Gas cans — The NO good, the bad, and the ugly

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  • Sun, Mar 06, 2011 - 04:34am

    #11

    Brak

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    storage temperature for kerosene

Great info here, thanks!

Question — I’ve read that kerosene lasts indefinitely as long as temperature is stable. That seems quite difficult to do without a basement tank or a buried tank, yet I’ve seen folks post photos with tanks aboveground and outside. What do folks think about the relative importance of stable temperature? Is putting it under cover in a shady location reasonable enough, do you think?

Two related questions:

Kerosene is much better than diesel for long-term storage, right?

For my diesel tractor, are any additives recommended for fueling with kerosene?

Thanks guys.

  • Fri, Mar 11, 2011 - 05:33am

    #12

    Travlin

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    Best gas can for me

I finally found a store with the Blitz metal cans so I could exam them.  It is the same can I had before, except it doesn’t have the self storing flexible metal nozzle.  The screw off vent cap I mentioned in my original post was a flaw in my memory.  In the photo linked below, the cap under the handle is a metal cap for storage, with a standard O-ring seal that can be easily replaced.  It should prevent any gas or vapor from leaking even if the can is on its side.  This is a safe can.  I used to sleep on top of it and smoke three feet away from it, and I’m still here to tell the tale.*  The metal cap has a plastic ring added to the top with very sharp gear teeth that engage a plastic catch to make it child safe.  You need a glove or heavy rag to unscrew this without pain.  Fortunately, the plastic ring and catch can be easily removed.  The can is made of heavy gauge steel, with a one piece bottom and good welds.  The interior is treated for corrosion.  The fire engine red paint is thick enamel and provides excellent protection.  The large opening for pouring is a solid steel ring with machined threads to match the cap, and is welded in securely.  Blitz makes a top quality can that will last a long time.  I will discard the crappy plastic eco-weenie nozzle.  Available from Northern Gear for only $40, and from Sears for the same price, so you can buy locally and save a lot on shipping.  The third link has them for only $35 without the useless nozzle.

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200376069_200376069 

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_12605_SPA5772S674202801P

http://www.2kstore.com/plugins/MivaMerchants/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=PSIOS&Product_Code=B5G&Category_Code=

 

I ordered a flexible metal nozzle separately ( big thanks to Ao).  It has to be  stored externally, but will work with unleaded gas filler pipes.  Note the end cap to keep the interior clean.  It arrived today and fits perfectly.  It also has a fine mesh screen at the tip to filter the gas.

http://www.hqcompany.com/index.php?theme=7&chapter=102

 

I bought this funnel.  It is bell shaped, with a lip to hold gas without spilling, and will fit into an auto fill pipe.  Notice that both ends have a screw cap to keep the interior clean.  Be sure to get the 1.25 quart size.

http://www.amazon.com/Legacy-LEGCF328-GreatFunnel-1-25-Quart/dp/B003TSW2YM

 

Here is a siphon that looks good.  Notice the durable rubber squeeze bulb instead of a thin plastic bellows.  The hose clamps allow easy replacement of the two inch diameter tubing.  I’m sure an adapter can be found at an aquarium supply source to reduce to a ¾ inch tube for an auto filler pipe.  Did you know that many new cars have a device to block a hose to siphon gas out of the tank?

http://www.harborfreight.com/fluid-siphon-pump-93290.html

 

I bought this siphon.  It is very finicky to operate and will be returned.  Could be okay for a warm summer day, but not for emergency use.  It has a brass fitting with a spring loaded glass ball valve on one end.  You submerge this into the source liquid, plunge it up and down to pump liquid until the hose is full, and then it acts as a siphon.  It takes skill and experience to use this.  Your source container needs to allow at least four inches of vertical or horizontal movement to pump.  The hose must run straight downhill after the first hump over the edge of the source container.  It works best if the exit end of the hose is submerged and not just pouring out into air.

http://www.amazon.com/Hopkins-FloTool-10801-Shaker-Anti-Static/dp/B000EH0ORI

 

I studied the NATO cans online.  They are constructed with the left and right halves welded in the center all around the can.  This means the spout is offset to one side and has a small diameter base.  The clamping lid and nozzle design looks less secure to me than the machined threads of the Blitz and are more easily damaged, however, many people like them.  Good luck finding one.  Did you know that the term “jerry can” was coined by the British in World War II when they copied the the gas cans of the German army (the Jerries) to replace their own round ones that leaked and stored poorly?

Wedco used to make a copy of the NATO can, but now only offers an eco-weenie model with the crappy plastic nozzle and cap.  From photos they look like the Briggs and Stratton metal can that I personally inspected.  The B&S can is clearly inferior in construction compared to Blitz.  The threads to screw on the nozzle are just stamped into the metal spout base.  It has no secure cap to seal it, and it appeared less rugged with inferior paint.

The plastic cans linked by MarkM were a good alternative.  They would probably have served me well and cost considerably less, though I was concerned about how tightly the vent plug base was secured into the jug body.  I chose the Blitz metal can because of my good experience with them previously.  The round metal can suggestions also looked serviceable, but I wanted a compact shape for storage, and rugged construction for secure transportation.

My thanks to everyone for the excellent suggestions.  You provided workable choices.  I will link this thread to the List of Preparation Threads for reference.

Travlin

 

* Don’t try this at home.  I was young and immortal then.

  • Sun, Mar 13, 2011 - 03:36am

    #13
    MarkM

    MarkM

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    Travlin,Once you discard

Travlin,

Once you discard the plastic nozzle, is there a threaded metal cap to use as a seal?

  • Sun, Mar 13, 2011 - 04:09am

    #14

    Travlin

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    Metal cap

[quote=MarkM]

Once you discard the plastic nozzle, is there a threaded metal cap to use as a seal?

[/quote]

MarkM

Yes indeed there is.  This is the best feature of the Blitz can.  The cap is heavy steel with fine machined threads and an O ring that can be easily replaced.  It screws into a steel ring in the can.

This photo shows the metal cap stored under the handle.  This is how they are sold.

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200376069_200376069

This photo shows the metal cap screwed in place.  The price is an error.  These cans are listed elsewhere on the Amazon site for $50.  The bad reviews refer to the plastic nozzles.  I explained above where to get a metal one.  (Thanks again Ao.)

http://www.amazon.com/Blitz-11010-Gallon-Steel-Gas/dp/B00004X14D/ref=cm_lmf_tit_35_rsrssi0

This cap keeps the liquid gasoline and vapors inside, and the can is heavy gauge steel so it is very hard to puncture.  As long as the gas is contained you are safe from explosion.  It is important not to over fill the can.  A little below the opening is fine.  This allows for compression of vapors in the upper part of the can.  I’ve had it in the shade at 110 degrees Fahrenheit with no problem.  Direct sunlight in high heat might be pushing it, but probably okay.  You can lay a long screw driver across the cap and engage the lugs sticking up to get the cap very tight. 

Travlin 

  • Wed, Sep 14, 2011 - 02:18am

    #15
    ao

    ao

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    NATO gas cans

Cheaper Than Dirt has new NATO gas cans.  Very hard to find and they ain’t cheap but they’re rugged, reliable, and proven.

http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/ZBQ1412-1.html

… and spouts.

http://www.cheaperthandirt.com/ZBQ1413-1.html

  • Wed, Sep 14, 2011 - 02:46am

    #16

    Travlin

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    Update

Thanks for the tip Ao. That reminds me of an some updates.

The new Blitz cans use an O-ring to seal the steel storage cap. When the weather got warm the cans gave off gas vapor which is very bad in confined areas. A local surplus store had wide rubber gaskets for them like I remember from the old days. That ended the vapor leaks. I couldn’t find these gaskets online. I would have called Blitz to inquire if I hadn’t found them locally.

The funnel for pouring worked poorly and spilled gas on the ground. The siphon worked well if you are patient. I cut some narrow PVC pipe to length and notched one end to keep the siphon’s plastic tubing uncurled and reaching the bottom of the can. The metal nozzles worked very well once I realized that they should be screwed on loosely so they vent. Otherwise the flow rate was extremely slow.

Travlin 

  • Fri, Nov 02, 2012 - 04:27am

    #17

    Travlin

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    Update 2

Travlin wrote:

The new Blitz cans use an O-ring to seal the steel storage cap. When the weather got warm the cans gave off gas vapor which is very bad in confined areas. A local surplus store had wide rubber gaskets for them like I remember from the old days. That ended the vapor leaks. I couldn’t find these gaskets online. I would have called Blitz to inquire if I hadn’t found them locally.

Lo and behold, the gaskets I couldn’t find online are available as the fourth item down at this link.  Item two is the pouring spout I use. http://www.hqcompany.com/index.php?theme=7&chapter=102

Thanks again Ao.  This is the same link from your post 6.  I don’t know if the gaskets are a new item, or if I just overlooked them in the past.  If you buy the Blitz cans you really need these gaskets to prevent gas fumes in warm weather.  In confined spaces the fumes are very dangerous.

Travlin 

  • Fri, Nov 02, 2012 - 11:40am

    #18
    Petey1

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    Gas cans

Thanks for the links and info. Used ao’s post for cheaper than dirt. Best price on cans and shipping combined. Cheap plastic tanks just won’t seal well.

  • Tue, Nov 06, 2012 - 03:18am

    #19
    Jeff0100

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    Gas Cans

I would like to say thanks to everyone who contributed to this thread.  I have been going crazy trying to find a decent gas can that doesn’t leak while being transported, and can be poured without an extraordinary amount of effort. I find it truly amazing that these two requirements are so incredibly hard to satisfy with what is being offered through the primary retail channels today.  While I appreciate the intent of those who have worked to put in place regulations to mandate that certain spout technology be required to reduce emissions/gas vapors, thereby benefiting the environment, the spouts that are being produced and the overall cheapness of the end products being produced, serve only to negate those efforts- when frustrated consumers resort to tossing the crappy enviro spout to the side and simply pouring from the container opening into a funnel. If the major retailers would stop putting such pressure on manufacturers to make things cheap, perhaps a serviceable gas can could be found without having to spend hours digging through the internet.  Anyway, thanks to all for your contributions, with your advice- I have finally found what I was looking for.

  • Tue, Nov 06, 2012 - 06:13am

    #20

    Travlin

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    Welcome

Jeff0100

Welcome to the forums.  There are a lot of other threads with solid information.  The search box in the upper right corner helps find them.

Travlin 

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