Community Building

Login or register to post comments Last Post 90918 reads   380 posts
Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 380 total)
  • Sun, Mar 29, 2009 - 04:01pm

    #11
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1616

    count placeholder

    Re: Community Building

Relax Poison Ivy,

There is absolutely nothing wrong with being a Republican, that was my feeble attempt at humor.  I should have put in one of those winking emoticons to better signal my intent.   I totally agree WTSHF it makes no difference what party your in, I bet it will be more a matter who gets it and who is willing to roll up their sleeves to do the work.  And that quality transcends party affliation.  

  • Sun, Mar 29, 2009 - 06:04pm

    #12
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1616

    count placeholder

    Re: Community Building

How did this thread start to get off topic?  Smile

 Lucas

  • Sun, Mar 29, 2009 - 06:45pm

    #13
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1616

    count placeholder

    Re: Community Building

[quote=coolhandluke]

How did this thread start to get off topic? Smile

Lucas

[/quote]

 

Sorry, but here I go… 

 

[quote=greendoc]

There is absolutely nothing wrong with being a Republican,

[/quote]

 

Greendoc, I have to disagree. Rupublicanism and Democratism are both belief systems. They both rely on a faith that the church of the Republicans or the church of the Democrats will save us from the tyranny of the other. It is the classic divide and rule tactics of the hidden oligarchs behind politics, those being the bankers, leaders of big industry etc etc.

 

So whats wrong with being a republican? The same thing thats wrong with being a Democrat: blind faith and a limited point of view. I think one of the clearest things from the crash course is that both parties have consistently acted against the interests of the people of the world and neither party is ever going to save us from anything.

 

I kind of sympathise with Poison, not because I am ‘concervative’ but in that the labelling of ‘liberal’ and ‘concervative’ is unhelpful and instead of trying to box people into categories so we can say they are like us or they are different we should just be listening to everyone and trying to understand everyone’s point of view. The political spectrum is the same tool – dividing us. What we need is unity in these times, not division. After all, as Greendoc says, when push comes to shove most people will find the humanity within themselves to help one another within their community, regardless of the lines we may or may not have drawn in the sand over our percieved stand points on certain theoretical concepts about such abstractions as Unempoyment or Education which are no more than political footballs in a game where both sides are shooting in the same goal and the only losers are the crowd.

 

Sorry for going on a bit and a bit off topic, but I thought I’d get that off my chest a little,

 

hugs,

 

Crash 

  • Sun, Mar 29, 2009 - 10:08pm

    #14
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1616

    count placeholder

    Re: Community Building

Get back on topic, or I’m bringing the Hooligan back.
Dogs knows what I’m talkin’ about.

As a Republican myself, (or, more accurately, a conservative) I share Greendocs views. The Republican party sold me out, and left me holding the bag.

I didn’t see a slam, and I don’t think any political comments made around here are in a malicious way.

I can understand your point though, Ivy. As a conservative in Washington, I have to work harder than a cat trying to bury a turd on a marble floor to convince people I’m not a heartless, gutless, money-grubber, but a principled person who believes in liberty and small government.

=)

Cheers!

Aaron

  • Sun, Mar 29, 2009 - 11:33pm

    #15
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1616

    count placeholder

    Re: Community Building

Some posts above report groups based on natural constraints such as 60 homes in a place. Most of us live in much larger societies with many hundreds, thousands or even millions of others.

There are various groupings that we can call community. Some may be by preference and others include many hundreds of people. These communities may be of little value if or when TSHTS. Assuming that we can return to or remain at our place of residence then practical community must mean our neighbours.

My opinion is that practical community needs to be of human scale and consist of less than 200 people including children. I have a number of reasons for this. Migration between groups is only a viable option if there are alternative groups. The smaller groups the greater the alternatives. In larger groups; leaders, despots, elites, oligarchies and hierarchy are all more likely. This could perhaps would lead to a structured group similar to our present society which is what has broken down. In smaller groups there is immediate accountability to the group and posturing, shamming and laziness are readily exposed. Small groups (tribes) have worked for us for 3 million years (after Daniel Quinn).

People can prepare for such practical groups in advance by identifying workable boundaries to capture a human scale number of people in total and to, where possible, include local resources considered of likely value to the group. These might include parks and waste land. Consideration can also be given in advance to the tools and other physical resources that might be of benefit to the group. These could include items such as seed, shade cloth and wire netting.

The time might not yet be right to form such groups but many of us here believe that a time is coming.

Those not convinced of the practicality of such groups may look at an example from Katrina cited by Ran Prieur at http://www.ranprieur.com

[quote=Ran Prier]
powerless people in the French Quarter formed tribes
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/9208714/
[/quote]

Don
________________________

still …

here …

still here

still here?

  • Tue, Mar 31, 2009 - 12:36am

    #16
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1616

    count placeholder

    Re: Community Building

[quote=pir8don]

 

My opinion is that practical community needs to be of human scale and consist of less than 200 people including children.

The time might not yet be right to form such groups but many of us here believe that a time is coming.

 

[/quote]

 

And even if the time is far off (where we’ll absolutely need these communities), we’d better get started laying some kind of groundwork.  Trust and cooperation take lots of time to build.  Without those two things, you run the risk of ending up in community with the wrong people, or people spend time duplication each other’s efforts to prepare (think of going to a potluck dinner where everybody brings a dessert and no main courses).

Viva — Sager 

  • Tue, Mar 31, 2009 - 04:51pm

    #17
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1616

    count placeholder

    Re: Community Building

SagerXX – thanks for sharing your story and starting this thread.   

I learned a lot from reading the posts from you and the other fine contributors to this blog.  You’ve convinced my wife and me that we should be investing more time building community "trust and co-operation" – besides, it could be a lot of fun.

Larry

  • Wed, Apr 08, 2009 - 11:02pm

    #18
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1616

    count placeholder

    Re: Community Building

Hey gang —

These quotes are from a speech called "Escape from the Zombie Food Court" by a guy named Joe Bageant.  He spoke at Berea College in Berea, KY, Eastern KY U and the Adler School of Professional Psychology in Chicago. 

The full text is here:  http://www.joebageant.com/joe/2009/04/escape-from-the-zombie-food-court.html

He speaks about waking up from the illusion of our American culture from the psychological point of view, and the importance of community and how its lack here in the US is a sickness upon the national spirit. I thought folks here might find these piquant:

(anything in parentheses is mine)   VIVA — Sager

 

"Fortunately though, we can meaningfully differentiate our lives (at least in the Western sense) in the way we choose to employ our consciousness. Which is to say, to own our consciousness. If we exercise enough personal courage, we can possess the freedom to discover real meaning and value in our all-too-brief lives. We either wake up to life, or we do not. We are either in charge of our own awareness or we let someone else manage it by default. That we have a choice is damned good news. 

The bad news is that we nevertheless remain one of the most controlled peoples on the planet, especially regarding control of our consciousness, public and private. And the control is tightening. I know it doesn’t feel like that to most Americans. But therein rests the proof. Everything feels normal; everybody else around us is doing the same things, so it must be OK. This is a sort of Stockholm Syndrome of the soul, in which the prisoner identifies with the values of his or her captors, which in our case is of course, the American corporate state and its manufactured popular culture. 

When we feel that such a life is normal, even desirable, and we act accordingly, we become helpless. Learned helplessness. For instance, most Americans believe there is little they can do in personally dealing with the most important moral and material crises ever faced, both in America and across the planet, beginning with ecocide, war making, and the grotesque deformation of the democratic process we have settled for. Citizenship has been reduced to simple consumer group consciousness." 

 

"Why prefer these expensive earth destroying things (fast food, inefficient transport, overlarge houses) over love and laughter with real people, and making real human music together with other human beings — lifting our voices together, dancing and enjoying the world that was given to us? Absolutely for free. "

 

"So how do you escape the programming of the food court, and, I might include, escape even those parts of this school that may serve more to indoctrinate than enlighten you? All pedagogy, even the best, is nevertheless about control. How does one escape such a total system?


In a word, service. Humble and thoughtful service to the world. It is heartening that we do have concerned Americans studying to alleviate the great suffering of so much of humanity. I have no proof of it, but it seems like earnest idealism is making a comeback since its decline following the optimistic 1960s. People and institutions such as this one are attempting to move American society forward again, heal us of our national sickness to the extent you can, after decades of regression, not to mention repression. Of course, to solve problems you must first identify them. "

 

"They (people who are actively seeking to decouple from The System / build community) seem to already know what it took me a lifetime to learn: that each of us is but one strand in the vast organic web of flesh and blood chlorophyll. All things and all beings are inextricably connected at the most profound level. Any physicist will confirm this. We are bound by its every wave and particle, all of us — the lonely night clerk at Motel 6 and the leviathans of the deep, the sleeping grandmother in New Haven, Connecticut and the maimed Iraqi child in Kirkuk. It can be understood by anyone though, simply by owning one’s own consciousness. And in doing so we find that ownership and domination are both temporary and meaningless. And that the animating spirit of the earth is real and within us and claimable.

The purpose of life is to know this. Einstein glimpsed it. Lao-Tzu knew it. So did St. Francis. But you and I are not supposed to. It would shatter the revered, digitized, super-sized, utterly meaningless hologram. The one that mesmerizes us, and mediates our every experience, but isolates us from universal humanness and its coursing energies. Such as love. Or mercy. Compassion. Existential pain. Hunger. Or the unmitigated joy of simply being alive one finds in children everywhere, even among the poorest. Most of the human race still lives in that realm."

 

 

  • Wed, Apr 08, 2009 - 11:56pm

    #19
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1616

    count placeholder

    Re: Community Building

I bought a copy of the CC DVDs and they arrived last week.  I’m planning (w/the guy who turned me on to CM.com) to do a presentation of the CC at a local community center in the next month-6 weeks.  Trying to get folks on the same page as the CC, and maybe pick up some likely prospects for the community me’n’wife are building.

Anybody here done a presentation of the CC for their local community (i.e., standing in front of people in a room as opposed to dishing copies of the CC to friends/family)?  I’d be very interested in hearing your stories / advice re a successful show.

Thanks in advance.

Viva — Sager 

  • Thu, Apr 09, 2009 - 12:12am

    #20
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Oct 31 2017

    Posts: 1616

    count placeholder

    These Folks Know Community

Snowplows clear roads for transplant patient

Convoy plows path in whiteout conditions for man who needed new liver

updated 3:42 p.m. ET, Tues., April 7, 2009

CASPER, Wyo. – Chuck Forbes has battled liver disease for half of his 59 years. When the time finally came for a transplant, a blizzard blocked his route to the hospital — until a corps of snowplow drivers saved the day.

Forbes was recovering after undergoing transplant surgery Sunday at the University of Colorado Hospital in Denver. He and his wife, Ruth, made it there from their home in northwest Wyoming despite the storm that closed roads Saturday in the southeastern part of the state.

"I hope those WYDOT (Wyoming Department of Transportation) guys know they performed a miracle," Ruth Forbes said.

She said her husband had been on a transplant waiting list for about a year when "we got a surprise call totally out of the blue at 7:30 on Saturday morning."

They had already made it all the way to Wheatland, some 250 miles southeast of their home in Meeteetse, when they encountered a road-closing barrier Saturday afternoon. A bit panicked, Ruth Forbes called 911.

"The operator said ‘The road is closed, we’ve been forecasting this storm all week,’" she said. "Then she said ‘Hang on, I’ll get a patrolman to come talk to you.’"

Trooper Chuck Bloom arrived, talked to the couple and then returned to his patrol car.

"He came back to our car and said, ‘If you wait right here, the area boss for WYDOT will be right here,’" Ruth Forbes said. "In a matter of 10 minutes, we had a convoy of plow trucks."

The couple followed nearly on the bumper of a plow truck from Wheatland in whiteout conditions.

Other trucks joined their caravan to plow a wider path.

In Cheyenne, one plow led them through the city. South of the city, another snowplow driver got them to the state line.

In all, the escort involved eight snowplows and covered some 80 miles.

They made it to the hospital at about 9:30 p.m. Chuck Forbes underwent his transplant at 7 a.m. Sunday.

"He is having a heck of a time getting out of the anesthesia, but they say that’s normal because of all of the meds he’s on," his wife said. "But the transplant went wonderfully."

 

This story made today bearable.

Viewing 10 posts - 11 through 20 (of 380 total)

Login or Register to post comments