Investing in precious metals 101

ready to buy a hybrid vehicle :)

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  • Fri, Dec 23, 2011 - 02:16pm

    #21
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    Does anyone know why diesel

Does anyone know why diesel is more expensive than gasoline? I thought it was less refined so shouldn’t it be cheaper?

I believe part of the price increase is from switching to ulta low sulfer diesel as well as some states requiring a portion of all diesel to be bio-diesel (such as Minnesota which is currently at 5% and switching to a 10% requirement soon)

 

I have a 2010 vw golf tdi, I get around 47mpg on the highway once the car is warmed up.  Commuting through rush hour traffic for 30 miles each way I usually average 39-40mpg.  I looked at the prius but I enjoy how the golf handled and had plenty of passing power when required (nice flat torque curve and 240ish foot lbs of torque)

  • Sat, Dec 24, 2011 - 03:21am

    #22
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    The Best Peak Oil Proof Vehicle…

Almost half of Volt drivers are former BMW or Prius drivers.  Here’s a feature article I wrote recently explaining the Volt’s mile per dollar costs compared to the Prius.   It costs more upfront but you’ll peak oil proof your transportation.  

http://gm-volt.com/2011/11/04/2012-volt-drives-family-off-oil-and-saves-30000/

MrEnergyCzar

 

 

 

 

  • Sun, Dec 25, 2011 - 02:40pm

    #23
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    An Alternative View Point

I had an opporitunity to buy a new car in 2007(or newish). I had decided that this will likely be the last time I allow myself the luxury of Debt in me and my families life. I did all kinds of research on Hybrids(of which the Prius was just coming out I believe).

And after a lot of thought I decided to go in a complete and utterly different direction. I decided to buy a 2005 Jeep Wrangler.. Now before you laugh me off this post(of which this is my first), I came to this decision after looking at the whole picture.

I took on a debt load of about 300 bucks a month(and 15K in actual new debt). The 2005 Jeep Wranger is the last of the Straight 6 cyclinder engines that Jeep has made since the mid 1990’s.

I live in the Toledo Ohio area, which is the home of the Jeep Wrangler. There are literally 1000’s of these Straight 6 engines(and other parts) lying around in local junk yards. The engine is simplicity and there are almost no electronic gadgets hooked to this vehicle. No power windows, no defrost, though it does have A/C, but it can easily be disconnected.

As such it is a very easy to work on car, even for an engine illiterate like myself. Like I mentioned before I live in Toledo Ohio, which is about 50 miles south of Detroit Michigan. For those that live in this area, you will understand this next part. For those that don’t, you have to understand that we are on the cutting edge of the economic collpase. In 2007 I started to try an envision what a realistic view of 2011 or 2012 might look like and the obvious answer to me was infrastructure decay.

The local and state governments would stop maintaining vital parts of the transportation grid(as well as water and electric). This would result in much rougher road conditions as the collapse progressed. This has proven absolutely true in my neck of the woods. In parts of Southern Michigan they are allowing certain secondary roads to decay back to hard packed dirt roads. In toledo there are parts of the city that would EAT a prius or other small car.

I decided that the Jeep Wrangler(or similar simple rugged vehicle) would be the best bet in the uncertain future. Its gets crap for gas milage(around 20mpg), but it requires almost no maintanence outside of oil changes. After 100k miles, we are just now having to put some money into things like the transmission and some U-joint problems.

I think that those thinking that buying a Prius or some other tiny COMPLICATED vehicles are going to be able to use them effectively on the downslope are being somewhat deluded… You are paying in some cases 15 to 25 thousand dollars on a vehicle that no one knows the long term toughness of. As has been pointed out above, if a small vehicle with good gas milage is what you need, then a 1995 Honda Civic is your best bet.

They are cheap and for all intensive purposes, disposable. You can pick one up for about 2 to 3k and get 29 to 37 MPG depending on how you drive. Those high tech battery operated cars are a technical wonders, but they aren’t going to fare to well in a future of delapidated roads and infrastructure…

And obviously THE BEST strategy in the face of Peak Oil and rising oil prices is to get closer to everything you are doing. That was the first thing we did as a family, even before buying a newish vehicle. We got close to nearly everything we needed to do. I have a 20 min commute, wife has about 10 to 15. Kids are walking distance to school and we have an Aldi’s less than a baseball’s throw from our back door.

Robert

 

 

  • Sun, Dec 25, 2011 - 03:45pm

    #24
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    Welcome

RDenner

Welcome to the forums.  I like the way you analyzed this issue and your conclusions make a lot of sense.  Gas milage is just one aspect of the situation.

Travlin 

  • Mon, Dec 26, 2011 - 06:47am

    #25
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    Several of the services,

Several of the services, most notably those in the United Kingdom and the United States, sell reports to dealers and then encourage the dealers to display the reports on their Internet sites. Toyota Used Cars | Honda Used Cars | Nissan Used Cars

  • Mon, Dec 26, 2011 - 07:12am

    #26
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    future motoring

Been mulling over this thread over the break……  it appears to me that many of the posters are assuming motoring will continue to be a large part of their activities…. when in fact motoring will progressively get harder and harder.  I was amazed to hear about the roads around Detroit being allowed to go to pot.  I’m of the opinion that if things get THAT bad, it’s time to call it quits, and rather than spend substantial sums of money on a CAR, one would be better off spending substantial effort into prparing for not needing a car at all.

One of the things hardly anyone discusses in light of Peak Oil and fuel shortages is where will tyres come from?  Made 100% from oil, tyres, especially large 4WD ones, will become harder to buy, and certainly a lot more expensive.  Last time I bought two tyres for my Citroen I was STUNNED at how much they cost….. and just imagine what happens if roads get really bad and wheel alignments all go AWOL!  How long will your precious tyres last then?

Even Volts will need oil changes, whether or not you use the backup motor.  ALL cars will need batteries, and I suspect that as demand for electricty storage rises, the cost of batteries will skyrocket.  They already have.  I firmly believe we may well have already reached Peak Lead….. add an economic collapse, and there is no guarantee anyone will be able to get parts…

If TSHTF next week and we are not be able to drive one more mile, it would be inconvenient, but we are as ready as we can be, we have reshaped our lives so that we do not NEED cars….  we still drive because we can…

Mike

  • Thu, Dec 29, 2011 - 01:16pm

    #27
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    Can’t go wrong

 I recently got rid of my Acura and luxury suv and got 2 Prius (i).  Love them.   I avg 48 mpg and no premium fuel.  Forget the status mobile!

 

  • Thu, Dec 29, 2011 - 02:41pm

    #28
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    Mike wrote:Been mulling

[quote=Mike]

Been mulling over this thread over the break……  it appears to me that many of the posters are assuming motoring will continue to be a large part of their activities…. when in fact motoring will progressively get harder and harder.  I was amazed to hear about the roads around Detroit being allowed to go to pot.  I’m of the opinion that if things get THAT bad, it’s time to call it quits, and rather than spend substantial sums of money on a CAR, one would be better off spending substantial effort into prparing for not needing a car at all.

One of the things hardly anyone discusses in light of Peak Oil and fuel shortages is where will tyres come from?  Made 100% from oil, tyres, especially large 4WD ones, will become harder to buy, and certainly a lot more expensive.  Last time I bought two tyres for my Citroen I was STUNNED at how much they cost….. and just imagine what happens if roads get really bad and wheel alignments all go AWOL!  How long will your precious tyres last then?

Even Volts will need oil changes, whether or not you use the backup motor.  ALL cars will need batteries, and I suspect that as demand for electricty storage rises, the cost of batteries will skyrocket.  They already have.  I firmly believe we may well have already reached Peak Lead….. add an economic collapse, and there is no guarantee anyone will be able to get parts…

If TSHTF next week and we are not be able to drive one more mile, it would be inconvenient, but we are as ready as we can be, we have reshaped our lives so that we do not NEED cars….  we still drive because we can…

Mike [/quote]

Mike, you are hitting an issue that is the wrench in my decision-making right now, in terms of buying a new (used), more  energy efficient car.  I have a decent AWD vehicle that is good for our NE US winters, but it doesn’t get great gas mileage (~20 mpg).  So I have been seriously contemplating trading it in for a more efficient vehicle now, while interest rates are still low, and before gas prices go high again, which would make my existing vehicle harder to trade in.  But getting the better gas mileage is the "pro".  The "Cons" are: (1) taking on additional debt to get the more efficient vehicle (which is ok if I keep my job, not so ok if I lose it), and (2) the realization that if things get REALLY bad in terms Peak Oil fuel shortages, or collapsing economy, then having a car that gets an extra 10 mpg (+ more debt) is not necessarily the right solution.  So I am getting hung up, as it seems like I have to choose which "scenario" to place my bets on, and then make decisions accordingly.  Thoughts anyone?

 

  • Thu, Dec 29, 2011 - 03:35pm

    #29
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    hybrids

My wife and I need two vehicles for the present, so have chosen one that reliably gets 50 mpg (Prius) and another awd that still gets 25-28 mpg (Subaru Forester).  If I didn’t occasionally need an awd vehicle with some cargo space I would probably have 2 Priuses.

 

Doug

  • Thu, Dec 29, 2011 - 04:11pm

    #31
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    Hybrid Hype

In 2003, I bought a 2001 Toyota Prius with 15,000 miles on it. It was small, boxy, and handled clunkily. From February through October, I’d average 54 MPG and during the winter months (when 10% ethanol was added to the fuel,) I’d average 46 MPG. The only repair shops who could interpret the computer codes were Toyota dealerships. I don’t know if I had a lemon or if the repair record was typical of this first generation Prius, but lots of things needed fixing or adjustments. Since Toyota was the only company with the information, I couldn’t get a second opinion on anything internal. Over the years, we had to replace the catalytic converter, adjust the valves, replace one of the onboard computers, replace sensors, etc. etc. etc. Almost every time it had an oil change, something else needed attention. Hybrids are especially tough on tires. I’d get about 30,000 miles on a set of tires that would last 80,000 on a Corolla.

My advice is to generate a spreadsheet with expected costs – financing, fuel, maintenance, expected repairs, etc. and let that guide your decision. You can figure that certain costs will be fixed (financing) and others will be quite variable (the rest.) After you have your spreadsheet built, start playing with the numbers. Double the monthly cost of gasoline and see if it changes your decision. Depending on how much you drive, how often you trade vehicles, what your particular needs are, you’ll likely find that overall hybrid costs aren’t significantly different than comparable non-hybrids. At least, that is what I found.

Grover

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