Occupy Wall Street – a first hand assessment

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  • Mon, Oct 03, 2011 - 03:05am

    #11

    Quercus bicolor

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    Occupy Albany Organizational Meeting

Tonight I attended the organizational meeting of Occupy Albany (New York) with about 150 other people (on 4 days notice).  There were about a dozen folks  who have been at Occupy Wall Street for a few days to as long as 11 days.  It took place outside in a small park in Albany between two busy streets.  The facilitators did an excellent job of allowing many people from the group to express their ideas, make proposals and ultimately reach consensus on several of them.  There was a diversity of political viewpoints represented and a willingness among most to put politics aside in order to address issues that we for the most part agreed on.

It will be interesting to see how much traction this movement gains over the coming weeks.  I suspect that it could grow rapidly, but time will tell.  I have mixed feelings about where this is all going. It is empowering to see people working together efficiently to build consensus and make their best effort to restore some sense of economic and political equality. I am also nervous about what kind of response this could provoke from the powers that be if the movement grows very large.  I wonder just how quickly any semblance of respect for the law, due process, etc. could go out the window.  On the other hand, sitting around and letting the status quo play itself out doesn’t sound like a good idea either.  I also wonder how much consciousness of impending resource limitations there is in the group and how much insight people have about how to build a long term strategy in light of these limitations. 

  • Mon, Oct 03, 2011 - 03:33am

    #12
    xraymike79

    xraymike79

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    steveyoung wrote:… It

[quote=steveyoung]

It will be interesting to see how much traction this movement gains over the coming weeks.  I suspect that it could grow rapidly, but time will tell.  I have mixed feelings about where this is all going. It is empowering to see people working together efficiently to build consensus and make their best effort to restore some sense of economic and political equality. I am also nervous about what kind of response this could provoke from the powers that be if the movement grows very large.  I wonder just how quickly any semblance of respect for the law, due process, etc. could go out the window.  On the other hand, sitting around and letting the status quo play itself out doesn’t sound like a good idea either.  I also wonder how much consciousness of impending resource limitations there is in the group and how much insight people have about how to build a long term strategy in light of these limitations. 

[/quote]

I’m with you in spirit since I can’t be there in person. Growing resource constraints are all the more reason you should continue with what you are doing. Jeremy Grantham is one of the few financial investment advisors I listen to:

Suffice it to say that if we mean to avoid increased starvation and international instability, we will need global ingenuity and generosity on a scale hitherto unheard of.

We need a paradigm shift away from a growth and exploitation based economy to a more cooperative, community-based, and egalitarian model. That’s really the only way to avoid chaos and bloodshed in the decades ahead.

  • Mon, Oct 03, 2011 - 03:46am

    #13
    xraymike79

    xraymike79

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    Advice for the protestors

  • Mon, Oct 03, 2011 - 03:49am

    #14

    Quercus bicolor

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    Declaration of the Occupation of New York City

 There might be a few points that are exaggerated, but I find myself agreeing with most of their grievances:

 

http://nycga.cc/2011/09/30/declaration-of-the-occupation-of-new-york-city/

  • Mon, Oct 03, 2011 - 04:45am

    #15

    thc0655

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    Agenda for the protests

Here’s an agenda I can endorse and get behind for the protests and occupation:

http://market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=195248

How about you? 

  • Mon, Oct 03, 2011 - 11:26am

    #16

    frobn

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    xraymike79 wrote:We need a

[quote=xraymike79]

We need a paradigm shift away from a growth and exploitation based economy to a more cooperative, community-based, and egalitarian model. That’s really the only way to avoid chaos and bloodshed in the decades ahead.[/quote]

Right, we need a paradigm shift. I have stated it a slightly different than you, we need to put people and nature above goods, in other words in the egalitarian world you speak of our consumer society must be reduced to a minor role and replaced by gifting, coops and the commons taken back from the 1%. I don’t think we will be able to avoid chaos in the decades ahead, my hope is that it will be limited.

  • Mon, Oct 03, 2011 - 11:32am

    #17

    Quercus bicolor

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    Addition to agenda

[quote=thc0655]

Here’s an agenda I can endorse and get behind for the protests and occupation:

http://market-ticker.org/akcs-www?post=195248

How about you? 

[/quote]

I agree and I would add one more.  Some way to remove the influence of money from politics.  Perhaps public funding of campaigns with no or very limited private donations allowed.  Perhaps something else.  There would also need to be a way to limit money used in lobbying.  I don’t know how to make it work, but I believe it’s essential.

  • Mon, Oct 03, 2011 - 11:37am

    #18

    Quercus bicolor

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    xraymike79 wrote:steveyoung

[quote=xraymike79]

[quote=steveyoung]

It will be interesting to see how much traction this movement gains over the coming weeks.  I suspect that it could grow rapidly, but time will tell.  I have mixed feelings about where this is all going. It is empowering to see people working together efficiently to build consensus and make their best effort to restore some sense of economic and political equality. I am also nervous about what kind of response this could provoke from the powers that be if the movement grows very large.  I wonder just how quickly any semblance of respect for the law, due process, etc. could go out the window.  On the other hand, sitting around and letting the status quo play itself out doesn’t sound like a good idea either.  I also wonder how much consciousness of impending resource limitations there is in the group and how much insight people have about how to build a long term strategy in light of these limitations. 

[/quote]

I’m with you in spirit since I can’t be there in person. Growing resource constraints are all the more reason you should continue with what you are doing. Jeremy Grantham is one of the few financial investment advisors I listen to:

Suffice it to say that if we mean to avoid increased starvation and international instability, we will need global ingenuity and generosity on a scale hitherto unheard of.

We need a paradigm shift away from a growth and exploitation based economy to a more cooperative, community-based, and egalitarian model. That’s really the only way to avoid chaos and bloodshed in the decades ahead.

[/quote]

Thanks for your support.  I agree this is important work.  I’m also aware of the potential it has to precipitate a strong undemocratic response if it begins to have widespread support and I have some fear around that.  I agree the alternative – doing nothing – is worse because if the consolidation of power continues into the future as it likely will, it will be harder to effect positive change.

  • Mon, Oct 03, 2011 - 01:45pm

    #19
    jumblies

    jumblies

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    xraymike79 wrote:

[quote=xraymike79]

[/quote]

This chap not heard of torches? Or porch lights? Or even waiting till daylight to show his decking? *sigh* I gave up after 90 seconds of blurry shadows.

 

  • Mon, Oct 03, 2011 - 02:50pm

    #20

    darbikrash

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    And here is the requisite

And here is the requisite Fox News response, first responders to subvert the movement into the the enemy and portray the protesters as anti-American….we’ve seen this movie before.

 

Hannity Tells Occupy Wall Street Protester ‘You Don’t Believe In Freedom’ | Today on his radio show, conservative host Sean Hannity interviewed an Occupy Wall Street protester named Heather, who attempted to explain the demonstrations through the Fox News host’s repeated interruptions. Hannity barely let her speak, instead taking time to engage in ad hominem attacks, calling her names like “Marxist” and telling her “you don’t believe in liberty, you don’t believe in freedom.” When Heather responded, “I’m definitely a person who takes things upon myself,” Hannity protested, starting to say, “no you don’t,” before telling her she wants to destroy America. Listen to the exchange:

 

Link to audio

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