Investing in Precious Metals 101 ad

Food Storage, Lessons Learned and Recommendations

Login or register to post comments Last Post 49818 reads   171 posts
Viewing 10 posts - 161 through 170 (of 171 total)
  • Wed, Apr 07, 2010 - 07:37pm

    #161
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1612

    count placeholder

    Re: Food Storage, Lessons Learned and Recommendations

  So frustrated !!! Where is the video of the gal  who showed how she had all her year or two  worth of storage set up in storeroom in the basement ??

 FM

  • Fri, Apr 09, 2010 - 08:37pm

    #162
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1612

    count placeholder

    Re: Food Storage, Lessons Learned and Recommendations

So frustrated !!! Where is the video of the gal  who showed how she had all her year or two  worth of storage set up in storeroom in the basement ??

 FM

Hi FM.

I don’t know if this is exactly what you’re looking for, but check pages 1 and 2 at this thread:

https://www.peakprosperity.com/forum/successful-food-storage-day-9-familes-4-tons-5-hours-lessons-learned-recommendations/27519

?

-Brandon

  • Sat, Apr 10, 2010 - 08:43pm

    #163
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1612

    count placeholder

    Re: Food Storage, Lessons Learned and Recommendations

Hey all!  Taking a break from clearing trail in the great white wilderness (yes, there is still snow on the ground up here!), so I decided to stop in and see how everyone is doing here on CM.

Here’s my lessons learned after mostly living on stored foods for several months now without conventional refrigeration or freezers (ok, the entire world was my freezer until a month ago, but I digress).

If you are actually going to live on the food you’re storing, and not just saving it for “a rainy day”, I highly recommend making variety buckets. Let me repeat that – I HIGHLY recommend making variety buckets. No one besides a small army can possibly eat 25# of dried beans quickly without doing permanent damage to their innards LOL.

Making variety buckets does require some additional planning and truly understanding the way your family eats, but it will save you lots of headache and (possible) wasted food in the long run. You have to know how much bread your family eats in a week/month and then figure out how many lbs of grain you need to grind down into enough flour to make the recipe, and how much of all the other dry ingredients you need to make that recipe. Same thing with other dried foods… especially dried foods that increase in volume significantly once reconstituted, otherwise you end up wasting something because it goes bad before you can eat it. Usually you end up making too much and chucking the fuzzy leftovers; we had that problem with the dried veggies for stew – 1/2 cup dried does NOT equal 1/2 reconstituted (good thing the dog likes veggies and didn’t mind the leftovers had started to smell a bit off).

It’s also a lot easier to do a little meal planning ahead of time as you’re building your buckets, rather than standing in your pantry after a hard day’s work surviving trying to figure out what to make and realizing that everything needs 2-3 hours of prep time to rehydrate, etc.  I started making bags (1 gallon zippers) that contained smaller bags with a whole recipe – like for the bread, a bag of grains to grind + yeast + shortening powder + salt, etc.  Some of the ingredients can be mixed together in a single bag, but others need to be kept separate to add at different times in the process. I printed off and laminated the recipe and prep/cooking instructions, and labeled all the smaller bags with ingredient and amount, so it’s really easy for me to refill them again and repackage the recipe in next year’s buckets. I started making “instant” mixes like this for biscuits, pancakes, muffins, stews, soups, casseroles, even pasta sauce.  For example, our pasta bag includes tomato powder (vac-packed with it’s own dessicant), dried tomato chunks, dried onion and garlic minces, a bag of spices, a bag of dried grated parmesan (vac-packed with it’s own 02 absorber), and enough dried pasta for 4 servings (two meals for two).

There are things that we use “ad hoc” – like sugar, salt, coffee, dry milk, powdered eggs, spices etc. And those we just package into reasonable sizes for our normal consumption rate.

Packaged like this, we manage to get a month’s worth into about 2 buckets — a large variety of dinners in one and a vareity of breakfasts & lunches in another with the adhoc things thrown in on top. We also have a few “bulk” buckets that contain small bags of regular use items like sugar in case we didn’t pack enough in our monthly buckets. Most of the smaller bags are regular zipper bags of varying sizes that I squeezed the air out of… leaving a tiny corner open for either vac-packing or so the O2 absorber & dessicant can work on it. Anything that’s a fine powder (like tomato, eggs, milk) get’s vac-packed with it’s own dessicant, while course granulated stuff like sugar and salt just gets vac-packed against the humidity. Some stuff, like the parmesan, I vac-pack with it’s own *small* O2 absorber. We don’t put dessicant in our big mylar bags, just in the individual foods that need it since we don’t live in a high humidity area; but we do layer O2 abosrbers in the mylar – one in the bottom, middle and top.

And definitely invest in Gamma lids for your buckets! Especially if you live somewhere really cold — those damned snap on lids will NOT come off when they’re frozen and you end up destroying the lid, bucket or bucket wrench!  We also avoid opening a bucket/bag that we aren’t going to eat all of soon… resealing is a major hassle when you don’t have power, even with our handy little battery-operated sealer. Frozen mylar also cuts the living crap out of you — like cut tin — so you have to be careful.

As for canned stuff — you can ignore the “best buy” dates with impunity. Yes, the nutritional value and texture has started to degrade, but it’s not going bad, so just eat it when you can… i.e. before any of the new stuff whether you want it or not.

The nutritional loss of foods during freezing, canning and drying all vary with the type of food it is. There are some things that lose just as much being dried as being canned, etc.  There are lots of books, usually the “country folk” types, that go into great detail about which storage method is best for which foods. Also, there are some forms that will not do what you want in the form that you have them, or at least not well. For instance, making muffins with dried blueberries did not have the best end result, canned blueberries worked much better. Canned cheddar cheese is way better than the cheese powder – but if you want to make a sauce or dip, use the powder because canned (or frozen) cheese doesn’t melt too well. Milk is another one that gets tricky – powdered milk works ok in some recipes if you have enough time to reconsitute it properly, but canned evap works better a lot of the time. Also relying solely on dried foods has a major drawback — you need fresh water, which you might not always have.

So, we have a shed full of dried food buckets, a pantry full of canned foods and air-tight daily-use storage containers, and (during the winter) a shed full of frozen meat, veg, fruit & dairy. We keep the canned stuff inside all the time, regardless of the space, since jars can break when they freeze and freeze-thaw in a jar or can will eventually turn the contents into disgusting mush (edible, but nasty).

  • Sun, Apr 11, 2010 - 02:16am

    #164
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1612

    count placeholder

    Re: Food Storage, Lessons Learned and Recommendations

Thanks PlicketyCat!!!!! Stay safe up there this spring.

  • Mon, Jun 17, 2013 - 11:51am

    #165

    Nervous Nelly

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Nov 24 2011

    Posts: 179

    count placeholder

    A little late but this is a good web site.

http://www.sproutpeople.com/

NN

  • Mon, Jun 17, 2013 - 12:11pm

    #166
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1612

    count placeholder

    Sproutpeople are terrific

NN

I have bought my day to day sprout seeds from them for years.  They have just about every seed imaginable for sprouting and very clear directions and recipes on their website.  Plus any materials you may need for specialty items like microgreens or sunflower seed sprouting. Their starter kits are worthwhile for someone who wants to try their hand at sprouting a lot of different things but may not be sure they will like it.

They claim that the alfalfa contamination issues only occur with the "non-organic" seeds and that there is no record of problems with organic alfalfa. Presumably due to different farming methods.

Of course they sell organic but they seem on the level.  For bulk cans of sprouting seeds Handy Pantry

Handy Pantry Products

is good for number 10 cans of mung beans, etc….  I now keep a few cans of mung and fenugreek and alfalfa on hand. Fenugreek sprouts are easy but cannot be eaten by pregnant women due to risk of contractions.  It sprouts to a full sized bean in about 3 days and is cheap to obtain at some spice stores. It is bitter but if you like that it attains full size several days earlier than mung bean.   I have eaten it in moderation with no difficulty.  The ground seeds are much more potent and may lower blood sugar.

Regards

D

 

  • Sat, Aug 02, 2014 - 08:02pm

    #167

    Norbert Kerr

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 16 2014

    Posts: 3

    count placeholder

    On the “Food Storage, Lessons

On the "Food Storage, Lessons Learned and Recommendations" thead, cat233 noted "Figure out what your base unit of issue is going to be.  Chris and Becca had a great arrangement – their unit of issue was 1 bucket of wheat (36 pounds), 1 bucket of beans (36 pounds), 1 bucket of rice (38 pounds), and one bucket of oats (22 pounds).  This is enough for a 3 month supply for an adult."

The thread had lots of useful information about how to obtain and store these basic foodstuffs. What I haven't been able to find, though, is information about how one would prepare these foods, particularly under emergency conditions (e.g., no electricity, no gas). What utensils are needed, what cooking equipment, recipes, etc. ? Can folks recommend resources?

Thanks!

 

  • Sat, Aug 02, 2014 - 11:37pm

    #168

    Wendy S. Delmater

    Status Diamond Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 13 2009

    Posts: 1418

    count placeholder

    examples

I will take a stab at answering your question,

For short-term outages you might try cooking on a barbecue grill, burning not only charcoal but wood, either on the grill itself or with cast iron pans that can take the heat. In the longer term, in the summer and in warmer climates, a solar oven works, albeit slowly. If you heat with wood in the winter you can cook on or in a woodstove: again, think cast iron.

We like wheat berries (cook the wheat grain like oatmeal) with maple syrup, fruit, or brown sugar. Just add water, and simmer. You can also throw a handful into soups instead of pasta. Rice goes well in soups, too.

The beans you can soak overnight and cook for a shorter period the next day (important if fuel is scarce) – or cook for a longer time right away, until tender. Mash them to make refried beans, or add things from your garden to make chili. Either way, they are good with rice.

Oat groats are a pain in my opinion. We buy rolled outs, cook as usual.

Last but not least, you can make bread if you have a grinder to make flour, and yeast or–much easier–baking soda for soda breads. A little oil, a little sugar or honey, a pinch of salt, and ground wheat flour with water and you have bread dough. Add whatever herbs or spices you're growing (we like thyme and onion), or sweeten it to a cake-like taste (Irish soda bread, for example.)  Bread scan even be baked in cast iron pans on the grill.

  • Thu, Apr 07, 2016 - 08:34am

    #169
    Ggray

    Ggray

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 04 2016

    Posts: 3

    count placeholder

    Dog food

Thanks for sharing the recipe, my pet dog absolutely loved it, unfortunately I didnt take pictures. I could tell the happiness of my dog after watching his face. I saw another website that shared some homemade dog food recipes for sensitive stomach. However I am unsure should i try them, i just needed an advice from you.

Can you please review the recipes? Are they worth trying?

Article : Best Dog Food For Sensitive Stomach 

So please suggest me best food then i will buy.

Thanks

  • Mon, Apr 25, 2016 - 06:07pm

    #170
    Danny Cooper

    Danny Cooper

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jul 30 2011

    Posts: 4

    count placeholder

    Storing Metal LDS Food Cans in Extreme Cold

I purchased a bunch of the #10 metal cans from the local LDS food store and I am storing all of it (rice, beans, wheat) in a heavily insulated, professionally built shed. An A/C unit keeps the temperature under 68 during the warmer months, but otherwise, the shed does not have heating or air flow. I am in the mountains of the mid-Atlantic and it does get humid.

Do these conditions seem good enough to keep the food preserved long term? Is it possible for condensation to form inside of the metal cans? I'd appreciate any thoughts anyone has.

Also – I've read conflicting commentary on whether or not mylar bags and plastic buckets can keep food preserved for more than 3 or 4 years. I want my food to be good for at least 20 years, if possible, so is using metal the best way to go?

Viewing 10 posts - 161 through 170 (of 171 total)

Login or Register to post comments