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Looming Mental Health Collapse – U.S: 5% Of World Pop, 2/3rds Of All Psych Meds, 1 in 10 on Anti-Depressants

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  • Fri, Mar 01, 2013 - 07:20pm

    #31
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Two more titles on mindfulness

Mental health practitioners have adopted some Zen principles in Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (DBT) but it is not the same.  Too expensive for some and perhaps overdone but useful for some.

I find books easier and these practices can be done on or off meds or any other therapies. Cheri Huber has a kind simple way of writing and explaining that I relate to:

The Fear Book

The Depression Book

 

  • Sat, Mar 02, 2013 - 02:51am

    #32
    John Lemieux

    John Lemieux

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    Very Good Post Nelly

Thanks for introducing the topic of mindfulness.

 I also believe that the practice of meditation and mindfulness can not only help to manage of even prevent depression for some people, but that it can greatly enhance our capacity to apprechiate the experience of being alive. And I agree that this practice helps us to become more present and aware. And to experience more fully our moment to moment existence as opposed to worrying about (fearing) the future or dwelling on the past.

I believe that this practice combined with regular exercise, a "healthy diet" and meaningful social connections can be an effective substitute for ant-depressant medications. But I also agree with you that ant-depressant medication is helpful, and even necessary for some sufferers as well.

I would recommend the 8 week guided minfulness/meditation practice availible from Jon Kabot Zinn. He also wrote a book on mindfulness practice called Full Catastrophe Living. 

Here is a link to a book he co-wrote with two other authors about using the practice of mindfulness as a way to change the thinking patterns that can cause people to spiral into depression.

http://www.amazon.ca/The-Mindful-Way-through-Depression/dp/1593851286

 

  • Sat, Mar 02, 2013 - 01:37pm

    #33

    Nervous Nelly

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    Interesting points

AndyG,

          Your in the medical field and thumbs up on your posts. I'm not from the field but pro active when it concerns my loved ones health and I.  I'd like to ask what is your take on colloidal silver as a post peak alternative medicine. There seems to be all sorts of pros and cons when I search the web. The world population is already facing all kinds of antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria. I sense that one of these days there will be a major epidemic with one of these bugs. How will we cope?

thx 

Sonya

  • Sat, Mar 02, 2013 - 02:28pm

    #34
    Hladini

    Hladini

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    Forced Medicine

It is not surprising that America is the number 1 medicated population on the planet.  Americans are exposed to over 100,000 chemicals on a regular basis.  Many chemicals are neurotoxic, endocrine disruptors. 

Food Matters has some great information where high doses of Niacin are used in the treatment of depression.

I coined a saying:  You can't blame the American public because Americans are vaccinated, medicated, flouridated, chlorinated, fed shit for food and shit for news. 

  • Sat, Mar 02, 2013 - 02:36pm

    #35
    Hladini

    Hladini

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    WOW!

Amazing.  The "cure" is worse than the disease.

 

  • Sun, Mar 03, 2013 - 01:11pm

    #36
    Hladini

    Hladini

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    Forced Mediciine 2

I recently took a divorce case in Florida where the Wife and I attended a domestic violence hearing (which was dismissed on a technicality) and instead, my client was Baker Acted.  Although my client voluntarily submitted to the examination, and even though she was in therapy with a psychologist, the psychiatrist diagnosed my client with bi-polar and pyschosis (NEVER conferring with her psychologist) and then prescribed a coctail of psychotropic drugs, which my client refused to take.

Only because she refused to take the coctail of psychotropic drugs, the facility filed for involuntary placement and would not release her (although they claimed she was incapable of caring for herself).  On the fifth day and after meeting with the third psychiatrist, and only after agreeeing to take one of the recommended meds, she was told she would be released the next day.

This woman never had suicide ideations, never had homocidal ideations, and was taking perfectly good care of herself, but "medicine" was forced on her under the threat of further "detention" at the facility. This was my first experience with forced medicine, and I did not like it.

I am soooo hoping for a lawsuit!

  • Sun, Mar 03, 2013 - 01:18pm

    #37
    Hladini

    Hladini

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    A Satire

Sandpuppy, tell me this is satire, please!

  • Thu, Mar 21, 2013 - 07:15am

    #38
    Calamity Jane

    Calamity Jane

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    Oh look, I’ve found a soapbox!

In the midst of a glorious response to so many well-thought out points, questions, theories and other….my phone died, and that is just damn frustrating. But I will be replying tomorrow, because this is a great discussion, and I want a piece! 

C.J.

  • Thu, Mar 21, 2013 - 10:10am

    #39
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

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    Mad in America.

 

To get the full exposé on Big Pharma’s  relationship to mental health please read "Mad in America." by Whitacre. 

Especially the chapter “Play it Again. Sam”

Briefly: A new drug is discovered and patented. It has a 30 year patent during which time the Company makes a lot of money for the share holders, especially if they can convince the cost to come out of the public purse. Typically $200 per patient  victim per week.

The rate of schizophrenia in the general population is a consistent 1%. In the USA this equates to,  lets see, 280million x 0.01 x $200 per week. A cool $560,000,000. Per week. Or $29.12 Billion per annum.

But then the patent runs out and the Giant Pharmaceutical company discovers that “Who would have thunk? The medicine was not better than placebo, but had a lot of nasty side effects.” (Tardive dyskinesia).

” But never mind, by pure serendipity we have discovered (and patented) a new product. This is not like the old drug this is the All New atypical neuroleptic.”

“We call it that because it means nothing to the victim, but sounds like a lab coat with a stethoscope around it’s neck said it.”

There have been many iterations of this game. Anyone for sub-orbital lobotomy? That was the miracle cure of yesteryear. 

  • Thu, Mar 21, 2013 - 11:55am

    #40
    AndyG

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    Arthur Robey wrote:Briefly:

[quote=Arthur Robey]

Briefly: A new drug is discovered and patented. It has a 30 year patent during which time the Company makes a lot of money for the share holders, especially if they can convince the cost to come out of the public purse.

[/quote]

Are you sure? I thought it was 10 years, but wiki says this: 'In the US, drug patents give 20 years of protection, but they are applied for before clinical trials begin, so the "effective" life of a drug patent tends to be between seven and 12 years.'

this is because the costs of researching, licensing etc comes into the hundred's of millions $ these days, and more often than not a medication never makes it into use. ie $$$ down the drain. so I have no problem with a reasonable patent to enable them to recoup the costs. Otherwise there would be no research etc.

 

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