Break-Through Energy Technologies

Login or register to post comments Last Post 3328 reads   13 posts
Viewing 3 posts - 11 through 13 (of 13 total)
  • Thu, Dec 08, 2016 - 03:03am

    #11

    Bytesmiths

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 28 2008

    Posts: 144

    count placeholder

    Care to summarize?

@Cello55: Care to summarize the video for those of us who don't have time to watch 25 minute videos?

I scrolled around a bit, it it seemed to be mostly talking heads. Bo-ring!

I was hoping it would show me some way to improve my biodiesel brewing… but I don't have 25 minutes to put into it.

  • Fri, May 12, 2017 - 04:45pm

    #12

    000

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Dec 10 2013

    Posts: 130

    count placeholder

    I have one word, you listening? plastics

http://enenews.com/new-fear-of-explosions-in-fukushima-nuclear-waste-threatens-to-spontaneously-combust-millions-of-tons-of-radioactive-material-could-be-released-nuclear-expert-japanese-government-is-te

  • Wed, May 17, 2017 - 08:29pm

    #13

    silvervarg

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

    Joined: Mar 28 2010

    Posts: 30

    count placeholder

    Don’t worry

No, those bags of contaminated waste are not going to explode or even start burning.

It is slightly bad that they leak radioactivity into the atmosphere, but it is a tiny problem compared to the radioactive release they had during and shortly after the accident.

Most of the content of the bags are soil that does contain some organic material. As the organic decaying part is a low fraction it will heat up less than a poorly working compost pile. Unless you are worried that your backyard compost pile will explode there is no need to worry about this.

If there where a large quantity of organic material composting in there a good way to reduce the risk is to poke a hole to let gas and heat release easier. Essentially making it a less efficient composting pile, and this seems to be exactly what they have done. It is probably not needed, but as the cost of doing this action is very low it seems like a reasonable thing to do.

Like any composting pile the majority of the composting will be done the first year, so unless something has happened the first year you are safe.

As for the guy that mentions "What if it gets struck by lightning"…come on, this is really tin-foil-hat-alert. A pile of mostly soil will be really really poor a burning even if lightning hits it. There would be soo many other places that a lightning hit would cause more problems.

 

Viewing 3 posts - 11 through 13 (of 13 total)

Login or Register to post comments