Need Advice About The Best Vacuum Sealer Machine

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  • Wed, Dec 14, 2016 - 05:53am

    #31
    TechGuy

    TechGuy

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    Freezer Burn

Steelix Wrote:

"Food can easily become freezer burned when you freeze it in a baggie, but when you vacuum seal it, it helps get all the air out of the surrounding plastic, which helps prevent it from getting freezer burned. "

Turning off the auto-defrost will greatly help eliminate freezer burn. With a Defroster, the Freezer temperature is raised above freezing so ice does not build up. This causes the surface of your food to thaw and refreeze multiple times which promotes freezer burn.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Freezer_burn

"Meats and vegetables stored in a manual-defrost freezer will last longer than those stored in automatic-defrost freezers. This is because the temperature of a manual defrost freezer remains closer to −18 °C (0 °F) while the temperature of automatic defrost freezers fluctuates, and because automatic-defrost freezers have drier air, thus the rate of sublimation increases."

 

  • Wed, Dec 14, 2016 - 05:58am

    #32
    TechGuy

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    Home Freeze Dryer

FYI: Here is a link to a freeze dry machine for home use:

Home

These machines will dehydrate foods (fruits, meats, sauces) so they can be stored long term with refrigeration (although the freeze dry food would need to be canned or vacuumed sealed)

 

  • Fri, Apr 14, 2017 - 06:26am

    #33
    Bella Jeri

    Bella Jeri

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    An Advice About The Best Vacuum Sealer

When it comes to food, we choose the supreme quality for the healthy diet consumption, then why not to preserve and store them wisely until the time of requirement. And obviously, it will crack open your heart if you need to thrash the sweet and desserty donuts or juicy chicken wings.

 

In KITCHENOPEDIA you will be encountered with the TOP BEST VACUUM SEALERS Reviews and guided with the information regarding the same. Their types, applications, specifications and troubleshoots, all with detailed facts.

 

If you are newbies then i would suggest you to buy FoodSaver V3240, it is a highly efficient device and cost effective as well. It has a two speed vacuum sealing feature and possesses special ‘CrushFree’ feature to keep the food fresh and safe.

 

Regards,

Bella

  • Sat, Apr 22, 2017 - 10:02am

    #34
    Kyle Jackson

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    recommend a food sealer

Hello, what kind of food sealers can you recommend? At my work we have a vacuum chamber (Minerva I think) but I really can't afford a vacuum-chamber at home, so I have to settle with a sealer. Hope you can help me, so that I can start sous vide'ing at home!
 
Thanks,
Kyle
  • Sat, Apr 22, 2017 - 12:36pm

    #37

    Michael_Rudmin

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    Dupe, sorry

Duplicate post

  • Sat, Apr 22, 2017 - 12:39pm

    #36

    Michael_Rudmin

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    I wonder if food sealers are all that.

Just thinking out loud, yeasts have both an aerobic mode, and an anaerobic mode. So the byproducts are different one to the other, but the food still decays. In some cases, the anaerobic byproducts may be more toxic.
So sealing food is probably good, to a certain extent only. If you can also eliminate so much water that things can’t grow… that might help more.

in addition, any food sealer you get isn’t going to be useful in a collapse; nor will it be useful without collapse when they tweak the design.

That is, unless you make your own, and find a way to not be dependant on supplies. Maybe you buy a con-ex, bury it, and use a small wind/solar plant to power an air conditioner that dumps water outside. Thus you have cooling and low moisture.

To step up the plan one more level, have it dry air in a “drying rack” area, and only secondarily dry the air everywhere else.

On a lower level, make yourself a box that you can connect to a vacuum cleaner, and two long-arm glove holes on either side. Put the food in a 1-gallon zip lock bag, and the bag in the box. Close it up, turn on the vacuum, and with your arms in the access gloves, seal the zip-lock bag.

Now turn off the vacuum cleaner, and there’s your sealed and low-air-content /low humidity moisture bag.

Zip – loc bags (not the mecanical zipper, but the plain style) have the advantage of really sealing, being food rated, being reusable for a few times, being cheap… and not likely to be redesigned into inutility. Oh, and they don’t depend on power.

  • Sat, Apr 22, 2017 - 12:40pm

    #35

    Michael_Rudmin

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    Duplicate post

N/T

  • Sat, Apr 22, 2017 - 05:35pm

    #38
    TechGuy

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    Re: Food sealer after collapse

Michael_Rudmin Wrote:

"in addition, any food sealer you get isn't going to be useful in a collapse; nor will it be useful without collapse when they tweak the design."

Vacuum sealers don't use a lot of power. The could be powered with a small solar system. Some models just need a DC input and likley could be powered using a battery system.

Michael_Rudmin Wrote:

"That is, unless you make your own, and find a way to not be dependant on supplies"

Depends on what you use. Larger vaccumm sealer bags can be resused if you carefully just trim off the sealed edge, The resused bags will store less, but can be reused. Same with metal cans if you carefully cut the top off on the size, and have a supply of lids. Glass canning jars can be reused, you just need to stock up on extra lids. 

"On a lower level, make yourself a box that you can connect to a vacuum cleaner,"

Thats not really a practical option because vaccuum cleaners don't have sufficient pull, and also use a lot of power to operate. An alternative if you worried about failure of the vaccuum pump is to by a spare, or by a small vaccuum pump from harbor freight (usually used for small refrig./AC repairs). 

FWIW: I would be more concerned with being able to use most kitchen appliances in long term grid down crisis. Most stoves are electric and use a lot of power. A stove is probably the most essential items needed in a Kitchen. I think the only pratical option is a propane stove, since you can store propane indefinately. a 300 Gallon tank of Propane will probably run a kitchen stove for more than a decade. Yes a modern propane stove still needs electricity to fully function (Range top on most Propane stove will operate without power, but the oven temp. regulation is usually electronic).  Either you need a small DC/AC inverter to power it, or hack oven to run on DC power. Most likely stoves have AC/DC converters that could be bypassed to run on DC power.

Michael_Rudmin Wrote:

"Zip – loc bags (not the mecanical zipper, but the plain style) have the advantage of really sealing, being food rated, being reusable for a few times, being cheap"

From my experience ziploc bags are inappropriate for vacuum sealing since the offen have small pin holes in the corners. The type of plastic used doesn't melt the same way and usually you end of with a mess of plastic stuck to the thermal sealing head or an improperly sealed bag. Another issue is that ziploc bags are oxygen and moisure permable. Over time air and moisture will get into the food inside the bag. 

FWIW: For any long term food storage (beyond 8 months) I recommend using foil shielded bags because the are imperible to both oxygen and moisture.

Michael_Rudmin Wrote:

"yeasts have both an aerobic mode, and an anaerobic mode. So the byproducts are different one to the other, but the food still decays. In some cases, the anaerobic byproducts may be more toxic."

There are a few methods to avoid problems with yeast and mold. Microbes need water to reproduce, and dry foods can be stored at low moisture levels to avoid microbes growth. Dry foods can be dried out on a tray in a oven, set to a low temperature.Set the oven temperture to 140F and let sit for a couple of hours or more (depending on moisture content). Most microbes can be killed off using heat. That's why there are pressure canners, so that the temperture of food being stored is raised to sterlize the contents. 

  • Sat, Apr 22, 2017 - 09:33pm

    #39
    mntnhousepermi

    mntnhousepermi

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    not needed– ghetto method

[quote=tictac1]

Or redneck method, whichever you prefer…

I use a normal household vacuum, with the crevice nozzle attachment and a hot iron (no steam).  If the material is loose and lightweight, a nylon stocking over the nozzle tip prevents it from sucking up any contents.  You fill the bag (I use mylar), then seal all but the last inch or so, then insert the crevice nozzle, turn on the vacuum, and seal the rest as the vacuum maintains suction.  I usually throw in a few oxygen scavengers.

This produces very tightly sealed bags, and can be done with mylar bags in plastic buckets.

My neighbor uses and recommends the FoodSaver he got from Costco.  He also uses the method I outlined.  Actually, he showed it to me.  He only uses the FoodSaver for meats.

[/quote]

I also think the crevice tool is dirty….But, I have done alot of long term storage, you do not need to suck the air out, just seal most of the top of the mylar bag, leaving enough space to insert one of the correct sized O2 absorbers, fold the top over just to press out excess space a bit, put in the O2 absorber and seal that spot. By the next day, the package of rice -or beans or popcorn or whatever, should be sucked in and hard as a rock.

  • Sat, Apr 22, 2017 - 09:54pm

    #40
    mntnhousepermi

    mntnhousepermi

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    canning jar adaptor, no power dehydrating and cooking

I have used the canning jar adaptor on the Food Saver quite a bit, works great on most things. I use this for things I am just using this calendar year, like home dried fruit, or dried beans.

As for the regular vacumed bags, I only use those for things I freeze that I am using that year. For long term storage, I use mylar bags with O2 absorbers.

For kitchen use in a possible low power future, I would just put the dried fruit in the canning jar and not suck out the air, this still keeps dried fruit pretty well over the winter. Same for freezer, I wouldnt be using the freezer, so no freezer bags needed, I would can or dehydrate or ferment the fruit and veggies. I hardly use the freezer, a small amount of frozen berries, some frozen persimmon pulp. But, dried persimmons are so, so good, so I would just do a bit more of that. I made pickled strawberries and rhubarb chutney this year to keep trying out ways to preserve foods.

I have a homemade Living Foods dehydrator, which could be suspended over my wood stove ( reason # — to have a wood stove inside the house) to dry foods. In the heat of fall, for apples and grapes, I just put the drying trays outside in the sun to dry fruit, but persimmons are too late for that !

I can also dehydrate in my sun oven, although when the sun is out here, the deck is hot enough. If I was drying jerky I might use the sun oven in the summer.

My house is all electric, but again, my stove is not the appliance that I would miss the most ( that would be my clothes washer). I have many ways to cook food, if I need to heat my house ( rain or snow outside) then I cook on top of my wood stove, I have alot of practice doing this, and my woodstove is a space heating model. If I do not need heat inside, then I usually use my sun ovens out on the deck. But, I also have a rocket stove, which I have practiced using. They are amazing, I can get a big pot of water boiling with just sticks I pick up off the ground. My portable rocket stove is like this one, but maybe not this brand, https://www.amazon.com/EcoZoom-Versa-Rocket-Stove/dp/B005GQZ4O0?SubscriptionId=AKIAILSHYYTFIVPWUY6Q&tag=duckduckgo-ffsb-20&linkCode=xm2&camp=2025&creative=165953&creativeASIN=B005GQZ4O0

The sun oven is this, I have been cooking with them for years, very convenient, set it up and dinner is ready when you get home, I have taken one camping, etc…. https://www.sunoven.com/

The most important thing is to practice your alternate cooking methods now.

Viewing 10 posts - 31 through 40 (of 51 total)

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