Covid-19 medication

Login or register to post comments Last Post 0 reads   12 posts
Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 12 total)
  • Tue, Feb 18, 2020 - 05:51am

    #1
    westcoastdog

    westcoastdog

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2020

    Posts: 57

    count placeholder

    Covid-19 medication

When I was in Vietnam, I took chloroquine phosphate weekly for malaria because it was the only medication available. Unfortunately, malaria evolved resistance in most parts of the world. Assuming it works, the good news is there should large supplies and the medication is inexpensive compared to the other medications being tested. Also, minimal side effects.

https://www.newtimes.co.rw/news/chloroquine-antimalarial-drug-confirmed-effective-coronavirus

The science:

https://aac.asm.org/content/53/8/3416

Since chloroquine was known to be effective against SARS 15 years ago, one wonders why it wasn’t used immediately.

 

Chloroquine (if I understand this correctly) would be targeted at the viral infection.  Given that there is often co/secondary opportunistic infection that greatly elevates the seriousness of the disease, what is the best recommended antibiotic for this situation.  I’m speaking of the scenario of home treatment since the hospital system may be overloaded and unable to help.  The antibiotic would have to be oral and non intravenous.

  • Tue, Feb 18, 2020 - 07:33am

    #3

    sand_puppy

    Status Platinum Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 13 2011

    Posts: 2161

    count placeholder

    Antibiotics for bacterial secondary pneumonias

This is a very good question, about the medicines.

Bacterial pneumonia commonly follows or is concurrent with a viral pneumonia.

With the Spanish flu of 1918, post-mortem exam of the majority of fatal cases had a bacterial pneumonia.  Seasonal flu that is fatal typically has 30% secondary bacterial pneumonia. (Source)

The most prominent bacteria that causes pneumonia is Streptococcus pneumoniae. Other important pneumonia-causing bacteria are Staphylococcus aureusHaemophilus influenzae, and Streptococcus pyogenes.  These are the normal pulmonary pathogens.    “Individuals infected with influenza virus are most susceptible to secondary bacterial pneumonia between 4 and 14 days after the onset of influenza symptoms. (Source)

I would love to hear the internists chime in on this topic.  But I would get

Ceftin 500 mg twice daily for 10-14 days, and,

Doxycycline 100 mg Twice daily for 10-14 days.

 

  • Tue, Feb 18, 2020 - 07:37am   (Reply to #3)

    #4
    westcoastdog

    westcoastdog

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2020

    Posts: 57

    count placeholder2+

    re: Antibiotics for bacterial secondary pneumonias

Don’t forget there are two vaccines for pneumonia. If you are a senior, you should get injected immediately.

Yes, I’ve already gotten a prescription for doxycycline, and will research Ceftin as well as any other recommendations.  My concern (and it may be small) is that some variants of staph infections are methicillin resistant and would not be effective.  Diagnosing on my own with myself as the patient in an extreme situation would suggest finding the best viable antibiotic to have in my possession before a drug shortage hits.  I also looked at the flow chart Chris posted earlier today and in his blog yesterday and will look up the drugs suggested by the Chinese doctors that they have been using.  Thanks!

  • Tue, Feb 18, 2020 - 09:41am

    #6

    dtrammel

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: May 03 2011

    Posts: 698

    count placeholder

    Over the Counter Medicines

I retired last October here in the US but I’m not yet old enough to get Medicare, so I’m pretty much stuck with over the counter solutions.

First, you say there is are two vaccines for pneumonia? Is that something I could just walk into a Urgent Care and ask for, or could I get it from a local pharmacy?

I’m assuming doxycycline is an antibiotic? Does that then require a prescription from a doctor?

What about substitution with a fish antibiotic?

 

  • Tue, Feb 18, 2020 - 03:10pm   (Reply to #6)

    #7
    MQ

    MQ

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 13 2011

    Posts: 66

    count placeholder

    re: Over the Counter Medicines

Prices for the pneumonia vaccine, without insurance, seem to vary from $90 to $240. There are two vaccines which should be given at least a year apart. They are free to those on Medicare, probably because it is way cheaper to vaccinate than to pay for hospitalization. These are for Bacterial pneumonia, not viral, but bacterial seems to be common after a viral lung infection.

  • Wed, Feb 19, 2020 - 04:33am   (Reply to #2)

    #8
    Ulrik Rasmussen

    Ulrik Rasmussen

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Jan 24 2020

    Posts: 0

    count placeholder

    re: Best antibiotics for secondary infection

Now we have months to come up with preventative countermeassures, that are not antibiotics, but even something much simpler.

 

1. IV drop with hydrogen peroxide can make you survive cytokine storm, add small drop of collodial silver in drop, then you can cure yourself

2. Ketogenic diet removes glucose from your blood. Without glucose not growth of virus.

It’s pretty simple, and pretty cheap, and you get fitter, leaner and better looking.

Can you read about this in a magazine or newspaper. No, but if we study how body works, and look for options that does not need medicine from pharma companies.

You saw it first here!

  • Wed, Feb 19, 2020 - 05:52am

    #9
    westcoastdog

    westcoastdog

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 04 2020

    Posts: 57

    count placeholder

    Body makes it own glucose

When you’re not eating – especially overnight or between meals, the body has to make its own sugar. The liver supplies sugar or glucose by turning glycogen into glucose in a process called glycogenolysis.

Has there been any studies that ingesting hydrogen peroxide kills viruses? No, there isn’t because the chemical never enters the bloodstream. You can sanitize your skin with it, but alcohol is better.

Another example of fake science on this website.

  • Sun, Feb 23, 2020 - 10:40pm

    #10
    Amie

    Amie

    Status Member (Offline)

    Joined: Feb 24 2020

    Posts: 0

    count placeholder

    Quinine as alternative to Chloroquine

So Chloroquine is a synthetic version of quinine, which is readily available over the counter. I have briefly scanned some articles that say it is as efficacious as chloroquine in treating Malaria. Does anyone have knowledge or an opinion about whether this would be good to have on hand for home treatment?  I am particularly susceptible to pnemonia as I have asthma, so I got the first pnemonia vaccine last week. If you have asthma, are a smoker, or have a few other conditions, it is approved for you to get under age 65. The cash price at my GP was $130 for reference. I had bacterial pneumonia in December following what I suspect was the flu and it was treated with Doxycycline, which coincidentally is also an anti-malarial. I refilled that to have on hand too with all my asthma meds/inhalers/breathing treatments. I must say, I’m pretty nervous about this one as I have 3 kids and they bring home every bug out there.

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 12 total)

Login or Register to post comments