Coronavirus in Elevators – Looking for an advise

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  • Thu, Mar 12, 2020 - 02:20am

    #1
    Janez

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    Coronavirus in Elevators – Looking for an advise

Looking for an advise about how to maintain a high rise elevator in a Coronavirus situation.

Here is Dr.Campbell’s presentation of  a bus infection study from China that puts infection zone within 4.5m of the infected and 30min after the infected left.

(Wouldn’t then the whole bus got sick ?  Why only two passengers (in case the bus wasn’t empty) ?

That would mean that using elevators or even climbing the stairs is extremely risky if there was an infected person there earlier ?

I am sure there are plenty high rises with elevators around Wuhan.

Any high rise clusters data available ?

Wouldn’t that make a rush hour in a busy office tower a killing field ?

  • Thu, Mar 12, 2020 - 10:08am

    #2
    yaz

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    Coronavirus in Elevators – Looking for an advise

The concern over elevators made me start using the stairs at work (thankfully, only 7 floors), but yes, too close for comfort during a situation like this.

  • Thu, Mar 12, 2020 - 06:56pm

    #3
    JtheRed

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    Coronavirus in Elevators – Looking for an advise

Hi this was a post by an infectious diseases nurse that I found in a comment section.

1.       I don’t use the elevator. We call it the disease box. Mask up if you must use on. Use your elbow to push the buttons. Then wash your hands.

2.       If a door has a handicap button, I use my elbow to push it. If not, I use my sleeve to turn the handle. Then I wash my hands.

3.       When I wash my hands, I do everything with my elbow. Turn the water off with a paper towel. I open the door with a paper towel.

4.       I do not shake hands. Elbow bump.

5.       I keep an N95 mask in each pocket. When in doubt, I whip it out.

6.       I don’t touch my food with my hands, ever. I hold burgers and sandwiches by the wrapper or in a napkin.

7.       I don’t touch my eyes, nose or mouth.

8.       I was my hands before going to my car to go home.

9.       I strip down as soon as I get home. I keep a work clothes hamper in our mud room.

10.    I take a shower. All this may or may not help in a full blown pandemic but I sleep well knowing that I’ve done what I can to protect my family.

  • Thu, Mar 12, 2020 - 07:04pm

    #4
    JtheRed

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    Coronavirus in Elevators – Looking for an advise

This is advice from Ms. Elisabeth Rosenthal, a journalist and physician, is a contributing opinion writer in the New York Times.  She covered the SARS outbreak in China.

Here are my main takeaways from that experience for ordinary people on the ground:

1. Wash your hands frequently.

2. Don’t go to the office when you are sick. Don’t send your kids to school or day care when they are ill, either.

Notice I didn’t say anything about masks. Having a mask with you as a precaution makes sense if you are in the midst of an outbreak, as I was when out reporting in the field during those months. But wearing it constantly is another matter. I donned a mask when visiting hospitals where SARS patients had been housed. I wore it in the markets where wild animals that were the suspected source of the outbreak were being butchered, blood droplets flying. I wore it in crowded enclosed spaces that I couldn’t avoid, like airplanes and trains, as I traveled to cities involved in the outbreak, like Guangzhou and Hong Kong. You never know if the guy coughing and sneezing two rows ahead of you is ill or just has an allergy.

But outdoors, infections don’t spread well through the air. Those photos of people walking down streets in China wearing masks are dramatic but uninformed. And remember if a mask has, perchance, intercepted viruses that would have otherwise ended up in your body, then the mask is contaminated. So, in theory, to be protected maybe you should use a new one for each outing.

The simple masks are better than nothing, but not all that effective, since they don’t seal well. For anyone tempted to go out and buy the gold standard, N95 respirators, note that they are uncomfortable. Breathing is more work. It’s hard to talk to people. On one long flight at the height of the outbreak, on which my few fellow passengers were mostly epidemiologists trying to solve the SARS puzzle, many of us (including me) wore our masks for the first couple of hours on the flight. Then the food and beverage carts came.

Though viruses spread through droplets in the air, a bigger worry to me was always transmission via what doctors call “fomites,” infected items. A virus gets on a surface — a shoe or a doorknob or a tissue, for example. You touch the surface and then next touch your face or rub your nose. It’s a great way to acquire illness. So after walking in the animal markets, I removed my shoes carefully and did not take them into the hotel room. And of course I washed my hands immediately.

  • Fri, Mar 13, 2020 - 03:47am

    #5
    Janez

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    Coronavirus in Elevators – Looking for an advise

Tks for the input, guys.

 

So is Corona officially aerosolized or not ?

Been digging around and came across the following:

Coronavirus can live on surfaces for up to 3 days, in air for 3 hours – Study

https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2020.03.09.20033217v1.full.pdf

Abstract

HCoV-19 (SARS-2) has caused >88,000 reported illnesses with a current case-fatality ratio of ~2%. Here, we investigate the stability of viable HCoV-19 on surfaces and in aerosols in comparison with SARS CoV-1. Overall, stability is very similar between HCoV-19 and SARS-CoV-1.

We found that viable virus could be detected in aerosols up to 3 hours post aerosolization, up to 4 hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to 2-3 days on plastic and stainless steel. HCoV-19 and SARS-CoV-1 exhibited similar half-lives in aerosols, with median estimates around 2.7 hours.

Both viruses show relatively long viability on stainless steel and polypropylene compared to copper or cardboard: the median half-life estimate for HCoV-19 is around 13 hours on steel and around 16 hours on polypropylene.

Our results indicate that aerosol and fomite transmission of HCoV-19 is plausible, as the virus can remain viable in aerosols for multiple hours and on surfaces up to days.

 

The SARS epidemic in Hong Kong: what lessons have we learned?

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC539564/

How aerosolized SARS virus spread through block of apartments in HK via faulty/dry U-trap.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC539564/figure/fig2/?report=objectonly

 

Not sure how reliable this one is, but sounds okish

How covid-19 spreads through aerosol transmission?

Chang Liu

This video explain what is aerosol transmission and clearly tells us that it’s one way of spread for covid-19. Hence we should understand how it works to take precautions. Video also tells you 4 rules that you should follow and aerosol transmission is not that horrifying as long as you stick to those rules. But best recommendation will always be: 1. Wear a mask in a confined space includes elevator, public transportation, office. 2. Avoid interacting with other human beings and try your best to work from home.

 

 

 

  • Sat, Mar 14, 2020 - 08:54am

    #6
    Janez

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    Coronavirus in Elevators – Looking for an advise

And the missing Chinese study:

 

Coronavirus can travel twice as far as official ‘safe distance’ and stay in air for 30 minutes, Chinese study finds

Authorities advise people to stay 1-2 metres apart, but researchers found that a bus passenger infected fellow travellers sitting 4.5 metres away
The scientists behind the research said their investigation also highlighted the importance of wearing face masks because of the length of time it can linger

https://www.scmp.com/news/china/science/article/3074351/coronavirus-can-travel-twice-far-official-safe-distance-and-stay

Researchers said the case highlighted the importance of wearing masks on public transport.

Note: The study at the centre of this article on the transmission of the coronavirus was retracted on Tuesday by the journal Practical Preventive Medicine without giving a reason. The South China Morning Post has reached out to the paper’s authors and will update the article.

The coronavirus that causes Covid-19 can linger in the air for at least 30 minutes and travel up to 4.5 metres – further than the “safe distance” advised by health authorities around the world, according to a study by a team of Chinese government epidemiologists.

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