Investing in precious metals 101

Health, Illness, Pharmaceuticals and Peak Oil

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Viewing 8 posts - 11 through 18 (of 18 total)
  • Thu, May 14, 2015 - 11:36am

    #11

    Arthur Robey

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 03 2010

    Posts: 1814

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    I Disagree Noetic

And I thank you for raising the subject

On a ship on the ocean the captain's decision is final. Even though he may be not have perfect knowledge. 

We cannot go back to a more innocent time, now that we know that in fact we are aboard a very small ship in a vast and hostile ocean. 

Our freedoms in this case are secondary to our survival. The moral issues are clear.

Yes that little dot is our ship.

 

Source NASA http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/cassini/20130722/pia17038a-full.jpg

  • Sat, Feb 11, 2017 - 06:35am

    #12
    skipr

    skipr

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 09 2016

    Posts: 127

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    medication and bikes

I'm 68 and my medication problems are primarily for an epileptic condition.  Right now they would put a serious crimp in my wallet if it wasn't for Medicare and my Supplemental plan.  I'm therefore considering corrective brain surgery in order to eliminate the blackouts and seizures that would occur without them.  I better do it soon before Medicare disappears.  All but one of the others can be replaced with a healthier diet and more exercise.  I wonder if the pharmacies would allow me to stock up on them before TSHTF.

As far as bikes and trikes go, I have ridden many different types.  I have owned mountain bikes, recumbents, and road bikes, but haven't ridden a trike.  They may be good in a rural area since their lack of visibility on larger city streets is scary.  They look like they are well suited to carry groceries etc.  A trailer may be a good alternative if you are riding a mountain or road bike.  I used to own one that could carry more than 200 pounds.  It was a significant tug though.  I would go for two grocery bag sized panniers on a road/mountain bike.  In the longer term I think you better be able to ride around with muddy and heavily pitted roads since we are probably past peak oil and, therefore, peak asphalt.  Mountain bikes will rule.  I doubt that bikes will disappear.  The amount of energy needed to make them is orders of magnitude below that required for cars etc etc.  About 20 years ago a friend went on a business trip to China.  When he got back he had a lot of stories about how a long string of bikers would somehow snake around the occasional car that would pass by.  I bet things are a lot different now.

I'm also looking into relocating to the northwest.  The northern end of the Olympic Peninsula is my #1 choice right now.  30 years ago I biked through there during my Seattle-San Francisco bike trip.  I was originally trying to get down to LA in 3 weeks.  I had to ride 80 miles a day to do it.  My relatives kept me too well fed, so I quit in SF.

  • Sat, Feb 11, 2017 - 02:35pm

    #13

    rheba

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 22 2009

    Posts: 46

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    bike option

Hi there – I gave up conventional bikes 20 years ago. You can get a recumbent trike with really good granny gears. If you don't have to contend with hills you will be fine. The two wheels will be on the front and you will be in a comfortable semi-reclining position. Look at Bentrider.com.

If you have hills or are weaker you might try putting on a RideKick trailer. I don't like electric bikes because they are heavy, they break down, bike guys hate to repair them etc. But with a trailer if you break down you pull the trailer off and chain it to a tree and ride home. Get the LiFePo battery, maybe two of them if you need to travel long distances.

That is my solution after 20 years of research, much wasted money…. You should expect to spend about what you would for a decent older used car.

  • Sat, Feb 11, 2017 - 03:23pm

    #14
    Yoxa

    Yoxa

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 20 2011

    Posts: 286

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    Adult trike

[quote] haven't ridden a trike.  They may be good in a rural area [/quote]

Yes. My grandfather had a trike which he rode around our small town for years. The terrain around here is mostly flat so it worked well unless winter weather got too difficult.

It had a big basket for carrying things, and of course balance was a lot more stable than it would have been with a two-wheeler.

The trike let him keep some independence once he was past driving a car. His last errand with the trike was less than a week before he died at age 96.

I don't have a trike yet but it's on my preps wish list.

  • Sun, Feb 12, 2017 - 02:58am

    #15
    skipr

    skipr

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 09 2016

    Posts: 127

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    more recumbents

I got into recumbents right after finishing that Seattle-San Francisco trip in 81.  I nearly got butt blisters after 6 days on that road bike.  I had to stand on the peddles all day during the 7th day.  The Avatar 2000 is what I bought after getting back:

http://ryanownersclub.com/scrapbook/avatar/

No more butt blisters, numb hands, sore neck etc etc with it.  I still have it, though it wouldn't be safe to ride now.  When I retired it I got this Vision R40:

http://visionrecumbentinfo.com/atpgallery/2000studio/r40lwb.jpg

I consider it the best recumbent ever made.  Unfortunately they went out of business after building a factory just before the dot com downturn.

While I was walking the dogs a guy on a trike passed by.  He was really close to the ground.  I would want a very bright flashing strobe light located as high as possible if I were to get one.

  • Sun, Feb 12, 2017 - 04:07am

    #16
    Edwardelinski

    Edwardelinski

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 23 2012

    Posts: 324

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    Gallbladder Challenge:

I have a place on the Cape.The price Martenson pays for insurance is standard in MA.Last year I needed a Gallbladder scan.Being Peak I decided to shop the price for the scan given the deductable.One hospital quoted me in the neighborhood of 600.00The other around 800.00.The billing dept was pissed that I even asked.Here is the rub,The holding company owns both hospitals.It gets better,6 weeks later I get a bill from Brigham and Williams  to the tune of 900.00.When the results come back they tell me immediate removal.I decide to consult off cape.The surgeon tells me not immediate or in the future.Not now or ever did i need the Ivy League consult for the gallbladder.They thought I did, operating under the guise of caring.The 10,000 surgery has not happened..And I am OK…

  • Sat, Aug 12, 2017 - 04:48pm

    #17
    Carol Bork

    Carol Bork

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 07 2017

    Posts: 3

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    elder living

I have/use an adult tricycle, and I really love it! I realize this comment is about 3 years after yours! LOL

  • Sat, Aug 12, 2017 - 07:27pm

    #18

    rheba

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 22 2009

    Posts: 46

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    Elder Living and recumbent trikes

I still ride my recumbent trike. Hills are still hard and help with bike repair is getting harder to come by. The cost of living is so high that young people can't afford to make/repair bikes

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