Hawaii

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  • Tue, Oct 19, 2010 - 12:10am

    #11
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    Re: Hawaii

[quote=SailAway]

Which US states does this CM community think will be among the best and worst places to be when the effect of peak oil happens?

[/quote]

Interesting question for which I have a personal opinion only. I’d completely write off Arizona, Nevada and SoCal. The Colorado river system of lakes are well below long term levels with no prospect of improvement. West coast North of the San Franscisco bay area should be OK. I would be concerned about the Northern plains states and the possibility of drought returning them to the dust bowl status of the early 20th century. The East coast is at risk of flooding (especially the South East) and worsening hurricanes. That leaves the North East, Great Lakes states and Pacific NorthWest as my preferred areas. Of those areas I think the New England states are most viable since they were settled in the era of horse and cart and the existing communities could easiy return to that lifestyle.

OTOH the impending collapse of our financial system could make peak oil somewhat moot. I see that as the most critical impending event and depending upon how global finance is restructured will depend upon how/whether we can finance the development of the post petroleum world.

YMMV

  • Tue, Oct 19, 2010 - 01:41am

    #12
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    Re: Hawaii

I lived in Oahu for five years, was married on the Big Island, and have returned frequently since leaving. We have considered relocating to Hawaii several times since leaving in 1994, to include a couple of job interviews on the Big Island, the most recent of which was earlier this year. Either the Big Island or Kauai would be reasonable destinations, given their lower population densities. Oahu is a potential powder keg, when the SHTF, and Maui is not much better, in my opinion. Migration from Oahu and Maui to Hawaii and Kauai is a possibility, but I suspect that a majority would relocate to areas in which they have family (Japan, California, etc.).

We have looked particularly at the Waimea (Kamuela) region of the Big Island, which is upcountry, in the northern part of the island. This is where the cattle ranching is located (Parker ranch being the most well known), and the scenery is reminiscent of the midwest continental U.S. albeit with ocean vistas in the background. The western (leeward) coast of Hawaii is the most arid, particularly along the northern (Kohala) coast. There are many beautiful resorts in this area, along the coast, but the inland portions are largely desolate lava fields. The southeastern portion of the island is less arid (although they have been experiencing a drought), and is best known for coffee and macadamia. The eastern (windward) coast has much more rain, and is quite lush. Overall, my choice would be upcountry Waimea, with a nice blending of some rain, cooler temperatures, and two large farmers’ markets with phenomenal produce year round.

My only real concern is the possibility of not being able to get back to the mainland to visit family when peak oil hits…

  • Tue, Oct 19, 2010 - 02:18am

    #13
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    Re: Hawaii

New Zealand is know as the Fortress of Doom for survivalists. Can anyone list the reasons that make it so, or not so?

XRM

  • Tue, Oct 19, 2010 - 02:44am

    #14
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    Re: Hawaii

[quote=SailAway]

Which US states does this CM community think will be among the best and worst places to be when the effect of peak oil happens?

I’m in Southern California and with virtually no rain, no fresh water close by, no well and a high population density it can’t hardly be worse.

Thanks

Fred

[/quote]

Hi Fred,

I too am in So Cal and I agree that water has to be the biggest issue here ( aside from population). I guess that if we had MANY fewer people then water may not be an issue. For water not to be an issue we would have to measure population in the hundreds not  millions.

I would like to relocate out of So Cal but I have a problem with family not wanting to leave.

 

 

  • Tue, Oct 19, 2010 - 03:32am

    #15
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    Re: Hawaii

[quote=ccpetersmd]

The southeastern portion of the island is less arid (although they have been experiencing a drought), and is best known for coffee and macadamia. 

[/quote]

That should have been southwestern portion of the island…

When did we lose the ability to edit our posts? Or, am I just unable to find an edit button?

Edited to say that while I can see an edit button on this particular post, as usual, there was no edit button on my earlier post in this thread, even though my post didn’t appear to have been quoted (except later, by me). Weird.

  • Tue, Oct 19, 2010 - 04:25am

    #16
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    Re: Hawaii

I noticed that too…. I think perhaps there’s now a time limit to go back and edit one’s posts.  Perhaps an hour?

– Nickbert

  • Tue, Oct 19, 2010 - 06:05am

    #17
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    Re: Hawaii

Thanks to all for your replies about the best and worst places in the US in case things go very bad.
We don’t have fresh water in So Cal but I’m still working on a plan…. We have a lot of sun so solar electricity is not an issue. We don’t need heating and I personally never switch on AC. Water is of course the big problem but I’m close to the ocean so I’m looking at water makers , the kind we use on boats. Fishing for food is definitely an option. I’m also looking at solar ovens to cook. Growing vegetables seems to be close to mission impossible with so little water though…

Actually what concerned me the most is even if I figure out a great plan, I have no idea how I could protect my family if millions of people around us lack water or food… And building a community in town doesn’t seem to be very realistic either.

Fred.

  • Wed, Jan 05, 2011 - 05:20pm

    #18
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    Re: Hawaii

From what I understand (I visited Kauai for 2 months in 2007) the islands are highly dependent on imports. Most of the soil has been depleted by industrial monocropping. That makes it difficult to grow a sufficiency of crops. There are people, at least on Kauai, that are working to restore the soil but 3 years ago it didn’t sound like any of the islands could be self sustaining should travel to and from the islands become restricted for what ever reasons.

I’m going back for 3 months this winter in part to reassess suitability of living there in case of collapse. I did not know about Peak Oil or the 3Es when I visited the first time. I just had a general interest in sustainability. But the people who are in tune with the islands understand their fragile predicament. I hurricane in the 1980s left them with out imports from the main land for enough time to cause some pain.

I’ll try to remember to share my assessments after some time there.

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