Practical Changes

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  • Wed, Sep 16, 2009 - 03:35am

    #41
    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Re: Practical Changes

Thanks for the post BSV, that is great information that you provided. As I have a chipper and lots of Pecan trees I might have to look into wood gas generation. Unfortunately, I can’t weld and don’t have a friend that can weld. Does that preclude this as an option for me or just make it much more expensive?

Going to look up All Power Labs now….Jeff

  • Wed, Sep 16, 2009 - 04:01am

    #42
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    Re: Practical Changes

Jeff, lack of welding skills is not a deal killer. If you go with a non-profit vendor like All Power Labs, you can purchase a kit that requires some assembly but no welding. The cost is roughly $1,000 more, which is reasonable, it seems to me. For example, just purchasing a mig welder would eat up two thirds of the $1,000, and that does not count the time spent in learning how to use it. Since I have a ranch, I need and have welding equipment. I can do mig and arc welding, but I’m not an expert, which is why I relied on a friend to weld up the kit. It takes pretty good welding experience to put together a gasifier kit so in your case I would suggest you consider purchasing the Level IV kit, which requires zero welding and comes pre-painted. Good luck.

Barry

  • Wed, Dec 01, 2010 - 12:55pm

    #43
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    Re: Off-Grid Refrigeration

Hello Captain,

The SunDanzer in question is the Model DDR165 which is referred to as “direct drive”.  The unit uses gel refrigeration blankets which take up part of the useful space but it works to keep things cool overnight in most climates.

I am a top Sundanzer dealer, can help if you need help.

Cheers,

  • Wed, Dec 01, 2010 - 02:11pm

    #44
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    Re: Practical Changes

Thanks for the info Barry and Ron, its much appreciated……Jeff

  • Wed, Dec 01, 2010 - 02:41pm

    #45
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    Shallow Wells?

The elevation of my land is about 10 feet above sea-level. When I had the pilings dug for my house, I noticed the holes filled with water near the bottom at about 12 feet. I’m wondering how difficult it would be to dig a shallow well on my property to feed an open-flow aquaponics system. I was planning on using harvested rainwater, but it would be soft-water and I would have to find a way to filter effectively.

Does anybody out there in Martenson-land have any experience with shallow wells?

It may all be for nothing however, because at the time of digging the pilings, I noticed oil on the surface of the water in three of the holes. I don’t think the fish would appreciate oil in the water. Maybe I can put up an oil well and move to Beverly Hills with Jed and familyLaughing.

Thanks in advanced for any input….Jeff

  • Wed, Dec 01, 2010 - 11:44pm

    #46
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    Re: Shallow Wells?

I put in a shallow well last spring. I live in the Missouri River bottom where there is an aqufier with water at the same level as the river. I bought a 21′ galvanized 1 1/4″ pipe and had it cut into 5 pieces – four of them 4′ long and the other 5′ long. I also purchased a 3′ sandpoint and enough “drive couplers” to connect the sections back together along with a “drive cap”. I borrowed a 2″ auger to start the well. I hit wet sand at about 12′, so wet that the sand just slid off of the auger.  I then started “driving” the well pipe in the resulting hole with a modified fence post driver (larger and heavier).  Just drive a section down as far as you can and then add other sections until you can detect water in the pipe. Drive it down at least another 3-5 feet to allow for any drawdown. Connect and prime a small hand pump and use it to clean any fine sand that may get thru the sandpoint screen. By the time I got a shallow well pump working and keeping prime, I was down about 25′.  Lots of info on the internet about how to do the shallow well. All the parts needed are also available online if you can’t find them locally.  Just be sure that when you connect the pipe sections, you have some really big pipe wrenches (and lots of pipe dope) so that you can get the two pieces of pipe to but together. Otherwise you will probably end up with air leaks at the joints and won’t be able to keep the pump primed. I made that mistake and had to insert a section of 1″ black PE plastic pipe inside the galvanized pipe. I had never done a well before so I asked around and “hired” a 85 year old man to come and set in a chair (drinking beer) and guide me thru the process.  He had installed hundreds of shallow well and the stories he told were worth the consulting fee.  If you have rocks in your soil, then the above probably won’t work.

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