Anyone else grow up in a back-to-the-land commune?

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  • Thu, Sep 10, 2020 - 10:37pm

    #1
    Tracy A

    Tracy A

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    Anyone else grow up in a back-to-the-land commune?

I am curious if anyone else here grew up on a commune, and if so, how the experience helped you on your journey toward resilience?

I grew up in a Christian back-to-the-land commune, and feel like an immigrant in America even though I grew up in New York State. Even after 15 years in “the real world,” I find that I have a very different set of skills, habits, and priorities than most Americans, and the mission of Peak Prosperity speaks to me. I am curious if anyone else here comes from a similar background.

 

  • Sat, Sep 12, 2020 - 02:14am

    #2
    smaturin

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    Anyone else grow up in a back-to-the-land commune?

Tracy:  I spent some formative years as a young adult on a back to the land commune. I learned we don’t really need as much in material things as my middle class family background would have had me think. I was fine with no electricity or running water, built my own house, sewed my own clothes. We created our own cuisine based on the garden, the milk cows and the bulk food coop in town. Culture is what matters and we made a lot of our own which meant everything.

I wonder what skills and priorities did you bring from your experience? Do you have enhanced social skills, or more practical knowledge?

  • Sun, Sep 13, 2020 - 09:47pm

    #3
    Tracy A

    Tracy A

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    Anyone else grow up in a back-to-the-land commune?

thanks for your response!  I feel like the biggest advantage I had was a childhood filled with play AND work in which I gained numerous skills largely absent today  – farming, campcrafts, spinning, knitting and weaving, sewing clothes by machine and by hand, first aid, orienteering, cooking, canning and preserving, animal care, and basically a strong work ethic.

 

The social skills are harder to quantify but in many ways are stronger. I learned to seek out mentors, to cultivate friendships across generations, and to foster deep neighborhood ties. All of these have stood me in good stead.

 

Finally, the freedom from consumerist thinking. It’s amazing what can be accomplished when one steps out of the rat tace.

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