Investing in Precious Metals 101 Ad

Laser Eye Surgey – Who Here Has Had It?

Login or register to post comments Last Post 2589 reads   20 posts
Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 20 total)
  • Sat, Oct 19, 2013 - 06:04am

    #11
    hammer6166

    hammer6166

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 30 2010

    Posts: 23

    count placeholder

    LASIK in 1999

I had my LASIK in 1999.  The doctor explained the procedure would reset my vision to 20/20.  My procedure used a metal keratome to create a flap, not the laser which is often used today.  The next day I was 20/20 with my vision eventually settling at 20/10.  Recovery was quick with slight watering of my eyes which was fixed with the anti-inflammatory drops they gave me.  There is some starring in my night vision that is most noticeable when looking at street lights.  It was fun to see farther than my young nieces and nephews. Now, 15 years later, my eyes have drifted enough that I'll soon need glasses or LASIK again.

Cost was the only real negative for me.  I wore contacts which cost about $350 a year to maintain.  I think the procedure was $4800 in 1999 (I'm in Silicon Valley where everything is more expensive) which makes it roughly break even.  I did get to avoid sticking fingers in my eyes every morning and evening which is worth something, too 🙂  Sand volleyball, swimming, running, seeing the clock in the morning are just some of the many things improved by having the procedure.

As a point of resiliency, LASIK wins in my book.  Storing 15 years of contacts and solution would be a problem.  The same goes for glasses.  I think clear, starred night vision is better than my blurry night vision but I know others that had the procedure that were annoyed by the starring.

 

  • Sat, Oct 19, 2013 - 11:46am

    #12

    Greg Snedeker

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 22 2012

    Posts: 380

    count placeholder

    Funny, I see both sides

of this issue. Couldn't resist the pun. I'm 47 and was contemplating lasik about 5 years ago. My daughter, 2 at that time, was constantly pulling my glasses off my face. One pair broke, the next were scratched, the $$ were adding up with the cost of glasses. I was near-sighted, and had to wear glasses to drive (by law of course), and especially at night because of my astigmatism. I tried contacts for months (many different kinds), but my eyes couldn't stand them. So I stopped wearing anything… and my eyes improved. I took the eye test two years ago at the dmv and passed no problem. I haven't used glasses or contacts for the past 5 years and although I do find my glasses still make things more focused, for the most part, I only use them when reading music from a couple feet away. I know your vision changes in your 40s, and that things farther away get a little easier to see, and that you eventually need the bifocals for close up reading, but I haven't needed reading glasses yet. I wonder how long this will last, but I have to say it's been nice not having to wear my glasses. I expect my eyes will continue to change and I will eventually contemplate lasik again. I hear Montreal gives great packages, and it's a bonus my in-laws live there. Good to hear some of the concerns as well, I guess nothing is without risks.

  • Sat, Oct 19, 2013 - 12:21pm

    #13

    Amanda Witman

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 17 2008

    Posts: 153

    count placeholder

    I’ve considered this, too

The price tag is a deterrent, but I can see that it would be an investment.

My concern would also be that my eyes would worsen.  It's reassuring to hear that prescription stability for some years beforehand can translate into less of that.

I was told that average folks with decent eyesight start needing reading glasses around age 40, and people who are "naturally" nearsighted start needing them around age 45.  I'm only 40, so maybe it would be prudent to wait (and hope the option is still available in 5 years or so)?

However, if the eventual relapse is minor compared to my current prescription, it would probably still be worth it…my glasses are pretty strong.

Chris, I'll be asking you who did yours and the price tag…

 

  • Sat, Oct 19, 2013 - 01:46pm

    #14
    Petey1

    Petey1

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Sep 13 2012

    Posts: 13

    count placeholder

    Wife loves it

My wife had it done about 10 years ago and has zero regrets. She does the books for a eye doctor and he recommended it. 

  • Sat, Oct 19, 2013 - 02:06pm

    #15

    Rector

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 07 2010

    Posts: 330

    count placeholder

    Changed Everything

My wife had LASIK about four years ago.  When I became aware of the vulnerabilities in our lives, I decided that having my partner in life totally blind without contacts was a major weakness. She considered it, made an appointment, and was thrilled at the idea of ditching contacts and glasses. 

The surgery was about $3500, went flawlessly, and remains the best money we have spent in many years. It is truly a miracle. Her vision is better than it has ever been.  

Rector

  • Sat, Oct 19, 2013 - 06:09pm

    #16

    nickbert

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 14 2009

    Posts: 263

    count placeholder

    Overall positive experience for my wife….

…. but I noticed that for about 3 or 4 years after her eyes suffered from dryness on a regular basis and required using eye drops regularly. It's better now, but she still finds the need to use eye drops every so often. Granted some of it would be due to living in dry and/or cold climates (Colorado, Alaska, Mongolia), but it was something she never had to do before the surgery.

Despite almost everyone in my family eventually wearing glasses, genetics somehow cut me a break and I've had good vision so far into my 30's. I expect I may eventually need reading glasses in future years like many, but unless my vision deteriorates to a great degree I think I will forego any eye surgery. For me it would need to mean a very substantial improvement in quality of life, rather than alleviating an inconvenience.

– Nick

  • Sat, Oct 19, 2013 - 10:13pm

    #17
    treemagnet

    treemagnet

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 14 2011

    Posts: 279

    count placeholder

    My wife and I

Had ours done, never looked back.  Just do it.

  • Sun, Oct 20, 2013 - 05:10pm

    #18

    Wendy S. Delmater

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 13 2009

    Posts: 1418

    count placeholder

    hmmm – HSA?

The comment about having your prescription stabilized for a while before getting laser eye surgery to correct my vision makes sense. I could have had it done years ago but my eyes kept getting worse, and I said to myself – what if they change after the surgery? 

My Rx for my glasses has not changed much in the last 10 years, and no change at all in the last 5, I may do it now, if we can scrape up the cash. We are checking into whether or not our Health Savings Account (HSA) will cover it. (An HSA is made up of pretax dollars and if you do it right, it does not effect your after-tax income. _

  • Mon, Oct 21, 2013 - 01:25am

    #19

    SingleSpeak

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Nov 30 2008

    Posts: 166

    count placeholder

    I had it done a few years ago

and part of the deal was if my eye sight changes (and it can be fixed) they'll redo it for free.

I don't know if this is the standard deal or not.

SS

  • Mon, Oct 21, 2013 - 06:38am

    #20
    aggie74

    aggie74

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 07 2013

    Posts: 9

    count placeholder

    Pros and cons

My best friend and I both had lasix done in 2001. I had one eye tweaked afterwards. I use eyedrops every am before I get out of bed and it is like a miracle for someone who was legally blind without glasses.

 

My friend, on the other hand, has had many complications. At night she has the halo effect. Earlier  this year, at age 59, she had cataract surgery, then this summer a detached retina with complications. That eye will never fully regain normaL vision. She was told at that time that eye surgery increased the chance of a detached retina. She is now having cataract surgery redone in both eyes. So, closely investigate possible problems down the road. She was told being very nearsided increased the chances of later detachment.

Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 20 total)

Login or Register to post comments