Monoclonal Antibodies

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  • Wed, Sep 22, 2021 - 04:04pm

    #1
    Bill Rinaldo

    Bill Rinaldo

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    Monoclonal Antibodies

Hi Team – not sure if Chris did a video on this. I have not seen anything. Was looking for some more information on Regen-COV treatment for monoclonal antibodies. Today I tested positive for Covid. Minor systems. Not vaccinated, no negative health effects 38 and healthy. I take the recommend FLCCC supplements and have some IVM on hand.

With that said, I made an appointment for Regen treatment, but cancelled it. Specifically because the EUA warning says “It may interfere with your body’s ability to fight off a future infection of SARS-CoV-2.” I’d be curious to know if there is any discussion around the bodies innate immune system, and if using an antibody treatment would impact my ability to build robust long lasting immunity to covid. Since I have mild systems at the moment I’m going to punt on this treatment until I can find more research.

  • Wed, Sep 22, 2021 - 08:25pm

    #2
    C3saving

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    Monoclonal Antibodies

Here is my experience with monoclonal antibodies.  I tested positive after Thanksgiving in November 2020.  By the first week of December, I was 8 days in. ( I am 52 and have asthma.  I take an inhaled corticosteroid along with a couple of nasal sprays to keep asthma under control.  It worked for about a year and a half prior to covid.  )  By day 8, I found my body had gone into the inflammation phase, and it became difficult to breathe.  I was not eating and was not wanting to get out of bed.   Any talking would cause extreme coughing.    Once my blood oxygen level began falling below 90, I went to the ER.   I was told I was not sick enough to be admitted, but two doctors came in and said they could offer me an experimental IV treatment.   Without thinking, I said yes.  It was the monoclonal antibodies.  The name was quite long at least 4 syllables and ended in BAM.  So they coined it the BAM treatment.  The two doctors looked at each other and said Wow, that was easy.  She didn’t even ask any questions.  I rolled my head on the bed so I could see them and said okay, here is a question.  How many people have you administered this to.  They said I would be the third person.  I didn’t care.  I felt like I was either going to die either from covid or the experimental treatment. ( By the way, I asked multiple times about Ivermectin as EVMS had it on their protocol.  EVMS is 20 minutes from my location. )  Everyone refused.  They infused the antibodies and watched me for about an hour and then discharged me.  I didn’t want to move from that hospital bed, but I did.  I had no intention of returning.   My pulmonary doctor happened to be working in the ER that night and came to see me.  He said if I didn’t feel better to come back to ER.  I had already resigned myself to not returning.  The next day I was parked in the bed where I landed the night before and the nurse from my pulmonary doctor’s office called to check-in.  I didn’t feel any different and apparently sounded pretty bad.  The nurse called the doctor and I was told to go back to the hospital to be admitted.   My body was losing the battle and marching right into pneumonia.   Long story short – didn’t work for me.  Does it prevent your body from fighting off the virus later on?  I don’t know.  I believe I did read that on the paperwork I received.  I think it probably would have been more successful for me if I had received it earlier.   Since you have the IVM, I think you might be all right.  I have my cocktail of IVM, Zinc, and Z pack on the ready from FLCCC in the event that I get this thing again.  I have no intention of returning to the hospital.    I spent 6 days in the hospital receiving convalescent plasma, 5 days of remdesivir, antibiotics, steroids, blood thinners, medication to ease the body aches, and multiple other pills.    I have read that Remdesivir doesn’t have a good track record.  Many folks go into organ failure.  I guess God still needs me here because I survived.  I still do not have the stamina and brainpower I once had, but I’m here to keep doing what the good Lord has set out for me to do.   Wishing you a speedy recovery.

 

  • Wed, Sep 22, 2021 - 10:22pm

    #3
    davefairtex

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    early treatment w monoclonal antibodies

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.05.19.21257469v2

Both REGEN-COV 2400mg and 1200mg significantly reduced Covid-19-related hospitalization or all-cause death compared to placebo (71.3% reduction [1.3% vs 4.6%; p<0.0001] and 70.4% reduction [1.0% vs 3.2%; p=0.0024], respectively). The median time to resolution of Covid-19 symptoms was 4 days shorter in both dose arms vs placebo (10 vs 14 days; p<0.0001).

Dr McCullough recommends them for all his at-risk patients.

The antibodies are only useful during the viral stage.  Once day 8 is passed, it will be progressively less useful.

Here’s the FLCCC early treatment protocol.  Dr McCullough likes to remind us – on all of his podcasts – that everyone’s case is “mild” at first.

https://covid19criticalcare.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/FLCCC-Alliance-I-MASKplus-Protocol-ENGLISH.pdf

From what I’ve read, the nasal sprays and the gargles are incredibly effective.  That’s where the virus lives – the nose and throat.  Killing it where it lives, early, might save you a whole lot of annoyance after day 8.  Details are important though – some chemicals work, some don’t, and the FLCCC has done the heavy lifting for all of us here.

Also note: FLCCC has the monoclonal antibodies on their protocol too.

I suspect – but since I’m not a doctor, I’m not certain – that the warning on the label for monoclonal antibodies (“i.e. ADE”) should also be a warning on the package insert for all these spike-protein vaccines.

You might also ask your doctor how long the mABS will be in your blood stream, and if the ADE risk is limited to that time period, or if the mABS are “training” your immune system over the long term the same way the “safe and effective” shots are doing.

  • Wed, Sep 22, 2021 - 11:55pm

    #4
    Aria

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    Monoclonal Antibodies

Bill, I saw that statement as well and it made me hesitant to seek this treatment without knowing more.  That statement is concerning because it sounds like taking this treatment will hinder your body’s ability to respond to an infection in the future. Why would I take a treatment now that will hurt me in the future? I have been unable to find an answer to this question.

  • Thu, Sep 23, 2021 - 02:20am

    #5
    Chovy

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    Monoclonal Antibodies

This drug, as well as remdesivir, was tested in a 2018-2019 trial for Ebola in Africa.  Of the 4 drugs used, two were monoclonal antibodies (MAb114 and REGN-EB3).  The report states that the two monoclonal antibody drugs had “superior” results (killing only 35.1% & 33.5% respectively) over the ZMAPP and remdesivir (killing 51.3%).

Superior???  The CDC and WHO boast of the sterling track record of remdesivir using this Ebola study.  But it seems that nobody looked up the trial to see that remdesivir was halted after 6 months of a 12 months study due to the high death rate.

I did not put together the REGN-EB3 in the Ebola trial and the current use of monoclonal antibodies until your post with “REGEN” treatment.  Holy cow!

Thank you Bill!

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