I need advice

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  • Mon, Nov 08, 2021 - 11:13pm

    #11
    davefairtex

    davefairtex

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    here’s a thought

I call this the “test mouse” approach.  (I use myself as a test mouse all the time, FWIW).  Here’s my concept:

“I read this report by a doctor in Canada that a bunch of his patients ended up with microclots.  A number of them reported “somewhat reduced” cardio capacity.  The doctor documented this situation using a d-dimer test; he claimed that 60% of his patients ended up having very high d-dimer levels, which indicated that some sort of clotting was definitely going on, which explains the reduced cardio and other symptoms.

But here’s the thing.  Who is to say that 60% of his patients didn’t have clotting before the vaccine was given?

So if you’re dead set on getting the shot anyway, I think we can make use of this to move science forward.  I’ll pay for a d-dimer test for you both before, and after vaccination.  That way if you do get injured, you’ll have great documentation (“see!  d-dimers before and after = proof of vaccine injury!”) which hopefully you can use to get the government to pay you some kind of compensation (which they haven’t done yet – but there’s always a first time).  What’s more, I can use this information to help my other friends and family going forward.

‘My friend joe got clots right after the shot.  Here’s the evidence.’

Or – maybe it isn’t really a 60% incidence.  Maybe nothing happens, and we’re all good.  Think of it like donating your body to science – just in case.”

The poor guy really is being a test mouse – just for Pfizer.  And nobody is really checking up on him after the test is over.

I’d also tell him that I probably would not get the shot, knowing what I know.  But everyone has to chart their own course in life.

https://www.findlabtest.com/lab-test/blood-tests-for-heart-disease/d-dimer-labcorp-115188

[not associated with any of these companies]

  • Tue, Nov 09, 2021 - 12:24am

    #12
    dryam2000

    dryam2000

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    D-dimer tests

D-dimer tests are helpful in ruling out blood clots to the lungs in people who have a low pre-test probability.  There are numerous processes that can cause an elevated d-dimer including an inflammatory response from a vaccination.  So, an elevated d-dimer provides essentially no useful information.

  • Tue, Nov 09, 2021 - 12:41am

    #13
    davefairtex

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    so which test should we use?

Ok.  Sounds like that Canadian doctor who used the d-dimer tests to identify the presence of micro-clots in his patients who suffered from reduced cardio capacity didn’t know what he was talking about.  [Either that, or I totally misunderstood what he was saying.]

So what before-and-after test should we use to identify post-vax micro-clotting?

  • Tue, Nov 09, 2021 - 12:52am

    #14
    cellima

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    Reply To: I need advice

I would ask him questions.

 

Ask him questions like you are seeking his advise. Maybe phrase it something like “I’m getting a lot of pressure too and am thinking about getting it, but I’m a little concerned about -xyz-, what did you think about that?”

You want him to actually think about it, not just throw a ton of information at him. I’ve found that people will think more carefully if they think they are giving YOU advice,you have to direct their research with specific questions though.

  • Tue, Nov 09, 2021 - 11:00am

    #15
    hotsauce

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    I need advice

Dave said:

So what before-and-after test should we use to identify post-vax micro-clotting?

I don’t know about testing for blood clotting in particular, but get a decent pulse oximeter and test his resting heart rate before and after the shot. It also helps to know the average heart rate for a male his age to know how normal each number is.

Once you’ve gotten him to sit down and have his heart rate measured Dave’s idea of treating him a bit like a test mouse might give him pause. Tell him there is usually at least minor heart damage and blood clotting. Tell him it will be interesting to see how much his heart rate goes up and for how long; it might be permanent.

  • Tue, Nov 09, 2021 - 02:02pm

    #16
    davefairtex

    davefairtex

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    yeah i like that

Maybe he can [EDIT] WALK up the stairs, and measure heart rate – pre vax.

Then tell him to do the same thing post-vax. Measure heart rate after.

[I previously said run.  Maybe walking is better.]

Say you’ve heard many reports on issues, but you seem them as being poorly documented, and you’d like to document vaccination effects properly so as to be able to “follow the science.”

And who knows.  Maybe no effect.  You can document that too.  And there’s always the second shot.

“It will be a fun science experiment!”  That hundreds of millions of people are participating in.  But its just tragic they have such poor follow up.

“Country doesn’t like to follow the science as far as I can tell.”

Which seems to be true.

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