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Massive Fire In Napa/Sonoma Counties in California

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  • Fri, Oct 13, 2017 - 03:28pm

    #61

    suziegruber

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    Effect on Housing in Sonoma County

Chris,
Yes, some of the areas affected are quite pricey.  However, the Coffee Park neighborhood, which was leveled, is a very middle class neighborhood.  The Tubbs fire also leveled the Journey's End mobile home park and damaged several homes in the Coddingtown mobile home park.  Here's a list of damaged buildings.  The housing crisis in Sonoma County was awful before this, especially pressuring people on the low to middle end of the socioeconomic scale.  I had dinner at restaurant in Sebastopol last night and happened to sit next to a couple who lost their home in the fire but they own a residential property management business.  They said there is nothing available.  They plan to advocate to Sonoma County to make it much easier for people to add granny units when they rebuild, a movement already underway before the fires.  These fires will negatively affect housing pricing and availability here in Sonoma County and neighboring counties for a long time to come.  How ironic that I am moving to Ashland, Oregon next Wednesday.

–Suzie

  • Fri, Oct 13, 2017 - 04:07pm

    #62
    mntnhousepermi

    mntnhousepermi

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    granny units

If I recall, second units can already be added to large enough lots. If you take a tight neighborhood, and then say they can have granny units, well, first, there is not enough parking, and then, the roads in that housing tract are not made for proper egress for doubling the cars. Imagine evacuating Coffey Park with double the cars. Also, from what I have seen, sometimes granny units go to houisng, but alot go to air BnB, legally or illegally. An existing, laid out neighborhood should not just be rezoned to double houing units.

  • Fri, Oct 13, 2017 - 06:20pm

    #63

    suziegruber

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    Re: Granny Units

The effort to increase granny units is focused on large enough rural, residential properties and not in true suburban areas like Coffee Park.  The woman I was talking to about it has a 5 acre parcel.  The planning department in Sonoma County has a reputation of being extremely challenging when it comes to getting a permit even for clearly legal uses.  Delays in permitting already legal uses are not helpful when we are facing a massive housing shortage.

  • Fri, Oct 13, 2017 - 10:32pm

    #64
    Uncletommy

    Uncletommy

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    Consolation will be in short supply.

I was sickened to the core watching the reports come in from the Sonoma fires. These types of events from Australia to Spain to Fort MacMurray are only indicative of what may lie ahead. Recovery will not be easy and far from quick. Climatic disasters only add to our growing inability to cope. These disasters take a lot of emotional energy out of a population, and, despite a resilient and earnest community, the Santa Rosa area will feel the effects for a while to come. 

Friends of mine from the Fort Mac area have told me it has changed the community drastically. Yes, recovery is happening, but many a displaced person will only see gloom on their return. A once vibrant community will only know a history of what once was. A bright future is many years away. One more reason to applaud PP's efforts in making us aware of the importance of "emotional resilience".  Perhaps our "Long Emergency ", is only just beginning

https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/2017/05/after-the-fire-recovery-in-fort-mcmurray/525249/

  • Sat, Oct 14, 2017 - 03:05pm

    #65
    PaulJam

    PaulJam

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    Eucalyptus trees

I wonder if there were lots of eucalyptus trees in the burned out areas.  If so, parts of the backstory that I've not heard yet is that these trees are invasive (were not part of California's flora 200 years ago), and are highly flammable.  They are certainly exceptionally abundant in some areas of California.and have exacerbated destructive fires in the past.

https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2013/06/12/eucalyptus-california-icon-fire-hazard-and-invasive-species/

  • Sat, Oct 14, 2017 - 03:13pm

    #66
    mntnhousepermi

    mntnhousepermi

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    PaulJam wrote: I wonder if

[quote=PaulJam]

I wonder if there were lots of eucalyptus trees in the burned out areas.  If so, parts of the backstory that I've not heard yet is that these trees are invasive (were not part of California's flora 200 years ago), and are highly flammable.  They are certainly exceptionally abundant in some areas of California.and have exacerbated destructive fires in the past.

https://ww2.kqed.org/science/2013/06/12/eucalyptus-california-icon-fire-hazard-and-invasive-species/

[/quote]

 

NO

  • Sat, Oct 14, 2017 - 03:24pm

    #67

    shastatodd

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    ashland

"How ironic that I am moving to Ashland, Oregon next Wednesday."

ashland like here in mount shasta, both have severe housing shortages. most of the local rentals here have been converted to short time vacation rentals. even our new city planning director had a super difficult time finding a place to rent.

good luck with your life in ashland and wave at "the mountain" as you pass by.

todd

  • Sat, Oct 14, 2017 - 10:36pm

    #68

    Adam Taggart

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    Body Cam Video

While the fires are moving farther away, evacuations are still happening throughout Sonoma and Napa counties.

The Santa Rosa police department recently released this body cam video from Sunday night, which shows how violent the blaze was then and how little warning folks had to evacuate:

  • Sat, Oct 14, 2017 - 11:15pm

    #69

    pinecarr

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    Intense video, Adam

Holy Sh1t!!  The closeness and intenseness of the fire shown in the body cam video is terrifying!  I can't believe some of the conditions the officer was driving through. I have a renewed respect and appreciation  for all the police and fire fighters who put themselves in harm's way trying to evacuate people from these fires, and to save them and their homes.  Incredible.

  • Sun, Oct 15, 2017 - 01:57am

    #70

    Michael_Rudmin

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    I’d almost suggest…

…  instead of granny units, design buildings on the basis of the double Tee (useful in parking deck design), and the foam-insulated monolithic rock house.

    Build them on up to 1-sq-mile ranches that are used for gardens, in squared-step pyramid fashion, with each floor being 20' narrower in both dimensions than the previous floor.  That way, the pyramid can be exited from any floor.  A typical floor plan, then, would be:  bottom floor, 1200' x 1200'.  Second floor centered on the first, 1180' x 1180'… and so on, up to 59th floor.  Each floor is on high-friction quake bearings, so as to resist earthquake motions (it being CA). 

   Escape is easy; most people can have their unit with a window; interior locations can be dedicated to business and/or education.  Many features can be combined (such as laundry), resulting in 800-sq.-ft apartments being suitable for even large families. 

   The design is also scalable:  it can start small, and be expanded as more people desire to be there.

    However, the one I described above, would have 29 million square feet, and if it had one business square foot for each residential square foot, then it could support a population of 18400.

     To defend such a unit against fire, you simply need to bring combustibles inside out of the range of the fire.   

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