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California Drought

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  • Wed, Apr 08, 2015 - 06:51am

    #1
    .

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    California Drought

There the governor goes making things complicated again, which of course is how governments always seem to do things. If they want to reduce water usage by 25% raise everyone’s rates by 25% !  This is simple and fair, no water police needed. Oh, but it will hurt the poor, you say. If they cut their water usage by the required 25% their monthly bill would not go up! Simple. They might also consider doubling the rates on any households that use twice the average household, simple! Makes common sense to me.                                                marshall 61866

 

  • Thu, Apr 09, 2015 - 12:54pm

    #2
    Jamie Mason

    Jamie Mason

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    When I lived in Monterey, CA

When I lived in Monterey, CA I remember answering a survey from the water company about the number of people in the household and the amount of acreage so that they could compute the cut offs of the different rate tiers. The lowest tier was pretty generous and affordable but if you got into a higher tier the marginal cost went up really fast. I think I would reduce the amount of water charged at the lowest price tier to a bare bones minimum that would provide enough for cooking, cleaning and a little laundry but force you into the higher tiers for "luxury" high volume uses like lawn watering, pool filling, and long, non-flow-restricted showers.  

  • Sat, Apr 11, 2015 - 03:39pm

    #3

    sand_puppy

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    Time to Leave CA?

My wife and I moved out of Santa Cruz, CA about 4 years ago for economic reasons:  we were not finding good jobs and we couldn't afford to purchase a home.  Now the drought issue has come to the fore front.

Record low snow packs indicate that this summer will be even dryer.  (Snow pack is the source of summer water.)

Questions for California PP members:  

1.  How are you responding to this issue?  

2.  Are you considering moving away from California?

3.  If not, what specific information might change your mind?

Is it time for CA preppers and resilient livers to consider moving?

If we wait for the consensus opinion to swing fully into the need-to-move camp, you won't be able to sell your house.  And you will be emigrating WITH millions of others.  If moving is where you will ultimately end up, wouldn't it be good to figure this out BEFORE the masses?

 

  • Sat, Apr 11, 2015 - 05:04pm

    #4

    pinecarr

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    Sand_Puppy said:”Questions

Sand_Puppy said:

"Questions for California PP members:  

1.  How are you responding to this issue?  

2.  Are you considering moving away from California?

3.  If not, what specific information might change your mind?

Is it time for CA preppers and resilient livers to consider moving?

If we wait for the consensus opinion to swing fully into the need-to-move camp, you won't be able to sell your house.  And you will be emigrating WITH millions of others.  If moving is where you will ultimately end up, wouldn't it be good to figure this out BEFORE the masses?"

Your last paragraph is where my thinking would be, Sand_Puppy.  I don't live in CA, but I had family who lived in Southern CA, and I was very relieved when they moved back east.  And that was a few years ago, even before the drought was as big a concern. 

It is possible the drought could end, and the water shortage would no longer be the risk it is.  But betting on that is a gamble.  And the downside consequences of taking that risk, if the drought does continue, could be huge.  So from a risk management perspective, I would have your exact same concerns.  

One of the lessons I try to teach my son (and live by, myself) is that the easiest way to solve a problem is to avoid it in the first place.  I would not want to find myself, in the future, in the parts of CA affected by the drought if it were to continue, trying to cope or get out at the same time as millions of others.  You have the advantage right now of time and foresight.  But I know, it is much easier said than done!

Good luck with your decision!

 

  • Sat, Apr 11, 2015 - 05:20pm

    #5

    Time2help

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    RE: Time to Leave CA?

It's always a good time to leave California.

  • Wed, Apr 15, 2015 - 11:21am

    #6

    pinecarr

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    Drought Number One Emergency in California-Ellen Brown

http://usawatchdog.com/drought-number-one-emergency-in-california-ellen-brown/

So, with just one year’s worth of water left in California, what is being done other than conservation?  Brown, shockingly, says, “There are no solutions that are happening right now.  We have had conservation and toilets that use less water, but I don’t see the government doing anything that will fix the problem right now. . . . The plan seems to be charge more for water, but that doesn’t fix the problem.  I have read that officials have said we have no backup plan.”

Join Greg Hunter as he goes One-on-One with Ellen Brown, creator of the “Web of Debt Blog,” which can be found on EllenBrown.com.

  • Wed, Apr 15, 2015 - 02:38pm

    #7

    sand_puppy

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    California Drought: From the Ecological Outside in

It seems to me that the California drought offers a clear risk of ecological collapse.  Though California collapse is NOT a certainty, it is a real risk.  Some of the collapse principles discussed here on pp might apply.

One of the principles of collapse oft discussed is that collapse proceeds from the outside in.  Ecologically, the "outside" can include fishing villages, the edges of a suburban sprawl, South Dakota shale towns, and cities located in deserts.   

Another is that we are surprised when collapse happens–even when it was a process unfolding over time and leaving a visible trail of evidence–somehow we just don't get it. (World War Z "Tenth Man" quote.)   Another way of saying this, is that until A Possible future scenario becomes The Single Most Probable scenario, we reject it.  Then when it happens, we are shocked.

Another is that collapse happens gradually, then all of a sudden.

Another is that as complex societies fail, we will be turned back to a subsistence farming / small-town-business-craftsmen type of social order.  The local carrying capacity of a geographical area becomes important again.   Were it not for fleets of 18 wheelers bringing in food and hundreds of pumping stations delivering water, how many people could live in an area?

Another is to collapse early and avoid the rush.  (Thanks Dimitri)

Another is that human beings will fight over scarce resources.  An 300 mile long canal that carries water away from one water starved community to another is at risk for being disrupted or diverted even if the distant community legally owns the water rights. 

 

The California Aqueduct brings water from the Owens River to LA.  The Owens Valley was a lush farmland in the early 1900s.  After LA gained control of the water rights to the river it reverted back to desert.  Farmers fought for control of the river, but lost when federal troops were brought in to defend LA's water rights.

The Colorado River Aqueduct

If I were living in California right now, I would be exploring my options for re-locating.  At least starting the thought process.  If I needed to leave, where would I go?  What are property values like there?  How big a house do I want?  Is the extended family going to be living with me soon?  Do I want to garden and raise chickens myself, or should I look for an apartment/house in a smaller town surrounded by farmers?  

How would you expect the value of your current California home to fare should a mass exodus from the state begin?  Would I like to sell my home before or during the exodus?  

Collapse early and avoid the rush.

–Dimitri Orlov

 

  • Tue, Apr 21, 2015 - 04:35am

    #8

    lambertad

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    Interesting times

Sand_puppy,

I think your comments are spot on, but I just wanted to provide a little example to back up your view.

I'm living out here in SLC, Utah and a few months ago a local university released a report regarding our water situation. It turns out, that our most recent 50 years were the second wettest 50 years in a 1200 year span. They figured this out by looking at the tree rings of a certain type of tree (I forget the specie/s).

So, the problem isn't that our most recent 50 years were the second wettest on record, it's the fact that we built our expectations/future predictions on these most recent 50 years thinking it would persist. Some day soon reversion to the mean will happen and we'll swing the opposite direction and we are going to have a tough decade(s)/centuries. Things are going to have to shrink, and by things I mean lawns, shower times, the number of car washes, the size of gardens, the number of boats on the shrinking reservoirs, etc. There are literally no other options.

We plan on moving out of SLC as soon as my wife and I are done with grad school. She's going to be making at least $30,000/yr more than me unless I get an amazing residency, so I'm totally fine with working part time or not at all while getting our farmstead up and running. I'm used to hard work (grew up on a farm) and feel like providing for my family and putting in an honest days work on a farm is more fulfilling than just about any office job every could be.

I've got some areas in mind, but that could all change by the time we're done with school.

Great post and thanks for reminding us that things are always changing and we need to be ahead of the curve, even if the curve is only herd mentality.

 

  • Tue, Apr 21, 2015 - 05:34am

    #9

    Time2help

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    William Shatner wants Seattle’s water; proposes pipeline

William Shatner wants Seattle's water; proposes pipeline

"I want $30 billion in my Kickstarter campaign to build a pipeline, like the Alaska pipeline, say from Seattle, a place where there's a lot of water, there's too much water," Shatner said. "And bring it down here and fill up one of our lakes."

I miss Spock.

  • Wed, Apr 22, 2015 - 05:58pm

    #10
    agitating prop

    agitating prop

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    Major desalination plants in

Major desalination plants in planning stages all up and down the coast to provide drinking cooking bathwater for Californians. If you think the powers that be are going to let trillions of dollars worth of real estate crater in a crucial military and commercial zone…you are underestimating the prime motivators of human beings — greed AND fear. 

If I was living on the California coast I would relax. Inland empire?  I would be getting my ditch kit ready. We are all going to be subject to crazy high produce prices for quite some time.

But good news is the drought is going to require new farming methods, and hopefully destroy agribusiness as it is currently construed — and the insane cruelty of factory farms. Millions of pigs send a victory chorus of oinks across a bacon saturated land. 

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