Houston, we have a problem

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  • Mon, Jun 21, 2021 - 11:54pm

    #1

    Jim H

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    Houston, we have a problem

  • Tue, Jun 22, 2021 - 12:01am

    #2

    Jim H

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    Houston, we have a problem

Reset, reset, reset…

  • Tue, Jun 22, 2021 - 12:07am

    #3

    Jim H

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    Houston, we have a problem

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/06/21/american-airlines-cancels-flights-due-to-staffing-maintenance-issues.html

AIRLINES
American Airlines cancels hundreds of flights due to staffing crunch, maintenance issues

Yeah, right.

  • Tue, Jun 22, 2021 - 08:22am

    #4
    Rhapsodilly

    Rhapsodilly

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    Can you hear me Major Tom?

Ground control to Major Tom, Your circuit’s dead, there’s something wrong. Can you hear me Major Tom?  Can you hear me Major Tom?

(Dark, evil laughter from The Emperor)

Everything is proceeding as I have forseen.

  • Tue, Jun 22, 2021 - 08:43am

    #5
    brushhog

    brushhog

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    Reply To: Houston, we have a problem

Two things come to mind;

1. Are the flights really being cancelled due to lack of pilots OR is the airline’s vaccine requirement keeping people off the planes? If 50% of the public has not been vaccinated, and an airline is requiring proof of vaccination…they just cut demand for their service by 50%. 10% is a hit to any business…50%? Without massive government subsidies they wouldnt last a month.

2. If really due to pilot shortage, I wonder if the increased pressure in the cockpit may be doing something to stimulate bloodclots faster?

  • Tue, Jun 22, 2021 - 04:28pm

    #6

    jturbo68

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    Houston, we have a problem

Do we know that it is a shortage of pilots?   Planes cannot fly without the required numbers of flt attendants as well.

A lot of persons including pilots were furloughed last fall.

  • Tue, Jun 22, 2021 - 04:43pm

    #7
    Dontknownothin

    Dontknownothin

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    Houston, we have a problem

https://www.businessinsider.com/american-airlines-cancel-canceled-flights-per-day-labor-shortage-weather-2021-6?utm_source=knewz

Yes… that harzardous warm, clear and comfortable june weather… and since when did they start selling tickets for flights they couldn’t staff? Almost like something were happening to their current roster. But 80 flights per day is 2 pilots per flight and probably two flights each, which means there are likely 80 pilots from AA or more who have had sudden issues.

Delta Airlines however is expecting 1000 pilots to materialize by next year.

https://www.reuters.com/business/aerospace-defense/delta-says-it-is-hiring-more-than-1000-pilots-by-next-summer-memo-2021-06-21/?utm_source=knewz

Here is another story about all the job openings as airlines ramp back up. Which is what American Airlines should be doing rather than cancelling flights…

https://www-wfaa-com.cdn.ampproject.org/c/s/www.wfaa.com/amp/article/money/airlines-hiring-in-north-texas/287-4a54c517-3fa5-4379-90ed-11f45677fd2b?utm_source=knewz

There’s a lot of ways to interpret this though. Yes its a valid excuse to ramp up post covid operations. But contrasted with American Airlines cancelling 2500 flights over the next month seems odd. Yes, I want to believe theres shortages all around and am seeing them everywhere I go now, but usually a business will poach its critical personel from other companies, and once a flight is booked, its odd to cancel it without mechanical issues or otherwise. Its just how business operates, more flights means more revenue.

The other thing to remember is that these airlines in particular were considered critical infrastructure after 9/11 and 2008 and received LOTS of money to continue operations. And since pilots are a critical part of that and so difficult to train, they don’t just lay them off like a factory worker. This is an asinine excuse for us plebes and makes me want to dig deeper into the story.

  • Tue, Jun 22, 2021 - 05:06pm   (Reply to #6)

    #8
    Dontknownothin

    Dontknownothin

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    Houston, we have a problem

Flight attendants are easier to train than pilots and airlines don’t generally lay off pilots without pay. They want to keep them on the roster for just this sort of need. It may be though, that they are anticipating replacement parts shortages, but 80 flights spread around the country is not really that big of an impact on inventory. And they will typically pass those extra “priority shipping” costs on to the consumer, so its hard to rationalize their actions here. Its not like the restart dates were kept secret or anything, they knew last december when the “return to normal” was scheduled so this type of planning oversight is pretty egregious for a company whose entire business runs on scheduling and resource allocation.

  • Tue, Jun 22, 2021 - 05:22pm

    #9
    DennisC

    DennisC

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    Houston, we have a problem

Ka-ching.  Let’s make a deal.  Get those retired folks to give up their relaxing afternoons and get back in the cockpit.  Maybe there are some career armed forces pilots looking for a nice 6-figure payday.  Either way, we pay.  Nothing a bootload of taxpaper dollars (or freshly printed fiat) can’t solve.

I’m sure this situation has probably caught everyone by surprise (from July 2019).

The Department of Defense (DoD)now faces a pilot short fall in excess of 3,000 pilots, which has been several years in the making. While the severity and dynamic of the shortfall varies among the Military Services, all Services are experiencing pilot shortfalls due to several years of underproduction in pilot training and reduced aircraft readiness. These shortfalls have been exacerbated by higher than average attrition among experienced aviators.The internal challenges of underproduction and aircraft material readiness have resulted in extended time to train new aviators, a lack of sufficient flight time per pilot, extended and frequent deployments, and other quality of life concerns for aviators.

source

And this:

The Air Force and Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) are joining forces to address the troublesome pilot shortage both the service and the nation now face.

“This collaborative effort will enable the Air Force and the FAA to work with industry partners to share best practices and find ways to get more people to fly,” said Air Force Secretary Heather Wilson on May 31, the last day of her tenure in office.

source

  • Tue, Jun 22, 2021 - 05:48pm

    #10
    Pappy

    Pappy

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    Reply To: Houston, we have a problem

Prior to my being let go last year, I spent 40 weeks a year for almost a decade traveling for work by airline.

For those who don’t know, and (merely) by my estimation, almost half of all US flights are subcontracted pilots and planes. These pilots and airlines are operating on shoestring budgets.

I’ve spoken with dozens of commuter pilots over the years and they made squat for money. Most don’t get paid until wheels up and then stop getting paid upon wheels down.

When we talk about just in time (JIT) business models, at least half of all US airlines follow that strategy too

It doesn’t surprise me that we are seeing a shortage of pilots right now. Most of these aviators made under $30k a year puddle jumping. I seriously doubt they were kept on the payroll over the last 16 months.

The career 777 pilots most likely kept up their flight hours and ratings, but even six months of being grounded for these small commuter firms would be devastating to the able-bodied flight rosters.

And if I wasn’t paid for 6-16 months in that job, I’d look for other work no matter how much I enjoyed flying

Just my two cents…

 

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