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More Than Honey – The Movie

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  • Sat, Jun 08, 2013 - 02:40am

    #1

    Jason Wiskerchen

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    Joined: Sep 17 2011

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    More Than Honey – The Movie

A new documentary coming out June 12th that looks to have some incredible visual appeal and open up discussion about the importance of bees to our food security and planetary health.  I hope it gets more people talking about the incredible predicament we face with the decline of bee populations and the effects we will have to deal with. 

I am looking forward to seeing this movie.  Anyone else interested in seeing this film?

  • Thu, Aug 01, 2013 - 03:58pm

    #2

    dps

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    Systemic Pesticides

I'm the chair of the Colorado State Beekeepers Association Pesticide Committee.  In that capacity, I have created a slide presentation called "What Honeybees Taught Me About Pesticides" … a couple of snips:

Neonicotinoid is one type of Systemic Poison.  There are many.  What gets "tested" is called the Active Ingredient (AI).  Nothing else in the mixture must be tested.  AI is tested in isolation, the effect of combined AIs, as is frequently found in bee hives, is almost completely unknown.  Registrants, the company asking EPA for registration, are responsible for their own testing.  EPA takes the results without question.  Results are not peer reviewed or published.  AI metabolizes over time breaking down into new chemical combinations that are environmentally dependent (temperature, humidity, etc.).  There is a concept called half-life.

Half of the Active Ingredient is still left in:
Clothianidin            148 – 1,155 days
Imidacloprid            40 – 997 days
Thiamethoxam        25 – 100 days*
Dinoteferan            50 – 100 days
varies by soil density, higher density produces longer half-life.
* Clothianidin is a primary metabolite of thiamethoxam, that is, thiamethoxam metabolizes into clothianidin.  Yet another layer of “gotcha”

There is much more … dons

  • Thu, Aug 01, 2013 - 07:33pm

    #3
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

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    Congrats are in order

Thank you for you service. My girls can't type so i'm thanking you for them.

robie

  • Mon, Aug 12, 2013 - 06:03pm

    #4
    Doug

    Doug

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    top bar hives

If there is someone on here familiar with top bar hives, I would be interested in talking (or TMing, or emailing, or whatever).

Doug

  • Mon, Aug 12, 2013 - 06:31pm

    #5

    Swampmama3

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    top bar hives

Hello, I was sad to read of your loss.  I am an 'accidental' top bar bee person.  I don't call myself a beekeeper because they keep themselves, pretty much.  They are feral and they adopted my new, empty top bar hive that I set out last spring. (2012).  Since then, the only thing we've done is move the false back forward so they'd have less space to heat in winter, then move it back again in the spring to give them more room to grow.  We've never fed or treated them with anything at all.  So far, so good.

I think keeping with Langstroth hives is 'messing with' the bees too much.  Bees in the wild don't need all that human interference.  The only reason to use langstroth hives is if you are looking to make a profit from honey.  If you just want to keep bees for the sake of the bees and for pollination, top bar is the way to go. 

  • Tue, Aug 13, 2013 - 02:16pm

    #6

    Swampmama3

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    Another thought

Keep in mind that the european honeybee, which is what we use in beekeeping generally, is not native to the U.S.  There is a wide range of pollinators here who get things done quite nicely with no honeybees at all.  In my squash, I see all kinds of mason bees, little flies, and wasp looking critters, but rarely an actual honeybee.

If we don't kill off the native bees, we'll still have pollination without the european honeybee.  But maybe not for the non-native crops that we grow now days. 

For example, bees can have a one-track mind.  Mine were going to a food source north of me in the woods this spring.  My fruit trees were blooming, and they ignored them and kept going to whatever they had found in the woods, because the source in the woods bloomed first.  They had in their little memories to keep going there until that source was exhausted.  My fruit did get pollinated by other insects, but then we had a late frost and lost all the flowers.  That was a dissappointment.

My garden still gets pollinated even though my bees mostly ignore it in preference of wild sources of forage.

  • Thu, Mar 13, 2014 - 06:43pm

    #7
    SPAM_buzzbindaas

    SPAM_buzzbindaas

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    Documentary

I have seen this documentary movie in one of the social media marketing agencies

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