mpg (+ more debt) is not necessarily the right solution.

[/quote]

If things get that bad for a long period of time, then the car will probably be the least of your worries.  Mike’s view seems to assume that things will degrade rapidly to a point of no-gas, no-roads, no…, the Mad Max scenario. If you believe that is the case, then you should strive to be completely independent as possible since you won’t be able to count on anything….

However, I take the view that roads will still exist for quite some time.  Yes, they may get filled with pot holes and begin to look much more like roads in Mexico, but will still be drivable for at least 10+ years.  We may have a currency collapse, oil shortages, etc.   But I believe we will still be able to buy gas/fuel with potentially major inconveniences of brief unavilability, long lines, rationing, and potentially very high prices.

In all my preparations I take the view that I have no idea how things will unfold.  Being nimble and ready to change as things unfold is much more important than trying to guess and stake my plans on a predicted outcome.  That means being in a position to analyze and take thoughtful action rather than being forced to make quick/potentially bad decisions.  That means have basic necessities to survive for a few months in case of turmoil.

As far as a vehicle goes, what do you need it for?  If we do have a major collapse and Mad Max scenario, will you really care or still be doing the same things?   If you need a vehicle primarily to get to work, will your work still exist in a collapse situtation? If you haven’t answered the questions about how you will stay warm, fed, and safe already, I would concentrate on them before worrying about transportation.

For us, nimble for transportation is SUV, bicycles, Nissan Leaf and PV (note it takes a lot of PV to be resiliant in this fashion –  3 miles/kWh).  Now I just need to get a "My other car is a Hummer" bumper sticker for the Leaf.   I also enjoy the fact I can now refer to a Prius as a gas hog.

 

 

  • Fri, Dec 30, 2011 - 05:56pm

    #33
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    What year used Honda Civic for easier maintenance?

Thanks all for the good advice.

[quote=RDenner]  think that those thinking that buying a Prius or some other tiny COMPLICATED vehicles are going to be able to use them effectively on the downslope are being somewhat deluded… You are paying in some cases 15 to 25 thousand dollars on a vehicle that no one knows the long term toughness of. As has been pointed out above, if a small vehicle with good gas milage is what you need, then a 1995 Honda Civic is your best bet.

They are cheap and for all intensive purposes, disposable. You can pick one up for about 2 to 3k and get 29 to 37 MPG depending on how you drive. Those high tech battery operated cars are a technical wonders, but they aren’t going to fare to well in a future of delapidated roads and infrastructure…

[/quote]

I need a car to commute to work (only ~15 min), and occassional trips into town to shop, etc.  I think RDenner may have hit on what makes the most sense for my situation now; a used Honda Civic.  It may get me get me the best balance between "minimizing the debt I take on", "increasing gas efficiency", reliability and safety. 

Another consideration is getting a vehicle that will be maintainable if supply chains start to have problems and such.  RDenner mentioned getting a 1995 Civic, I think because this model may be easier to maintain.  That is another feature I think is desirable in the event the infrastructure deteriorates and more complex vehicles are harder to maintain.  But not being a car person, does anyone here know if I’d really have to go back as far as to a 1995 Civic to get one that is less complicated mechanically speaking, and easier to maintain if that becomes a bigger issue in the next couple years?

 

  • Fri, Dec 30, 2011 - 07:36pm

    #34
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    I’m not sure about Hondas,

I’m not sure about Hondas, but the last car I ever did any work on was a 1994 Saab. (Replaced radiator hoses, and it was a real struggle requiring flexible screwdrivers.)

I now have a 2006 Citroen, and would not attempt any repairs apart from changing a wheel. (There are yellow stickers on the engine warning me not to tamper with it.)

  • Fri, Dec 30, 2011 - 07:47pm

    #35
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Older cars

Personally I like cars from the seventies and early eighties. Much further back than 1995… As for European models, a same sized seventies car compared to a recent one, fuel consumption is about the same. But the older car is much lighter and is less complex.  Have a look at the old Volvo’s: parts drop off and accessories stop working, but they keep running…

No modern, complicated car for me. It has to be maintained by common tools. Even for less mechanically inclined people, a simple car is easier to maintain than a modern car.

Of course there is some difference between the USA and my country. Here, new cars are about twice the price compared to the USA. So for you it is easier to buy new and dump the old one.

Regards, DJ

  • Fri, Dec 30, 2011 - 10:00pm

    #36
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    I’m not sure about Hondas,

[quote=james_knight_chaucer]

I’m not sure about Hondas, but the last car I ever did any work on was a 1994 Saab. (Replaced radiator hoses, and it was a real struggle requiring flexible screwdrivers.)

I now have a 2006 Citroen, and would not attempt any repairs apart from changing a wheel. (There are yellow stickers on the engine warning me not to tamper with it.)

[/quote]

Another Citroen owner…..!  In the States?  Mine’s a 1997 model, and I pretty well do all the work on it.  I bought it from a friend who bought it really cheap, and had all the suspension spheres checked and/or regassed (this car has no springs or shock absorbers and is ideal for conditions when roads start to deteriorate from lack of maintenance!), and apart from tyres and wheel alignment, getting the aircon checked after I replaced the cooling fans with second hand ones, and an oil leak I fixed myself, it’s been pretty well trouble free.  This car cost almost $50K when new BTW!  It’s easily the nicest and most luxurious car we’ve ever ever owned

It’s definitely my last car…  Australia will be out of oil by 2020 (in fact it’s bound to be sooner than that) and I can’t see that we will still be driving around here in five years time…  and I’m utterly convinced it will be tyres that will become the definitive criteria as to whether we’ll be driving around as fuel gets rerouted to farming/military/emergency services.

Re Hondas, I swear by them too.  We’ve had two, one was an Integra (Accura in the US?) and we did 400,000km (~250,000 miles) virtually trouble free, never even changed the radiator hoses!

Mike

  • Wed, Jan 18, 2012 - 06:05am

    #37
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Finding a perfect commuter

Finding a perfect commuter car is a lot of work. The Honda Civic is a fantastic choice though. It has fuel efficiency and is affordable to buy. The automobile will not let you down on your regular trips to and from work. You are able to go to a dealership in Texas to find precisely what you would like in a Honda Civic. They will help you get what you need. To locate a car dealership near you with the Civic, go to:Texas Honda Civic Dealership

  • Tue, Sep 04, 2018 - 01:42am

    #38
    Mtlgooberdad

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    Hybrid experiences

I have to drive for work and do at least 35,000 km (22,000 miles) a year.  Our family has 5 people and we have 1 car, so I need a big car that has good fuel efficiency.  I owned a 2011 Hyundai Sonata HEV had no major issues with it.  It gave me the same fuel efficiency for the entire time that I owned it (Nov 2012-Mar 2018 177,000 kms) ; it was a great car. 

As I need a reliable vehicle, and with the interest rates rising and inflation set to spike I decided to replace my Sonata with a 2018 Honda Clarity Plug In hybrid.  It is a 5 seater, with better trunk space than my Sonata.  It has 80 km of electric range and can get 50 mpg when running on fuel on the highway.  So far, it uses very little gas (like a Volt) but provides long range capabilities with the 1.5 liter Atkinson engine.

I have the challange of a cold climate (Montreal) so it is nice not to have the range limits.  Electricity in Quebec is 100% renewables (Hydro and wind) so we’re less reliant on fossil fuels for power generation.

Diesel is interesting with the Bio-Fuel option, but from what I’ve read it really does depend where you live.  Bio-diesel can also present challenges in the cold if the oil gels.

How cheap your electricity is, what your budget is and probably many other factors that I’m not thinking of all contribute; so there are lot’s of “right” answers.

I wanted to write in to let you all know that the Clarity is an interesting way to drastically cut your fossil fuel consumption while not having to pay a great deal of money for an electric with a long range.  Bigger than a Volt with Honda reliability.

Will post again once I’ve put some more miles (kms) on it.

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