Monoclonal Antibody Infusion Therapy – QUESTION

Login or register to post comments Last Post 0 reads   10 posts
  • Tue, Aug 31, 2021 - 11:18pm

    #1
    Stromboli

    Stromboli

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 21 2020

    Posts: 15

    count placeholder1

    Monoclonal Antibody Infusion Therapy – QUESTION

I’m still finding my way around these forums and hope I’ve landed in the right place for the question. If not, moderators are encouraged to set me straight – Thanks

Here’s what’s on my mind tonight-

My best friend began exhibiting Covid-19 symptoms a week ago after close, unmasked exposure with another friend at a local coffee shop. My friend is in his 70s, physically fit for his age, has a low BMI, non-vaccinated and experiencing only mild symptoms. However, in addition to his age, he has had a heart valve replaced and is at higher risk.

He plans to take Monoclonal Antibody Infusion Therapy (mAb) tomorrow at a regional hospital. I’d not heard of this therapy mentioned before today and he suggested I research it.

After a bit of reading I understand that this treatment protocol is also authorized by the FDA under a “Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) to several monoclonal antibody therapies as a treatment for COVID-19.”

The article above goes on to state that, “The FDA stressed that the therapy is not a substitute for vaccination, however.”

I’m new to this forum and apologize if this has been discussed. Does anyone have thoughts pro or con on the mAb therapy?

I’m personally following the MASK+ protocol but wondering if this might be an option for me should I begin to experience symptoms. The virus is very prevalent in my small community at this time. Although I’m doing what I can about prevention, I do fall into a higher risk category myself where age and comorbidities are concerned and this kind of information is always welcome.

Thank you

p.s. Is this behind the Paywall by any chance?

  • Wed, Sep 01, 2021 - 12:07am

    #2
    Bill in La Mesa

    Bill in La Mesa

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 16 2020

    Posts: 210

    count placeholder2

    Monoclonal Antibody Infusion Therapy – QUESTION

Monoclonal anti-B’s are great, provided you can get them early enough.

The protocol calls for therapy within 10 days of symptom onset, but most sources I’ve seen indicate viral replication is peaking within 5-7 days of symptom onset.

The monoclonals won’t hurt (there’s no spike protein, like from the vaccines) if given late, but the later the infusion, the less impressive the benefit.

If he’s got an artificial valve, he should already be on aggressive anti-clotting (coumadin/warfarin) which is great.  The pig/porcine valves also get anticoagulation meds, but typically less aggressive.

He needs to push hard for steroids if he starts having breathing problems.  This should be standard of care now, but there may still be some doc’s who haven’t heard the news.

  • Wed, Sep 01, 2021 - 12:11am

    #3
    readingrainbow

    readingrainbow

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jul 15 2021

    Posts: 54

    count placeholder1

    Monoclonal Antibody Infusion Therapy – QUESTION

Hey Stromboli, good to see you made a post about this. I’m just commenting to hopefully draw more attention to your post.

I know very little about this therapy, and unlike many here, I do not have a strong background in science. I’m sure you will have more responses tomorrow. But, for the sake of discussion, I will share my opinion about why this is being allowed while ivermectin is not.

I’m inclined to believe this could potentially be a successful therapy, that is allowed only because it is new and expensive, at $2,000 per infusion. From the little I’ve read about it, it seems sensible compared to the mrna vaccines. If this was a cheap therapy, you could be certain that the media would start a campaign against it.

Edit- you’re not behind a paywall!

  • Wed, Sep 01, 2021 - 12:31am   (Reply to #2)

    #4
    Stromboli

    Stromboli

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 21 2020

    Posts: 15

    count placeholder0

    Monoclonal Antibody Infusion Therapy – QUESTION

Bill thanks for the guidance on the steroids. IIRC he did receive the pig/porcine valve and I think is on warfarin but don’t know the dosage. I’ll pass your information along to him.

I appreciate your comment.

  • Wed, Sep 01, 2021 - 12:40am

    #5
    Stromboli

    Stromboli

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 21 2020

    Posts: 15

    count placeholder0

    Monoclonal Antibody Infusion Therapy – QUESTION

Edit- you’re not behind a paywall!

Good to know before I embarrass myself 😉 Thanks

  • Wed, Sep 01, 2021 - 02:35am

    #6
    davefairtex

    davefairtex

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 03 2008

    Posts: 2752

    count placeholder2

    mccullough recommends them

The data on the antibodies is quite strong.  Dr McCullough recommends that everyone over 65 get the antibody transfusion – but to do this prior to hospital admission – for some strange reason, once you’re admitted, you can’t get them.

https://c19regn.com/

And as Mike says, earlier is better.

Takes about an hour, via IV.

  • Wed, Sep 01, 2021 - 09:48am

    #7
    Clem

    Clem

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jun 04 2019

    Posts: 9

    count placeholder1

    Monoclonal antibody treatment – Free for Floridians?

Anyone 12 and older who has COVID-19 or been exposed to someone with the virus may receive the treatment without a health care provider’s referral or prescription, DeSantis said. The antibodies help the immune system recognize and respond to the virus.

The injections consist of two in the stomach and one in each arm, he said.

The people who will benefit the most from monoclonal antibody treatments, DeSantis said, are in these high-risk groups:

Elderly (50 and older)
Overweight (BMI of 25 or higher)
Compromised immune system
Diabetes
Problems with heart, lungs, kidneys.

“Of the people that were being admitted to hospitals, 90% of them never got the monoclonal antibody treatment prior to being admitted to the hospital,” DeSantis said, adding there’s been a lack of knowledge and understanding about the treatment.

https://www.tcpalm.com/story/news/local/2021/08/23/covid-florida-gov-ron-desantis-news-conference-fort-pierce-monoclonal-antibody-treatment-site/8243746002/

What is Regeneron?

Regeneron, which is being used at all Florida sites, is a common name for REGEN-COV, a monoclonal antibody treatment manufactured by Regeneron Pharmaceuticals.

“It’s the only monoclonal that’s had success against the delta variant,” DeSantis said, adding another benefit is the injections take only minutes instead of an IV that takes an hour. But there is a short window of opportunity.

“You’ve got to do this early, so if you are infected, by the time you get very, very ill and require hospitalization, it’s probably too late for this to work,” he said. “Clearly, the sooner you do it, the better you’re going to be.”

 

  • Wed, Sep 01, 2021 - 10:40pm

    #8
    Stromboli

    Stromboli

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 21 2020

    Posts: 15

    count placeholder0

    Monoclonal Antibody Infusion Therapy – QUESTION

I just spoke with my friend. Other than the ordeal at the hospital which took more than 5 1/2 hours he was able to receive the mAb therapy today. He reported no side effects whatsoever. Part of today’s delay was that he never received test results back from the original testing lab. Today he re-tested at the ER and was indeed positive.

He was given casirivimab and imdevimab by IV infusion and reports that he is already feeling better, citing especially that, he feels stronger than he did this morning driving to the hospital.

Of note is that my buddy self-referred and was a walk-in patient for treatment. We both questioned why this treatment isn’t more mainstream and why, since early detection is so important, his original labs have still not come back.

Thanks for the feedback on this question. I learned a lot!

 

  • Sat, Sep 04, 2021 - 06:49pm

    #9
    Will

    Will

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: May 14 2020

    Posts: 8

    count placeholder0

    Regulating the Distribution of Monoclonal Antibody Infusion

I’ve been encouraged by several friends having good outcomes with the monoclonal antibody infusions. Most have also used ivermectin, doxy or Z-pack and supplements. After the events this week we started calling it our Joe Rogan Experience!

Something to be aware of are reports of new efforts to regulate infusion distribution. As if the regulation of everything else weren’t enough! Torqued me off seeing that. The better news this week was one friend receiving high dose Ivm treatment from an ER in Palm Beach. We were shocked and then the reports of dramatic increase in Ivm scripts kept rolling in, a welcome counter to all the other amped up horseshit.

Here’s a link to the doctor’s alert today on twit-wit for more info…

Note the mention of nudging going on.

  • Sun, Sep 05, 2021 - 01:05am   (Reply to #9)

    #10
    Aria

    Aria

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Aug 03 2020

    Posts: 73

    count placeholder0

    Monoclonal Antibody Infusion Therapy – QUESTION

It sounds like Fedzilla wants to regulate it because it is competing with vaccine interests $$$$.

I just found out this treatment is available in my area. Does anyone know if monoclonal antibody therapy has any effect on one’s future immunity to covid? In other words, if you get covid and have this treatment, will you have immunity like you would have otherwise?

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)

Login or Register to post comments