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Quinine (Tonic Water) & Zinc

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  • Fri, Apr 10, 2020 - 05:46am

    #1
    Fionn MacCumhaill

    Fionn MacCumhaill

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    Quinine (Tonic Water) & Zinc

I’ve been taking COVIDー19 very seriously since late January (canceled business trips etc).

But there’s really something odd going on in the US right now.

Very good & actionable video from a US Doctor where he’s suggesting:

Schwepps tonic water (quinine) & high doses of zinc (100-250mg per day if infected, 50-100mg per day if preventative)

 

 

  • Fri, Apr 10, 2020 - 08:31am

    #2
    DaveDD

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    Quinine (Tonic Water) & Zinc —> why not artemisinin?

Hi All,

Check out Artemisinin.
http://markets.financialcontent.com/stocks/news/read?GUID=39773774

take care

  • Fri, Apr 10, 2020 - 08:41pm

    #3

    Jim H

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    Is quinine a Zinc ionophore? research does not readily validate this

The closest I have been able to get to showing that quinine can act as a Zinc ionphore is this paper;

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/237327549_Comparative_in_vitro_assessment_of_the_antiplasmodial_activity_of_quinine_-_zinc_complex_and_quinine_sulphate

Quinine-Zinc complex (QZ) was synthesized using a modification of Singla and Wadhwa method

So does quinine act as a Zinc ionophore naturally, in your body, without being otherwise pre-synthesized as a complex?  I have no idea.. there does not appear to be literature to suggest so that I can find.

 

  • Fri, Apr 10, 2020 - 08:50pm

    #4

    Jim H

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    I remain more sold on quercetin

We know that quercetin is a Zinc ionophore.. that is proven.  It is also of a class of small molecules that have been shown to impede entry of other SAR’s viruses (SARS-CoV) into cells;

https://jvi.asm.org/content/78/20/11334

Small Molecules Blocking the Entry of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus into Host Cells

These two compounds and the luteolin-related, FDA-approved quecertin, have potential for use in the clinical treatment of SARS.

  • Fri, Apr 10, 2020 - 10:40pm

    #5
    Linda T

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    Re: why not artemisinin?

DaveDD,

I agree with you, why not check out sweet wormwood and other immune building, anti-viral, anti-malarial plants from nature? They’ve been around a lot longer than prescription drugs and will be around longer than prescription drugs will be as we continue down the slippery slope of “The Long Descent”. In fact, before I read John Michael Greer’s book, I had thought collapse would happen fast all at once. Nope. Nada. He made a real good case that we will have a process of successional drops, then plateaus, more drops, more plateaus… Just as the forest is the climax species, an area of disturbed soil starts out with the pioneer species, and slowly there is the process of Ecological Succession. So, we’ll have Ecological succession in reverse….

From the wiki: “Ecological succession is the process of change in the species structure of an ecological community over time. The time scale can be decades (for example, after a wildfire), or even millions of years after a mass extinction.[1] “

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ecological_succession

 

Back to wormwood…

I’ve included some tidbits from a few websites. Funny thing is, earlier today I was shopping for some more veggie starts and saw a plant labeled “Artemisia annua”. It caught my eye, but I couldn’t remember why and what it was for. Unfortunately my phone has been acting up the last few days so I couldn’t search for information until I got home. I got home, read some comments, and thought “oh, that was it…”. Hopefully it’s still there tomorrow so I can see if they’ll put it aside for me.

First website:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antimalarial_medication#Artemisinin_and_derivatives

From the first section titled “Medications”, and subsection 1.10:

“Artemisinin and derivatives: Artemisinin is a Chinese herb (qinghaosu) that has been used in the treatment of fevers for over 1,000 years,[9] thus predating the use of Quinine in the western world. It is derived from the plant Artemisia annua, with the first documentation as a successful therapeutic agent in the treatment of malaria is in 340 AD by Ge Hong in his book Zhou Hou Bei Ji Fang (A Handbook of Prescriptions for Emergencies).[10] Ge Hong extracted the artemesinin using a simple macerate, and this method is still in use today.”

First bullet point:

“·  Artemisinin has a very rapid action and the vast majority of acute patients treated show significant improvement within 1–3 days of receiving treatment.[citation needed] It has demonstrated the fastest clearance of all anti-malarials currently[when?] used and acts primarily on the trophozite phase, thus preventing progression of the disease.[citation needed] Semi-synthetic artemisinin derivatives (e.g. artesunate, artemether) are easier to use than the parent compound and are converted rapidly once in the body to the active compound dihydroartemesinin.[citation needed] On the first day of treatment 20 mg/kg is often given, and the dose then reduced to 10 mg/kg per day for the six following days.[citation needed] Few side effects are associated with artemesinin use.[citation needed] However, headaches, nausea, vomiting, abnormal bleeding, dark urine, itching and some drug fever have been reported by a small number of patients.[citation needed] Some cardiac changes were reported during a clinical trial, notably non specific ST changes and a first degree atrioventricular block (these disappeared when the patients recovered from the malarial fever).[citation needed]  “

Second site:

Artemisia Annua (Sweet Wormwood) Benefits, Uses and Side Effects


“…Containing anti-malarial agents, Artemisia  Annua is a complete cure for this parasite-caused health condition with marginal side effects…”

“Artemisia for malaria prevention
Medical professionals across the globe acknowledge Artemisinin-based combination therapy as a highly effective treatment for Malaria. The existing drugs for Malaria are less effective as the user develops resistance to them with time. Artemisinin, on the other hand, entails fast-acting compounds Artemisinin help your body battle against Malaria for an extended period of time. Malaria treatment is now based on Artemisinin because of its high efficacy, quick action and the least possibility of your body developing resistance towards it. How Does Artemisia Work?

The functioning of Artemisinin is recently discovered and researchers are gaining steady success in determining how artemisinin drug kills the malarial parasites. The evidence states that Artemisinin binds to proteins in the key biochemical pathways.

It requires heme to get activated. Heme is an iron-containing component of the red blood protein hemoglobin. Heme is acquired from different sources during the parasite lifecycle. In the earlier stages, Artemisinin extracts heme from the biosynthetic pathway of the parasite itself. However, in later stages, Artemisinin can acquire it from the digested hemoglobin. It gets activated when it reaches a heme-rich parasite. It immediately attacks the parasite and kills it by jamming up several cellular processes and pathways.

There is still a lot unknown about the action mechanism of Artemisinin.”

Third site:

8 Top Herbal Remedies For Malaria

“8 Top Herbal Remedies For Malaria”
Third remedy down:

“Sweet Wormwood
Artemisia Annua is the botanical name conferred upon this herb. It is also known as a very potent herbal remedy for malaria. Sweet Wormwood leaves have been used as a herbal cure for malaria in China since ancient times. A chemical compound in this herb known as artemisinin is capable of fending off malarial parasite induced infection, according to researchers. Flavanoids in the dried leaves of this herb give this compound the potency to combat the malarial parasite inhabiting the human body. You can crush the dried leaves of this herb into a fine powder and consume this daily for warding off malaria.”

And the last one:

https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-756/sweet-annie

“Artemisia Annua (Sweet Wormwood) Benefits, Uses and Side Effects”
Linda

  • Sat, Apr 11, 2020 - 08:49am

    #6
    EmJayGee

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    Quinine (Tonic Water) & Zinc

My wife and I don’t drink much any more (a few times a year) but we’re having happy hour with tonic water and lime (or lemon if we’re feeling Anglophilic). Will it actually help? I don’t know but it’s helping keep some local stores in more business. I have some zinc on order.

  • Tue, Apr 14, 2020 - 07:53pm

    #7
    loj-ikul

    loj-ikul

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    Quinine (Tonic Water) & Zinc

Other Herbs used to treat Malaria are Boneset and Usnea. Boneset was used to treat patients during the Spanish Flu. It is a natural fever reducer. It also boosts the immune system.

Rediscovering Boneset for Influenza

The other is Usnea. It is a Lichen that grows on trees. It has been used to treat pneumonia. Its not for long term or high dose as it could harm the liver.

https://www.ijcmas.com/6-9-2017/Iwan%20Dini,%20et%20al.pdf

On Artemisinin there are two types normally sold. They are Artemisia absinthium and Artemisinin annua.  Artemisia annua or Sweet wormwood is the one used for Malaria treatment. The other Artemisia absinthium an is used for the nervous system as it acts as a stimulant. Its called Wormwood not sweet wormwood. It could cause seizures in high doses.

  • Sun, Apr 19, 2020 - 07:34am

    #8
    Bazix71

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    Quinine (Tonic Water) & Zinc

Shop bought tonic water has only small amount of quinine in it. It is also depleted by the amount of sugar or sugar substitute. The British inventor of Indian tonic water in the 1800s used a larger amount of Quinine in it than todays weak shop stored concoction.

  • Fri, Apr 24, 2020 - 05:32am

    #9
    monologue

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    Quinine (Tonic Water) & Zinc

Check out Quercetin – a very common supplement that has many other uses.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25050823

“Zinc ionophore activity of quercetin and epigallocatechin-gallate”

Wash it down with a cup of green tea (epigallocatechin-gallate EGCG) and your zinc pills.

 

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