Costa Rica and Bitcoin

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  • Tue, Feb 23, 2021 - 11:57am

    #1
    Mohammed Mast

    Mohammed Mast

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    Costa Rica and Bitcoin

this is an adjunct to my response to drreinmund on the rabbit hole thread

i absolutely love costa rica. it is absolutely stunning. it is the most stable place in latin america. 28% of the land is preserved. most of the electricity is hydro. they don’t have an army. great health care and they like bitcoin.

as the nomad capitalist says ” go where you are treated best”

https://cryptopotato.com/costa-rica-a-new-crypto-heaven/

  • Tue, Feb 23, 2021 - 12:15pm

    #2
    dreinmund

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    Costa Rica and Bitcoin

Hi Mohammed,

I visited Cost Rica, great country, great people, many of them highly educated. It’s probably not a bad choice for some that are flexible enough to leave the US (or other Western countries) behind.

Perhaps there is a future where crypto is encouraged and allowed in some countries, but resisted, highly taxed and frowned upon in other countries.

It remains to be seen if in a fragmented world like that, crypto can grow to be as big as if everybody embraced it equally.

  • Tue, Feb 23, 2021 - 01:01pm

    #3
    ao

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    lots of ex-CIA in Costa Rica

Visited there and it was nice but was not as wonderful as I expected. When you see lots of metal gates on housing compounds and bars on windows, it’s not a good sign. We never encountered any problems there but speaking to locals, the gates were there for a reason. Real estate there was cheap a couple of decades ago but became increasingly expensive as more American expats moved there, a lot with alphabet agency connections. My son visited there for a short period of time and then lived there for about half a year. When I was looking for a possible refuge from the US, I asked him where he would prefer living, Costa Rica or the US, since he had more experience with the country, having lived in both urban and rural areas. He, without hesitation, said the US. That was my impression too. Nice country to visit with some interesting attributes but I still prefer the US.

As far as the greatest stability in Latin America, Panama has become quite stable and the “Switzerland” of the New World with the removal of Noriega and the development of banking there. There’s even a Trump tower there with a unique sail like architecture. I wonder how that is faring with what happened with his administration. There’s still strong American influence, even with the US giving up control of the canal. And the steady revenue from the canal undoubtedly contributes to its stability.

Uruguay may be even more stable. Uruguay does not have the ecosystem/geographic diversity of Costa Rica but seems to be a place that is hands off to the powers of the world. The Nazis didn’t mess with it and the US hasn’t messed with it either. The harbor in Montevideo is littered with a number of burned, half sunken ships. They are North Korean fishing vessels which had unfortunate “accidents” and just happened to burn in the harbor, leaving their heavily damaged vessels there and their crews “stranded”, never to return home. Interesting that word would get back to even North Korea about Uruguay as a safe haven.

Supposedly, the planning for the government in Uruguay came from a small group of Freemasons (not dissimilar to the US). In fact, there is a building at one end of the Plaza Independecia in Montevideo with very unique architecture, the Palacio Salvo, which was supposedly designed with input by these masons. One does wonder how, in the hurricane that is South and Central American politics, these countries have remained eyes in the storms.

  • Tue, Feb 23, 2021 - 03:17pm   (Reply to #3)

    #4
    Mohammed Mast

    Mohammed Mast

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    Costa Rica and Bitcoin

i have a very good friend from argentina who said when i asked him the best place in s america he said w/o hesitation uruguay.

my point being “you go where they treat you best” when the us treats me like shit i leave. eric schmidt is buying a passport from cyprus .  peter thiel bought one from new zealand. portugal is at the  top of my list as is india and se asia.

costa rica is crypto friendly,  hcq friendly, ivermectin friendly and close to family.

 

  • Tue, Feb 23, 2021 - 04:29pm

    #5
    dreinmund

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    Reply To: Costa Rica and Bitcoin

Ha, LOL, if you’re stuck in Argentina, most places in South America are an upgrade 🙂

I visited Panama City last year for two days. Nice place, but not cheap. “Switzerland” nails it, because of its fairly high cost of living (comparatively).

  • Tue, Feb 23, 2021 - 05:10pm

    #6
    2retired

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    Costa Rica and Bitcoin

Things seen from afar often can look pretty good, up close the warts may show. A college sunk a chunk of change buying, then building his dream (in Costa Rica), got cleaned out twice when away and then walked away from it all. Closer to home, one of my aunt’s husbands took her down on a trip meant to repatriate an ‘investment property’ and came back empty handed (carribean island). I have heard similiar stories regarding land tenure tribulations in Mexico.

  • Tue, Feb 23, 2021 - 08:19pm   (Reply to #3)

    #7
    ao

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    Eric Schmidt and Cyprus

It surprises me that Eric Schmidt trusts Cyprus. They weren’t treating their bank depositors too well back in the Great Financial Crisis including some Russian oligarchs. That is, until Putin had two Russian warships sail into their waters to send a very clear message. Suddenly, the rules changed for the Russian oligarchs to their benefit. It always seems to come down to things that go bang in the end.

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