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Medical stockpile question

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  • Sat, Mar 14, 2009 - 05:17pm

    #1

    plantguy90

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    Medical stockpile question

Ok, I’m in the US, and I want to know how one goes about stocking and storing basic antibiotics.  Here are my questions:

1) I have no perscription, and would rather not manufacture one at a doctor’s.

2) Isn’t the shelf life of antibiotics limited? 

Our family is of relatively good health, I cant remember tha last time I took any medicine, but my toddler has gotten sick a few times from playing with other children so its more for just in case the kids get sick.

 

 

  • Sat, Mar 14, 2009 - 05:38pm

    #2
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Re: Medical stockpile question

I take a pill everyday for high blood pressure. I have found that I can get this drug out of India through a company called International drug mart.

I’ve been using this company for a couple of years and they have been  very reliable and are known for supplying generics sometimes not available in the U.S and although this drug was initially prescribed to me by a local physician, this company does not require one (although Bush seemed to just hate the idea that I could buy cheap generic drugs without a prescription outside the U.S.).

I keep a three month supply as back-up which I rotate as I use it.

While antibiotics have a shelf life, this is much extended by keeping them in the fridge.

IN AN EMERGENCY–Yes, I screamed that because IMO this is not a good practice; the common antibiotics and needles for injection etc. can be bought without a prescription at your local vet supply store.

During the anthrax scare, I did exactly that.

 

 

  • Sat, Mar 14, 2009 - 07:08pm

    #3
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    Re: Medical stockpile question

 

The shelf life of antibiotics can be dramatically increased by refrigeration.  However, be careful, as some antibiotics, notably the tetracyclines, become toxic as they deteriorate, and can do organ damage.  Long term, it’s probably best to have an alternative to pharmaceutical antibiotics. They cause a decrease in immune function, and tend to create the need for more antibiotics.  There are herbal alternatives that will not do this, and that are easily renewable by growing your own.  This is a far safer and more sustainable method than relying on a pharmaceutical industry whose integrity is questionable, anyway.  Herbal Antibiotics — Natural Alternatives for Treating Drug-Resistant Bacteria by Stephen Harrod Buhner is a good place to start.

Additionally, I would say that the best way to prepare for the upcoming crisis is to position yourself not to rely on conventional healthcare.  This means keeping your immune system strong, through nutrition and healthy lifestyle, and avoiding toxins whenever possible.  The vast majority of disease, including infections, cancer, heart disease, hypertension, fibromyalgia, arthritis, chronic fatigue, on and on, are caused by toxins in our environment and food and nutritional deficiencies.  These diseases can be prevented by a process called detoxification, in which those toxins are bound and excreted from the body.  This is the single most important key to getting and staying healthy.

That leaves traumatic injury as something we need to prepare for.  I think it’s a good idea for everybody to have some basic trauma treatment training, eg hemorrhage, fractures, etc. 

Hope this helps.  Full disclosure:  I’m a critical care RN, self-educated in herbalism.

 

  • Sat, Mar 14, 2009 - 08:18pm

    #4
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    Re: Medical stockpile question

[quote=c1oudfire]

Hope this helps.  Full disclosure:  I’m a critical care RN, self-educated in herbalism.

[/quote]

Cloud –

Here’s one for you.

Let’s say "someone" has been diagnosed with lone paroxysmal atrial fibrillation.  Normal cardiac morphology, asymptomatic, no family history, no associated risk factors.

Chemically controlled (and well tolerated) now with a pro-rhythmic and a low dose beta blocker, also daily aspirin.

Skip three doses and afib starts – as soon as I get back on the meds, normal rhythm within 30 minutes.

Are you aware of any "twigs and berries"or herbal solutions that can be used in the event Uncle Sam’s pharmacy is no longer in operation?

  • Sat, Mar 14, 2009 - 09:52pm

    #5
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    Re: Medical stockpile question

Dogs,

My advice is to stock up big-time from international pharmacies that don’t require a prescription.  I have done this very thing myself.

  • Sat, Mar 14, 2009 - 10:04pm

    #6
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    Re: Medical stockpile question

[quote=SteveR]

Dogs,

My advice is to stock up big-time from international pharmacies that don’t require a prescription.  I have done this very thing myself.

[/quote]

Steve –

If I was taking motrin or some generic OTC I might go overseas.  When it comes to my heart, I’d pull my kneecaps off with a soup spoon before trusting an overseas pharmacy.

Or I could just resign myself to fluttering away and risk throwing a clot – ya gotta go sometime anyway right?

  • Sat, Mar 14, 2009 - 10:34pm

    #7
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    Re: Medical stockpile question

I’m with you, dogs.

I don’t mean to bash herbs but you will have to experiment on yourself a bunch to get the same certitude of dosage . If you’re protocol aint broke, don’t fix it, IMHO.

SG

  • Sat, Mar 14, 2009 - 10:42pm

    #8
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    Re: Medical stockpile question

Dogs, as Bill Clinton says, "I feel your pain."

My wife is chained to pharmaceuticals in the same way you are. We have managed to get a month ahead in some, 3 in most, but if we had no access to drugs starting tomorrow, it would change our life in a way I cannot, rather will not imagine.

I have no solution that I can cook up in my backyard, so I have to believe Merck, Pharmacia, and others will exist in some form indefinitely. My focus has been on making sure I have the assets, whatever they may be, to pay for medical care. Dollars, gold, etc., whatever it takes, I have to have a plan.

If anyone sees where I am missing something, please let me know.

Rog

 

  • Sat, Mar 14, 2009 - 10:43pm

    #9
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    Re: Medical stockpile question

here’s a great site my sister gave me that discusses some guidelines for storing medicine:

http://www.survival-center.com/med-faq/

I saw the tetracycline issue on this website as well and it caught my eye as a contradiction to the chemist in me that said low temperatures slow chemical reactions.

The only other suggestion I might have, and I have no formal qualifications, is that deoxygenating and desiccating the environment for medicines should help them last longer. I certainly see no harm done in doing this, particularly if you are trying to store them as long as possible.

 

  • Sat, Mar 14, 2009 - 11:28pm

    #11
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    Re: Medical stockpile question

[quote=Mike Pilat]

I saw the tetracycline issue on this website as well and it caught my eye as a contradiction to the chemist in me that said low temperatures slow chemical reactions.

The only other suggestion I might have, and I have no formal qualifications, is that deoxygenating and desiccating the environment for medicines should help them last longer. I certainly see no harm done in doing this, particularly if you are trying to store them as long as possible.

 

[/quote]

Hi, Mike;

I hope I didn’t confuse anyone.  You are  right . .  decreasing storage temperature will slow reaction speed and generally lengthen shelf life of just about anything.  What I meant to say is that, while one can increase the shelf life of many drugs this way, it is risky with drugs like tetracycline that become toxic when they do degrade.  In other words, I just wouldn’t push past the expiration date on the tetracyclines.

Do not freeze meds . . . the freeze/thaw cycle can result in condensation, and turn the bottle contents to mush.

Your idea of low oxygen and moisture make sense, though I know of no specific data for low oxygen environments.  Low moisture is a no-brainer, as the drug companies often pack dessicants with their meds.  If your meds come in a sealed bottle with a dessicant pack, it’s probably best to store them in the fridge.

 

To all;

If you are on meds that are critical to your health, I advise that you have at least a 3 month supply on hand, and have plan B (herbs and other alternative therapies) in place, before a supply crisis occurs.  There are many alternatives to conventional pharmaceuticals, and though the transition cannot be made overnight, with research and time, many people find that they’re not as dependent on the meds as they thought they were. 

At the risk of sounding like a broken record, I highly recommend detoxification strategies for most diseases.  Often, when the body is cleared of the accumulated toxins, diseases improve or resolve completely, and meds become unnecessary.  This includes conditions that are thought to be terminal, such as cancer and heart disease.  A great starting point for the layperson is Detoxify or Die by Dr. Sherry Rogers, M.D..

 

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