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Fish in a Barrel: Las Vegas shooter

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  • Tue, Oct 03, 2017 - 03:17pm

    #11
    Doug

    Doug

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    oops dup

duplicate

  • Tue, Oct 03, 2017 - 03:38pm

    #12
    Time2help

    Time2help

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    Stinks to high heaven

Just read through the "early facts" from the Daily Mail article…nice narrative for pushing a pre-packaged agenda.

Calling bullshit on this one…add it to the list.

Welcome to the Occupied States of America.

  • Tue, Oct 03, 2017 - 04:34pm

    #13

    Wendy S. Delmater

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    For you conspiracy theorists…

I don't know how many of you follow the Dilbert cartoonist Scott Adams, but he does some rather interesting Periscopes. 

Scott Adams Periscope: LV shooter thought experiment

This one is about 40 minutes long, and to get the whole impact you really need to listen to/watch the whole thing. He brings up some points to ponder. 

And he was immediately attacked afterward. Hm. 

  • Tue, Oct 03, 2017 - 04:50pm

    #14
    Time2help

    Time2help

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    Police Scanner Audio

Listen.

  • Tue, Oct 03, 2017 - 05:01pm

    #15

    sand_puppy

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    Strategy of Tension

I do not know if the LV mass shooting event comes from the proverbial "lone deranged gunman" or will eventually come to be regarded as an element of the "Strategy of Tension."   I believe that it is good to know about this strategy so that we can see it when it shows up before our eyes.

Daniele Ganser, a Swiss historian on faculty at University of Basil, first wrote about it in his book NATOs Secret Armies:  Operation GLADIO and Terrorism in Western Europe.

He wrote an abbreviated paper on this topic that is published in the Journal of 9/11 Studies.

I'll summarize by extracting his main points and interjecting comments in brackets.

The “Strategy of Tension” in the Cold War Period*

In this essay, I will not deal directly with 9/11 but will look at what we can learn from history. I will report on some of the newest academic data about secret warfare during the Cold War. A secret military strategy that targets domestic populations with terrorism does indeed exist. It is called the “strategy of tension.” And it was implemented by Western democracies.  

[SP–as stated in the last paragraph below, the ultimate goal of the strategy was to cause the frightened population to turn to the state for security–i.e.–it is a strategy for growing the police/surveillance/control systems.  Disarming the population, hyper-arming the police, and conducting global citizen surveillance "for your protection."]

In its essence, the strategy of tension targets the emotions of human beings and aims to spread maximum fear among the target group.Tension” refers to emotional distress and psychological fear, whereas “strategy” refers to the technique of bringing about such distress and fear. A terrorist attack in a public place, such as a railway station, a market place, or a school bus, is the typical technique through which the strategy of tension is implemented. After the attack—and this is a crucial element—the secret agents who carried out the crime blame it on a political opponent by removing and planting evidence.

It must be noted that the targets of the strategy of tension are not the dead and the wounded … but the millions of people who survive physically unharmed but emotionally distressed. [SP–DaveF has described this as "killing the chicken to scare the monkey."  And "All terrorism is theater."]

The strategy of tension forms part of what is called “psychological warfare” or PSYWAR. As the term indicates, this form of warfare does not attack human bodies ,,,[but] our human ability to think and feel. If a group can get access to our thinking and our feeling without our noticing, it can exercise great power over us. Once we notice that our psyches are being manipulated through psychological warfare, the technique loses some of its effect.  [SP–and this is why I write about it!  Understanding the mechanism renders it much less powerful.] …

I will now give some historical examples of strategy-of-tension terrorism. Arguably the best historical data available today on the strategy of tension come from Italy, where judges, parliamentarians, and academics together continue to make great efforts to understand and describe this secret strategy.

Judge Casson and the Peteano Terror

Italian Judge Felice Casson rediscovered the strategy during his investigation into a number of terrorist attacks Italy had suffered in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. According to Casson, the best documented historical case in which the strategy of tension was implemented occurred in the Italian village of Peteano. There, on May 31, 1972, three members of the Italian paramilitary police, the Carabinieri, were lured to an abandoned Fiat 500 by an anonymous phone call and were killed when they opened the hood of the car, thereby triggering a bomb. For many years, this terrorist attack was blamed on the Red Brigades, a left-wing terror organization in Italy. But after Casson reopened the case, he found that the Catholic neofascist Vincenzo Vinciguerra, a militant anti-communist, had carried out the crime.

Casson also found to his great surprise that Vinciguerra had not operated alone, but had been protected by members of the Italian military intelligence service. … Judge Casson arrested Vinciguerra, who on trial in 1984 confirmed that it had been relatively easy for him to escape and hide because large segments of the Italian security apparatus, including the SISMI, had shared his anti-communist convictions and had, therefore, silently supported crimes that discredited the Italian left and especially the Communist Party, which was quite strong. After the bombing, Vinciguerra recalled, “A whole mechanism came into action…. [T]he Carabinieri, the Minister of the Interior, the customs services, and the military and civilian intelligence services accepted the ideological reasoning behind the attack.

Casson found that by this crime and other attacks being blamed on the leftwing Red Brigades, the primary political enemy, the Italian Communist Party, was discredited. The directors of the military intelligence service and politicians argued after the crime that the “Communist danger” justified increased military spending and a reduction of civil liberties in the interest of state security. In this way, the strategy of tension, as executed through the Peteano terror, spread fear across Italy, discredited a political opponent, and allowed for the implementation of conservative security policies. It was very effective, for nobody knew at the time that the intelligence services had themselves supported the crime.

… Peteano was not an isolated tragedy in Italy, but part of a long series of terrorist attacks that had started in 1969. On December 12 of that year, four bombs exploded in public places in Rome and Milan, killing 16 and maiming and wounding 80 innocent civilians, with most of the deaths and injuries occurring in Milan’s Piazza Fontana. After the massacre, according to the rules of the strategy of tension, the Italian military intelligence service SID planted bomb parts in the villa of well-known leftist editor Giangiacomo Feltrinelli in order to blame the terror on the Communists and other members of the extreme left.  Only years later was it revealed that Feltrinelli had absolutely nothing at all to do with the crime and that, in reality, the Italian extreme right, including Ordine Nuovo, had carried out the atrocity in order to promote the strategy of tension.

Major attacks came in 1974, a couple years after the Peteano tragedy. On May 28, a bomb exploded at an anti-fascist rally for which 3,000 had gathered in the Italian city of Brescia, killing 8 and injuring and maiming 102 people.   Neofascist Vincenzo Vinciguerra explained after his arrest:

“You had to attack civilians, the people, women, children, innocent people, unknown people far removed from any political game.”  … The reason was quite simple [he continued]. They were supposed to force these people, the Italian public, to turn to the State to ask for greater security. This is the political logic that lies behind all the massacres and the bombings which remain unpunished, because the State cannot convict itself or declare itself responsible for what happened.

 

  • Tue, Oct 03, 2017 - 05:20pm

    #16
    Time2help

    Time2help

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    Re: Strategy of Tension

  • Tue, Oct 03, 2017 - 05:25pm

    #17
    Time2help

    Time2help

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    Re: M240B

[quote=Rector]Sure sounds like it.  Of course someone would have to have pulled the tracers out of the belt.  If true, it will not be possible to hide the 7.62 bullet holes all over the place.  The caliber will come out and I'm going to guess 7.62X39.[/quote]

7.62X51 NATO (308 US)

 

  • Tue, Oct 03, 2017 - 05:36pm

    #18

    Rector

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    I know what caliber a 240 is. . .

I was guessing he was using an AK or AKM variant b/c the rate of fire sounded slower than normal (assuming it's not a 240).  Now it appears it was a bump stock which would explain the low cyclic rate.

  • Tue, Oct 03, 2017 - 05:53pm

    #19
    robie robinson

    robie robinson

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    Paddock

Wonder what meds he has/was on?

  • Tue, Oct 03, 2017 - 05:53pm

    #20

    Rector

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    Such stupid sh*t. . .

The labyrinth of legal definitions on what constitutes "full auto" a "firearm" or a "short barrelled rifle" have created a cottage industry of legal (in word only) substitutes for firearm features otherwise outlawed.  The "arm brace" comes to mind with regard to SBRs (short barrelled rifles).  Easy targets for legislation because they only exist by virtue of ATF letter declaring them to be "legal".  

It has always been my opinion that these devices serve only to infuriate the anti gun crowd and contribute little to the firearms world.  Bump fire stocks are stupid toys to most people who own them and "bump fire" has been around long before the stocks were invented or deemed legal by ATF.  I would say the SlideFire company is in for some dark days.

Rector

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