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Need Advice About The Best Vacuum Sealer Machine

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Viewing 10 posts - 41 through 50 (of 51 total)
  • Sat, Apr 22, 2017 - 10:49pm

    #41
    mntnhousepermi

    mntnhousepermi

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    recomended food saver

[quote=Kyle_Jackson]

Hello, what kind of food sealers can you recommend? At my work we have a vacuum chamber (Minerva I think) but I really can't afford a vacuum-chamber at home, so I have to settle with a sealer. Hope you can help me, so that I can start sous vide'ing at home!
 
Thanks,
Kyle

[/quote]

I dont use one often, and just have a basic model. But, I have been told that the ones to get are the Gamesaver line, and that this one is recommended by someone I know as a lower priced, but still good one https://www.amazon.com/FoodSaver-GameSaver-Bronze-Vacuum-Sealer/dp/B01M1OWXXJ/ref=sr_1_2?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1492901041&sr=1-2&keywords=gamesaver+bronze

Bag recommendations are these :
8" rolls https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00UCJS2HM/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

11" rolls https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0052BOEXG/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

and these :
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0013DGM4G/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0063HVE18/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1
 

 
  • Sun, Apr 23, 2017 - 08:04am

    #42
    TechGuy

    TechGuy

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    Mtnhousepermi wrote:”My

Mtnhousepermi wrote:

"My house is all electric, but again, my stove is not the appliance that I would miss the most ( that would be my clothes washer). I have many ways to cook food, if I need to heat my house ( rain or snow outside) then I cook on top of my wood stove,"

I was thinking of just "Kitchen" appliciances, but. I agree the washer is probably the at the top of  "household" appliciances 🙂 

FWIW: I don't plan to install a wood stove in my house. Smoke, Ash, dirty/debris from the wood as well as the increased risk of fire. In a crisis, there may be no fire department, nor a insurance company to pay for damage, or  to replace your home. I prefer to use an outdoor boiler instead. 

Another concern is if there is a nuclear war, it wouldn't be a good idea to use a woodstove that needs a open chimeny/stove pipe, and any wood you bring inside will also be contaminated.. Nor would you be able to cook food outside in a contamined environment for a considerable period. In my opinion, the odds are in favor of World War over a collapse, triggered by an economiic or energy crisis. In the case of an energy crisis, its likely that the industrial world will fight over Oil (which already began when the US started invading Middle East countries)

The advantage of a propane stove (in my opinion) is that regulates the temperature better than alternatives, and works indoors at all weather conditions. 

 

  • Sun, Apr 23, 2017 - 05:22pm

    #43

    Michael_Rudmin

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    I think what you want for heating and cooling….

Would be a heating duct above the cieling, and a cooling duct below the floor.
For the heating duct, it takes air from the house, runs it out to a woodstove house, and heats it without allowing mixing. Then the hot duct air goes back to the house up high, and as it cools slightly, drops into the various rooms.

For the cooling duct, it takes air from the house, and runs out to a little mini-waterfall. From there it drops down, approaches the house from the underground, and as it warms goes back up to the various rooms.

But warmed cool air is still cooler than uncooled air; and cooled warm air is still warmer than hot air. In both cases, the heat exchange occurs outside the home.

  • Sun, Apr 23, 2017 - 05:33pm

    #44
    mntnhousepermi

    mntnhousepermi

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    woodstoves and fire — nuclear fallout cooking

These things are all personal decisions, obviously, and what you are preparing for and what local resources you have.

But, just to clear up any misconceptions, I live in an area where everyone heats with woodstoves. Because propane and electric is just too expensive. Even if the house is small and has good thermal retention, propane is just to much money per btu of heat output. People do not turn their furnaces on, unless they are incapacitated for some reason. The only efficient to use propane heater I have seen was an older one that sat inside, a block on the ground like a woodstove, and so no heat wasted in ducts. That neighbor would run that sometimes, or the woodstove insert, depending on if she wanted to be bothered.

SO, as far as house fires go, I help our emergency services people here, so no, wood stoves are not our main culprit. More fires are started from back up generators, electrical shorts, and we had a real amazing propane tank explosion down the block ( hose leak during a refill), latest one this winter started in a garage by the chest freezer, I am not sure if it was in the freezer itself or the wiring behind it. People run generators to power indoor pot grows, this is a huge fire hazard here. People do not think about overloading wiring, having legal wiring, etc… with these. I have not heard of a wood stove causing a house fire in this area, while it is possible that a damaged stove pipe could lead to one, I guess people check that their stove pipes are ok. I have heard of a couple close calls due to people being stupid and LEANING wet wood AGAINST the outside of the woodstove, or just close enough to touch or almost touch. This is a hot area, and combustables need to be a foot away.

Most people here do have propane and cook on it. I dont because my house didnt come with it, and I put in solar instead, nd after that, it would have been expensive to plumb hte property for propane, nd expensive to buy it.

Nuclear war/fallout scenario. If you are designing  house to live thru this, then that is a whole other set of criteria. Yes, during a fallout period of time, you do not want to be walking outside to get more wood. But, anything that combusts in the house needs intake air, so lots of things to keep in mind. Good luck. I figured if I was to try and live thru fallout here, I just wouldnt cook, or would cook on my butane backpack stove. I do not have any great ways to think I would be safe in such a scenario, and I am rather close to metro areas, so… just not a location where it would be easy to try and ride that out….

  • Sun, Apr 23, 2017 - 05:42pm

    #45
    mntnhousepermi

    mntnhousepermi

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    Michael_Rudmin wrote:Would be

[quote=Michael_Rudmin]Would be a heating duct above the cieling, and a cooling duct below the floor. For the heating duct, it takes air from the house, runs it out to a woodstove house, and heats it without allowing mixing. Then the hot duct air goes back to the house up high, and as it cools slightly, drops into the various rooms. For the cooling duct, it takes air from the house, and runs out to a little mini-waterfall. From there it drops down, approaches the house from the underground, and as it warms goes back up to the various rooms. But warmed cool air is still cooler than uncooled air; and cooled warm air is still warmer than hot air. In both cases, the heat exchange occurs outside the home.[/quote]

 

Except that would take alot more wood, there would be alot of heat loss. Heating and cooling ductwork have alot of losses.

The most efficient way to heat with propane is to have a freestanding propane furnace inside the house, in the area of the house you area heating, like in the kitchen ( my next door neighbor had this) or family room ( with a combustion vent) the most efficient way to heat with wood is to have a freestanding wood stove inside the house envelope. In either case, ductwork will cause inefficiencies and heat loss.

  • Sun, Apr 23, 2017 - 07:14pm

    #46
    TechGuy

    TechGuy

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    Michael_Rudmin”For the

Michael_Rudmin

"For the heating duct, it takes air from the house, runs it out to a woodstove house, and heats it without allowing mixing. Then the hot duct air goes back to the house up high, and as it cools slightly, drop"

You can use an outdoor wood boiler which tranports heat using a a pair of underground pipes that connects into your heating system and domestic hot water system. There are multiple commerically available products to do this.

mntnhousepermi Wrote:

"But, just to clear up any misconceptions, I live in an area where everyone heats with woodstoves. Because propane and electric is just too expensive. Even if the house is small and has good thermal retention, propane is just to much money per btu of heat output. "

I am recommending using an outdoor wood boiler instead of an indoor boiler. not to use Propane  for heating unless its an emergency. Propane is a good fuel source for cooking and a stove does not use a lot pf propane, unless your running a resturaunt.

mntnhousepermi Wrote:

"I have not heard of a wood stove causing a house fire in this area, while it is possible that a damaged stove pipe could lead to one, I guess people check that their stove pipes"

People not maintaing (cleaing there stove pipe can result in a stove pipe catching fire, People storing newpaper too close to the stove and catching fire when an amber lands on the paper. Hot ambers when the clean out the ash. Even if you are due diligent, perhaps you have other people living with you that won't be. All it takes is one careless incident.

My biggest issue with interior wood stoves is the smoke & ash. An Outdoor wood boiler just eliminates this problem.

"Nuclear war/fallout scenario. If you are designing house to live thru this, then that is a whole other set of criteria. Yes, during a fallout period of time, you do not want to be walking outside to get more wood. But, anything that combusts in the house needs intake air, so lots of things to keep in mind."

Yup, In my opinion the risk of Nuclear war are much higher than an energy or economic triggered collapse. I think even after the 2 to 3 week of high-intesity radiation period that it will be unsafe to burn wood inside of a home. The wood will be contaminated with some long lived isotopes (ie Cs-137). when you burn contaminated wood its going to aerosol and radioactive contamiinents or end up in the ash that you need to remove from the stove. An Outdoor wood stove solve that issue. since all of the combusible products remain outdoors. During the 2 to 3 week high intensity fallout period I would just ride out with no-heat and use a small sterno cook top to heat up canned or dehydrated food. Once the high energy faillout decays, I will use propane in the kitchen to cook meals, and use the outdoor wood boiler for heat & domestic hot water. While radiation levels will fall, its not going to be completely safe. You need to use a mask or respirator to breath outside. 

As far as air there will need to be source of freshair anyway to breath. Outside air can be filter through a series of air filters. That said the biggest issue is tha most homes leak a lot of air, and the leaks will be a source of contamination that gets inside. 

mntnhousepermi Wrote:

"More fires are started from back up generators, electrical shorts.. People run generators to power indoor pot grows, this is a huge fire hazard here. People do not think about overloading wiring, having legal wiring"

Yup and kitchen stove fires are also common. I think in grid down, Generators, candles and people making make-shift alternative energy hacks will be the leading sources of house fires. That said I am 99% sure there will be a nuclear war over an economical collapse. Central banks will just print Trillions as they already have done in the 2008 crisis. When global trade begins to collapse caused by currency weakness, nations will go to war to obtain resources. After all the Great Depression (partial economic collapse) turned into WW2.

We already see this has begun with the USA going to war in the Middle East. Its likely that the USA and NATO will continue to push Russia and China into a corner, which they will eventually fight back. China and Russia are not going to simply keel over and die.There is now a new Arms race and cold war.

  • Mon, May 08, 2017 - 02:55pm

    #47
    Teresa Felleraft

    Teresa Felleraft

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    I have used Foodsaver V4840

I have used Foodsaver V4840 for months now and I think its one of the top ones in the market.

I have used several vacuum sealers before and a problem have been that they crush fruits, but V4840 is automated and works well. I found useful reviews about vacuum sealers here http://vacuumsealerresearch.com/

Teresa

  • Thu, Jun 15, 2017 - 03:12pm

    #48
    cauthang cp

    cauthang cp

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    Vacuum packing food helps improving food quality and saving mone

A lot of food is vacuum packed ( máy hút chân không), mainly because it extends the shelf life. Henkelman offers a suitable vacuum packaging solution for every application.  



Fit for food products

Meat, poultry, fish, dairy products, cheese, soups or ready meals? Bulk or individual products? Henkelman always have the right vacuum packaging machine for your specific wishes and requirements. Choosing the right vacuum packer can be so easy…



 

Vacuum packing food helps improving food quality and saving money



Advantages of vacuum packing food

  • Extended shelf life of food products
  • No loss of product
  • Improvement of food quality
  • No contamination
  • Prevention of freezer burn
  • Optimal product and storage possibilities
  • Professional product presentation
  • Optimal packaging, compatible with food safety and HACCP standards

Vacuum technology

Vacuum extraction… how does it work? The vacuum pump extracts the air from the product, the bag and the chamber. This prevents the aerobian bacterias from vastly multiplying, putting a hold on the deterioration of the food product. This way you can store, prepare and serve your products for an extended period of time. Enjoy the benefits of vacuum packaging with Henkelman equipment.

 

Soure : henkelman.com

 

  • Sat, Nov 23, 2019 - 09:57pm

    #49
    Ariousig

    Ariousig

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    Reply To: Need Advice About The Best Vacuum Sealer Machine

If you are searching for the best vacuum sealer machines I can suggest you out of my personal experience. I am using a Foodsaver Vacuum Sealer and it works perfectly fine.

  • Tue, Nov 26, 2019 - 11:18pm

    #50
    CA_Meerkat

    CA_Meerkat

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    Food saver plus mylar

For long term storage you can vacuum seal mylar bags. Great results – just opened oats from 5 years ago w no issues.

 

Here’s how. Get costco FoodSaver (these die occasionally so costco guarentee is key here; I’m on number three now).

 

Next cut the FoodSaver bag. You will see there is one side of the FoodSaver bag that is textured and one smooth. You will want to cut a 1″×1″ square of the textured side. You can discard the smooth.

 

Fill mylar bag w whatever you want to store, add o2 absorbers. Then place textured square inside the mouth of the mylar bagabout 1/2″ from the top of the bag. Use the foodsaver to seal the bag. Note that this might take a few tries until you get a good vacuum and may need you to move the square around (should be in between where the food saver and bag meet.

 

Once sealed, IRON THE SEAL. Hot iron, no steam. This will seal the mylar. The FoodSaver seal will not hold very long but ironed seal can be very thick and will last forever.

 

Hope this helps

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