Nitrogen Fixing Plants – I Need A Solution

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  • Mon, Jun 22, 2020 - 05:38am

    #1
    PJL

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    Nitrogen Fixing Plants – I Need A Solution

We are definitely beginner gardeners at the early stages of our journey.

Based on our soil test results, we need to plant some nitrogen-fixing plant(s).

Do you know of any nitrogen fixing plants we can plant during the summer in the northeast United States?

Thanks,

PJL

  • Mon, Jun 22, 2020 - 06:55am

    #2
    robie robinson

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    Nitrogen Fixing Plants – I Need A Solution

Go to grocery store and buy a bag of black eyed peas. Cut existing vegetation down LOW. Broadcast peas on top of ground. Water in at night, every night for a few hours. On day three you will have a mass of pea plants which will add nitrogen, OM and provide shellables fresh peas, awesome table fare, and easily dried peas for storage.

  • Mon, Jun 22, 2020 - 07:33am

    #3
    sand_kitty

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    Nitrogen Fixing Plants – I Need A Solution

Thanks Robie,

You get the peas in a bag.  Appreciate that voice of experience stuff.

  • Mon, Jun 22, 2020 - 07:57am

    #4
    bbtruth

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    Nitrogen Fixing Plants – I Need A Solution

Peas are a good nitrogen fixer along with beans…pretty much any legume will do for that.  I would add that nitrogen fixing properties are much better used in a chop and drop kind of method.  Simply growing the plants will help, but to complete the circle the plants should be chopped green and tilled in or allowed to breakdown in no till set up.
Additionally, I wouldn’t plant peas at this time of year.  Peas are a cool weather crop.  Spring or start at end of summer for fall crop.  Peas don’t like high sun and heat.
Another idea would be to incorporate a green mulch like lawn clippings or a cover crop like comfrey.
There are bunch of different ways to get what you need done.  Simplest route….add some organic fertilizer such as worm castings or aged manure….both high in nitrogen.
Feel free to ask any questions if you like.  I’m constantly experimenting with lots of types of gardening and I find there is more than one way to skin a cat.

  • Mon, Jun 22, 2020 - 08:13am

    #5
    robie robinson

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    Nitrogen Fixing Plants – I Need A Solution

Wrong pea. Black eyed peas are in the cowpea family. They like it warm. You can grow TopPickPinkEyePurpleHullPeas on concrete in Fla. in August.

https://www.southernexposure.com/southern-pea-cowpea-field-pea-growing-guide/ They are grown successfully as far north as Allegheny county NY. (I have grown them there)

 

  • Mon, Jun 22, 2020 - 08:25am

    #6
    bbtruth

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    Nitrogen Fixing Plants – I Need A Solution

Good to know.  So essentially, it’s more like a bean?  It’s a pea for drying with a longer growing period to harvest.  I have some and won’t be planting just yet in MN.  Like I said, I do like to experiment.  Will see how a fall crop does and report back.

  • Mon, Jun 22, 2020 - 09:00am

    #7
    robie robinson

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    Nitrogen Fixing Plants – I Need A Solution

It grows well in poor soil, and imho, is the easiest plant to increase organic matter and nitrogen. You can harvest fresh peas for shelling in less than 60 days.

 

  • Mon, Jun 22, 2020 - 09:55am

    #8
    Daddy-O McDadstein

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    Nitrogen Fixing Plants – I Need A Solution

just be sure to leave the peas’ roots in the ground to break down.

My uncle told me a story about peas and the Great Depression. He said he visited family in N. Louisiana and a relative kept doffing his hat when they drove by a certain field. Uncle Larry eventually asked him why he did that. The reply was, “We grew peas in that field during the Depression. That’s how we ate”, or something similar.

Southern peas love it hot, and you can plant them as late as you need to. Just give them time to make before first frost.

  • Mon, Jun 22, 2020 - 10:03am

    #9
    Daddy-O McDadstein

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    But Deer Will Eat Your Peas!!!

Oh, but if you live within range of a deer’s olfactory senses you will see your crop eaten down to the ground in short order. They love peas more than life itself.

They will find your peas! Especially when they begin to bloom, but even without blooms deer will sometimes mow them down.

Best put up an electric fence.  But if you shoot one or two of them they’ll leave your pea patch alone for several years. And you might put some venison in the freezer. Best check your state’s laws on that, though.

 

 

  • Mon, Jun 22, 2020 - 12:29pm

    #10
    robie robinson

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    Nitrogen Fixing Plants – I Need A Solution

High tensile electric is what we use on several hundred acres.

It is a slight deterrent for deer. However, around the garden, the electric will have a strip of foil hanging with a smear of peanut butter. Deer smell and lick the peanut butter and leave it alone for a while. The exercise best repeated a few times a year.

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