Chloroquine HOAX!

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  • Mon, Mar 16, 2020 - 04:03pm

    #1
    denisgoddard

    denisgoddard

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    Chloroquine HOAX!

Yesterday I saw an article circulating that appears to be an academic paper inexplicably published on a little-used decentralzied Internet system called IPFS: https://ipfs.infura.io/ipfs/QmNcF4usFUJdGjTMtEXT1XAYybJvtLmEjaZnvNXN2n91Zh/

It sure looked legit. I was so distracted by knowing (as an IT guy) that IPFS is a legit Internet standard (of which I am a particular fan), it’s only a few minutes ago I bothered trying to find any other information about the authors of the paper.

Oh my God, now I am looking, it’s an *obvious* hoax. I really want to know who perpetrated it.

I DuckDuckGo searched ‘Thomas R. Broker, PhD Stanford ‘, and the top result sure looked legit from the preview:

Biography. Tom Broker (b. 1944) received his B.A. in Chemistry from Wesleyan University (Middletown CT, 1966), followed by a Ph.D. in Biochemistry from Stanford School of Medicine (1972) for electron microscopic and genetic studies of bacteriophage T4 DNA recombination pathways, structures and DNA branch migration in the laboratory of Robert Lehman.

However, the URL this purports to be a preview of actually just redirects to what appears to be a department homepage; see screenshot.

Somebody appears to have gone to some trouble to quietly take control of the uab.edu webserver, get a page there top-ranked on search engines for an expected query, and then erase the page. I’d love to know who was behind this hoax.

  • Fri, Mar 20, 2020 - 01:10pm

    #2
    AKTED

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    Chloroquine HOAX!

Since Chris Martinson mentioned it in his video and cited some sources I gave this some credibility. However they were small studies and as Chris said it MIGHT help. As I have underlying health issues I asked my nurse about it and she said they are doing some tests on this. So it appears that some people in the medical community are taking it seriously.

However I am not a doctor and I would need to get more information. Like will it have any negative interactions with my current medications? What’s the dose? How can I determine whether I need it or not?

  • Sat, Mar 21, 2020 - 06:24am

    #3
    jjhw

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    Chloroquine HOAX!

China and S. Korea have both been using chloroquine to effectively treat patients, links below

Expert consensus on chloroquine phosphate for the treatment of novel coronavirus pneumonia

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/32075365/

Physicians work out treatment guidelines for coronavirus
http://www.koreabiomed.com/news/articleView.html?idxno=7428

  • Sat, Mar 21, 2020 - 10:54am

    #4
    matfax

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    Reply To: Chloroquine HOAX!

Quinine derivates such as Chloroquine are risky in their use. There are about 400 million people worldwide who have a hereditary enzyme deficiency called G6PD deficiency. They are lucky in that way that they don’t need this Quinine as an anti-malaria drug because the G6PD deficiency basically makes them immune to Malaria. So if a clinician submits a Malaria patient, they don’t have to worry about it. But if they were treated with it, the Quinine derivate would cause acute hemolysis. The last thing you want to see happen in a patient with pneumonia is hemolysis. Quinines are also troublesome in diseases of the nerves such as MG because they reduce the “activation” of nerve impulses at the nerve endings by blocking ACh receptors. Short breathiness due to reduced impulse activation of the respiratory system (i.e., breathing) might be another complication in older patients because their nerves aren’t in best shape regardless of disease. I think it’s safe in young and mid-aged patients with identified genetic G6PD status who have no side conditions or weak muscles. Genetic testing of G6PD status may be waived for patients who have good knowledge about their heritage and ethnicity status since G6PD deficiency originates from African, Asian and Mediterranean ethnicities.

Regardless of acute treatment, there is no proof that early intake of Quinines has any protective effect against virus infections. This study showed that Chloroquine inhibited immune response when taken early. I think the mechanism behind is that IL-6 needs a normal level for a healthy immune response. Downregulating IL-6 with Chloroquine when IL-6 levels aren’t elevated will hence cause adverse effects. I tried to explain this aspect of cytokines in my comment here.

  • Sun, Mar 22, 2020 - 10:21am

    #5
    viraltruth

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    Association with the research paper’s authors denied by Stanford Medicine

https://med.stanford.edu/covid19.html

“Stanford Medicine was not involved in a widely circulating Google document or research paper suggesting that chloroquine is a potential treatment for COVID-19. Claims that we were involved are false. Please refer to this site for accurate information about COVID-19, and please consult a physician before taking any sort of prescription medication.”

Thomas Booker, PhD, is not at Stanford.

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