Career Decisions for the Transition

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  • Sat, Sep 24, 2011 - 06:14pm

    #11

    frobn

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    Bananacarrot wrote:I want to

[quote=Bananacarrot]I want to start preparing, but I feel very stuck. Graduate school takes up so much time & energy that it feels like an either/or situation.  Finishing school, or focusing on the Transition. Maybe I can find a way to combine the two.[/quote]

You have the right idea about combining the two.

John Michael Greer’s recently blogged about alternative medicine and healing that will eventually replace a good part of our costly medical healthcare system.  A psychologist can use or develop skills with relaxation training, hypnotherapy and therapeutic touch to treat many health aliments such as pain alleviation. I mention pain alleviation because I did an internship in a pain center as a graduate student and today I have noticed many ads for pain centers. Most psych graduate programs offer courses in hypnosis and I know that such schools as NYU, The New School and City University of NY offer courses in "laying-on-of-hands" and "therapeutic touch" so it is something that is in the mainstream even today.

  • Sun, Sep 25, 2011 - 04:59am

    #12
    ao

    ao

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    frobn wrote:John Michael

[quote=frobn]

John Michael Greer’s recently blogged about alternative medicine and healing that will eventually replace a good part of our costly medical healthcare system.  A psychologist can use or develop skills with relaxation training, hypnotherapy and therapeutic touch to treat many health aliments such as pain alleviation. I mention pain alleviation because I did an internship in a pain center as a graduate student and today I have noticed many ads for pain centers. Most psych graduate programs offer courses in hypnosis and I know that such schools as NYU, The New School and City University of NY offer courses in "laying-on-of-hands" and "therapeutic touch" so it is something that is in the mainstream even today.

[/quote]

With all due respect, I think I’d pass on the "therapeutic touch" and "laying-on-of-hands" courses.  This stuff has been around a long time and, truthfully, I don’t know anyone who is making a living offf of it nor making great changes on an enduring basis.  It is pleasant and soothing (as is lying out on a hammock in the sunshine with a pleasant breeze and the birds chirping) but effectively and lastingly treating pain requires both a specificity and a comprehensiveness that is sorely lacking in these approaches.  Also, psychological health professionals are usually not licensed to touch so you start entering some dicey "gray" medicolegal areas unless one has credentialing that legitimizes touching a patient therapeuticially.  There are a lot of individuals who claim to treat pain nowadays and many of them, quite frankly, just aren’t up to their claims, to be polite.  I’m thinking of someone I just discharged who was pain free after 4 visits after having seen someone else for over 7 months of regular treatment with no relief.  Hypnosis, on the other hand, offers a great deal of potential and is generally under utilized.  A talented Ericksonian hypnotist could be of enormous benefit to a great many people.

  • Sun, Sep 25, 2011 - 01:07pm

    #13

    frobn

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    ao wrote:With all due

[quote=ao]

With all due respect, I think I’d pass on the "therapeutic touch" and "laying-on-of-hands" courses.  This stuff has been around a long time and, truthfully, I don’t know anyone who is making a living offf of it nor making great changes on an enduring basis.  It is pleasant and soothing (as is lying out on a hammock in the sunshine with a pleasant breeze and the birds chirping) but effectively and lastingly treating pain requires both a specificity and a comprehensiveness that is sorely lacking in these approaches.  Also, psychological health professionals are usually not licensed to touch so you start entering some dicey "gray" medicolegal areas unless one has credentialing that legitimizes touching a patient therapeuticially.  There are a lot of individuals who claim to treat pain nowadays and many of them, quite frankly, just aren’t up to their claims, to be polite.  I’m thinking of someone I just discharged who was pain free after 4 visits after having seen someone else for over 7 months of regular treatment with no relief.  Hypnosis, on the other hand, offers a great deal of potential and is generally under utilized.  A talented Ericksonian hypnotist could be of enormous benefit to a great many people.[/quote]

I agree with a lot of what you are saying. The point though is that things are changing rapidly and what we consider productive work today will not be available in the future. My post was a meager attempt to look at how we might translate skills we already have to future work. And yes, there are many quakes in the medical field some of which are highly credentialed practitioners. Many of the numerous ads for pain alleviation are simply pain pill mills –a talented Ericksonian hypnotist would be a great improvement. BTW I attended several of Dr. Erickson’s seminars before he passed away and highly recommend his techniques. Jay Haley’s writings and NPL by Bandler and Grinder come to mind.

  • Sun, Sep 25, 2011 - 03:04pm

    #14
    ao

    ao

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    frobn wrote: Jay Haley’s

[quote=frobn]

 Jay Haley’s writings and NPL by Bandler and Grinder come to mind.

[/quote]

Just for those who may want to research more, it’s NLP (Neuro Linguistic Programming) rather than NPL.

  • Tue, Sep 27, 2011 - 11:19am

    #15

    Retha Scott

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    Stay the course!

[quote=RNcarl]

My advice is simple,

My story is not.

In 1973 all I wanted to do was fly jets. The oil embargo put doubt into continued supply of oil. Some were even predicting the "end" of air travel. By 1977 (my high school graduation year – yes I am old) I had all but given up my dream of becoming a pilot because of the turmoil in the economy concerning fuel and it’s related costs.

If I would have "stayed the course" I would most likely now be retired and would have enjoyed a fulfilling life long dream career.

Now, having taken a different path – I have no regrets because my journey has given me a loving family and children.

But, my experience has shown me to believe in the old adage, "Do what you love to do and the money will follow and you will never ‘work’ a day in your life."

Coaching, mentoring, leading, persuading, team building – those will be the most important traits to have during the transition. Helping others to cope with the profound change will also be needed.

Lastly, have you started your program and how far along are you? I have a different take on education (true learning) than others. They can take your money, your house and you car, but they can never take from you that which you have learned.

Good Luck!!!

 

[/quote]

 This is the BEST advise anyone can give you!  

And I will add…continue & finish your formal education!  You are so close!  If you stop now and tell yourself you will go back later…you won’t.  That is my experience.  Something will always come up to convince you to put it off until later.  Time goes by faster than you can imagine.  Even with events unfolding as they appear to be in our world today, not only will your earning power over the course of your life be greater, you will be able to bring a specialized knowledge to your community.  That will be a skill greatly needed if and when things really go bad. 

Start small to prepare…every time you go to the grocery store, buy 1 or 2 extras of canned goods.  Have a pantry or shelf designated for your ‘stash’.  For a couple of dollars a week, before you know it, you will have a nice little food stash.  Just make sure you keep it separate from your weekly groceries…variety is good too…you don’t want to eat pinto beans every day!     

Find a hobby that could be a money maker or barter opportunity if things get really bad.  I have a friend that knits hats, another makes candles & another builds sheds.  I have a small garden.  

Participating & developing relationships in your community with like minded people is of most importance.  Even though you feel stuck, there are many things you can do to prepare.  It’s not necessary to change everything, pack it up and head for the hills…if it ever gets to that point, you will know.  Stay the course…

~Good luck!

  • Tue, Sep 27, 2011 - 02:06pm

    #16

    frobn

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    ao wrote:frobn wrote:  Jay

[quote=ao]

[quote=frobn]

 Jay Haley’s writings and NPL by Bandler and Grinder come to mind.

[/quote]Just for those who may want to research more, it’s NLP (Neuro Linguistic Programming) rather than NPL.[/quote]

Thanks for the correction.

  • Tue, Oct 04, 2011 - 06:00pm

    #17
    Peak Prosperity Admin

    Peak Prosperity Admin

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     Thanks everyone for your

 Thanks everyone for your posts.  The suggestion regarding hypnosis is an interesting one I had not considered before – that’ll definitely go into my box of ideas for future niches!   After much deliberation over the last month I think I have decided to stick things out with my program.  Hopefully it will be worthwhile in the end (finger’s crossed)!  In the meantime – I’m looking into learning how to can my own fruits and vegetables 🙂 

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