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Anonymity versus openness of identity in forums

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  • Mon, Dec 15, 2008 - 01:58am

    #45
    SamLinder

    SamLinder

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    Posts: 289

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    Re: Anonymity versus openness of identity in forums

[quote=Futuo]This thread has made me smile. It’s encouraging to see this sense of tight-knit community prevail. That being said, i’ll try to find a reasonable picture to join the party =] I feel like everyone here is respectful and kind enough to not disregard my opinion when you realize that i’m still in high school…
[/quote]

I’ve been reading this thread for a while now and haven’t had the urge to jump in with my two cents worth as I’m one of those who feel that it is irrelevant if a poster is anonymous or not as long as they participate in an intelligent and thoughtful way.

I only object to anonymity when a poster takes advantage of such a state to flame and otherwise act in an obnoxious manner – something I’m happy to say that I have not noticed with this community.

That said, I think Futuo’s comment (quoted above) raises an interesting point. Personally, I (at age 64) am delighted that someone still in high school is willing to get involved and post as Futuo has done. Many issues on this site are complex and have even strained my aged brain! The fact that Futuo continues to participate is indicative of an intelligent person with a significant understanding of what this CC is all about. Good on you, Futuo!

Now, having said that, I wonder how many of you out there will readjust (downgrade?) your perception of Futuo’s posts now that Futuo’s age has been revealed. Those who will think less of Futuo based on age shows that there can be a good reason for one to "hide" behind a screen name and/or avatar. Revealing all is not always the good idea it seems to be at first glance.

Sam Linder (real name)

No picture as I can’t find one that does me justice (I’m ready for my closeup Mr. DeMille!).

  • Mon, Dec 15, 2008 - 02:14am

    #46
    Brainless

    Brainless

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    Posts: 76

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    Re: Anonymity versus openness of identity in forums

Stealing creditcard numbers from a retailer is not identity theft. I can write a whole post about that subject but instead i contributed on wiki about it. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Identity_theft

In short it is very easy for someone to link your name and things you say in posts and combine that with public records like digital phonebooks. Name, age, work etc are retrieved from tens or hundreds of posts and can be used to get creditcards, hotelreservations, loans, etc.

 

  • Mon, Dec 15, 2008 - 02:31am

    #47

    Chris Martenson

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    Re: Anonymity versus openness of identity in forums

Something profound and important that I can’t quite articulate yet has happened here for me.

I find myself quite moved by nearly all of the words written here. 

Seeing some actual names and faces has created a real shift in me.  I find myself fascinated, powerfully drawn to the names and faces as though parched and near a spring. I find my misty, half-formed impressions suddenly clarifying around a real person.  I am not embarrassed to say that I will think and respond differently as a result. 

As far as building connections and community, this is right and it is good.  As far as I know it is somewhat new to a public forum and therefore it is bold.  Let’s keep a close eye on it and if any problems result, we’ll evaluate them as they come.

I honor everyone’s personal decisions and place along this continuum from anonymous lurking to full-on name recognition.

Thank you all for being here, and thank you for contributing your time, dedication, possibly money and now maybe your name.

Best,
Chris Martenson

  • Mon, Dec 15, 2008 - 02:37am

    #48

    brandenism

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    Re: Anonymity versus openness of identity in forums

[quote=Brainless]

Stealing creditcard numbers from a retailer is not identity theft. I can write a whole post about that subject but instead i contributed on wiki about it. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Identity_theft

In short it is very easy for someone to link your name and things you say in posts and combine that with public records like digital phonebooks. Name, age, work etc are retrieved from tens or hundreds of posts and can be used to get creditcards, hotelreservations, loans, etc.

 

[/quote]

 

I’m far more afraid that I could be involved in a car accident this winter than of someone stealing my identity from things I have posted online.

 

You can be open and not be an idiot and post critical things such as your SSN.  I think illegitimate fears are rather crippling on society.  For example, the fact that many Americans (although the percent is decreasing since 9/11) are afraid of being involved in a terrorist attack, when it’s more likely for them to die from peanuts.

 

One of the things that I think is great is the pure diversity of posters.  Everything from young college students (such as myself), to retirees forming a community around profound issues that affect us all dramatically is rather encouraging.

  • Mon, Dec 15, 2008 - 05:18am

    #49
    radiance

    radiance

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    Re: Anonymity versus openness of identity in forums

I am the founder an organization that assists religious minorities who are either seeking asylum from persecution and or running for their life, hiding in their own nation. In the last few weeks hundreds of people have been put to death for simply believing differently from the majority.As usual these deaths are largely unreported by the global media. I hope to visit some of the nations in 2009 so this is a little unnerving but for the sake of camaraderie found in transparency I will share my name and when I figure out the computer stuff, post a picture; unless after a season of silently counting the costs and listening for a still small voice, I conclude safety of other innocents demand otherwise. I know first hand the pressure of violent terror in to many cases. It’s real to me and it’s sobering.        
Chris, I appreciate your efforts and in many ways I sense we cross paths in our hearts desire. Your decision to forgo profit speaks volumes of your desire for the common good. I carefully weighed Krogoth’s cogent suggestion to preserve profit in your venture. I saw a high degree of wisdom in his thinking. However your decision demonstrates a selfless intent that will serve the agenda well. I have many apprehensions about the possible roads the Crash Course could travel especially with an implied need for population control. I am not saying you have implied such but it is a logical consideration in general. Your integrity demonstrated thus far sooths some concerns I have regarding possible agendas that could evolve with time. Evil always comes shrouded in apparent truths. Eugenics has since 1945 gone underground so to speak, but it is still very much alive and a threat to humanity. I have a keen ear for discerning the voice of evil that often finds articulation in unknowing, unsuspecting, otherwise civil men. I am glad to say I have never heard from you or the staff anything that would sound an alarm of caution regarding anything.   
Ron Fink
  • Mon, Dec 15, 2008 - 09:51am

    #50

    ckessel

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

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    Re: Anonymity versus openness of identity in forums

[quote=srlinder]

Good on you, Futuo!

Now, having said that, I wonder how many of you out there will readjust (downgrade?) your perception of Futuo’s posts now that Futuo’s age has been revealed. Those who will think less of Futuo based on age shows that there can be a good reason for one to "hide" behind a screen name and/or avatar. Revealing all is not always the good idea it seems to be at first glance.

Sam Linder (real name)

No picture as I can’t find one that does me justice (I’m ready for my closeup Mr. DeMille!).

[/quote]

Sam, 

I consider there will always be those who choose to downgrade their opinions of others due to personal bias. Unfortunately that is something that even persons who are young adults (vs. old-er adults like you and me) have to learn. When that happens hopefully we can share some of the old-er wisdom with the younger ones to even the field.

That said, I think that those who have been less polluted from living a whole lifetime within the "system" will likely be a huge asset and have the perspective we need to see us through these turbulent times.

 

  • Mon, Dec 15, 2008 - 12:39pm

    #70

    ampers

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    Posts: 19

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    Re: Heroes in Action: Michael Höhne

I read the first few postings here and really
couldn’t be arsed to read any further. I did spot that one of the
guys has left and unlike many of you, I am pleased because we are
spending too much of our energy arguing when it should be spent in
pushing forward the message.

I am never afraid to give out information. I use
my first name Ampers (Taylor) – a very unusual name that can identify me
immediately to the authorities as I make no secret of my beliefs. And
my photograph as you can see is clear and makes identifying me
easier.

I appreciate that some would rather not, and that
is their privilege
, and they shouldn’t be – and weren’t
– condemned by Erik.

This entire thread was generated by a mass of
misunderstanding and should be removed.

However it cannot be removed unless we all agree –
so rather than all of us “agreeing” and causing more
needless debate, what about only those who want to keep it here
speaking up. If nobody disagrees within a month, then Erik can delete
everything that will confuse new people who become Brigade Members?
Just a thought.

  • Mon, Dec 15, 2008 - 06:21pm

    #71

    kemosavvy

    Status Bronze Member (Offline)

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    Posts: 57

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    Re: Heroes in Action: Michael Höhne

Although this thread has become more of a distraction from the purpose of the original article, or even this site for that matter. I believe this discussion has been necessary!

Are we just going to research this economic collapse for the purpose of knowing the cruise ship we are on is headed into an iceberg without coming forward, or are we researching for the purposes of persuading others to join in and warn the captain that we are headed on the wrong course.

The efforts of one person standing alone and forecasting the perils of the future is not enough (ie. peter schiff, roubini, chris martenson). We have to come together as an organization and stand together, and organize others in the cause. That’s why I distribute the DVD’s to my friends and colleagues, I will throw money in the offering plate when I can, it’s the least I can do.

You cannot organize a league of anonymous citizens. You need real people. The people coming forward right now and posting real names and real pictures are coming forward as leaders in this cause. Although Krogoth brought forth interesting analysis of the issues everyday, he will remain in the shadows of the ship and come forth once the ship has capsized and say "I told you this would happen!".

The bottom line is that this. Our current system is persuaded by money more than anything else. Think about it. He who collects the most campaign contributions wins the presidential elections in our modern society. Legislation needs the lubrication of large amounts of money to pass. Wall Street knows this, Big Oil & Energy knows this, CitiGroup definitely knows this, Environmentalists have only begun to realize this…. heck even Major League Baseball knows this. We need people like Michael Hohne or our voices will not be heard.

…my name is Steve Patterson and I live in small town Illinois.

 

  • Mon, Dec 15, 2008 - 09:10pm

    #64

    jrf29

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 18 2008

    Posts: 166

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    Re: Anonymity versus openness of identity in forums

[quote=Brainless]

In short it is very easy for someone to link your name and things you say in posts and combine that with public records like digital phonebooks. Name, age, work etc are retrieved from tens or hundreds of posts and can be used to get creditcards, hotelreservations, loans, etc.  [/quote]

Brainless, as long as we are going to be anonymous, why not be anonymous for a good reason.  The reason above doesn’t quite make sense.  If it is possible for a person’s identity (credit) to be stolen simply with a name and an address, then why would an identify thief not simply flip through the telephone book?

The following information about a person is always public:  

Full Name 

Address 

Date and place of Birth 

Occupation 

Voter registration, and political party

Marriage certificate 

Driving record 

Criminal record 

Full transcripts of court proceedings of any kind, and any financial and psychiatric records which might be attached thereto. 

Property assessment and property taxes paid

The idea that a person has a right to live anonymously in a community is a very new idea, and is at odds with centuries of tradition.  That is another reason why the federal government’s newfound secrecy is so shocking.  People discovered long ago that government functions better, when the people know exactly what it is doing, and exactly who is it doing it to.

So, to get back on topic, a name (and all of the above information) is simply not enough to steal a person’s identity.  More is needed.  If you have a social security number for a person, then you are just getting started. 

Incidentally, the entire problem of identity theft was created by, and was a byproduct of, the umpteen years of unbelievably loose credit, where credit issuers could not be bothered to check on the person asking for credit.  (Yet another symptom of a loose monetary policy.)  The credit crisis has largely put a stop to that.  And, in any event, most cases of "identity theft" are not identity theft at all, they merely involve gaining improper access to an already existing credit account and spending money (through password phishing, etc).

But let’s suppose it’s still 2006, and you want to protect your identity.  First of all, merely using your real name does not give access to enough information to steal a person’s identity.  Even with a social security number, identity theft involves making credit companies believe that you’ve moved, and then diverting correspondance to this "new" address.  Filing a "fraud alert" with any one of the credit reporting agencies will put a stop to "pre-approved" mail offers which identity thieves rely on, and also requires credit companies to contact you personally before extending new credit or accepting a "change of address" request.  Unless a thief is going so far as sneaking into your home, answering your telephone, and impersonating your voice, this will kill virtually all "identity-theft" schemes before they even get off the ground.  Nobody is going to go through all that trouble.  There are far easier trout to catch.

Think a minute about our public servents and politicians.  Most of them have their full names, home addresses, past employment, financial information, and more, available for all to see.  If that were enough to steal an identity, wouldn’t you think they’d be having problems?

Not posting your name on the internet for that reason is like removing all electricity from your house (including battery-powered flashlights) because you’re worried about an electrical fire.  Sending information such as credit card numbers, account numbers, SSN, etc by email or other electronic transmission is a terrible idea, but a name and address just isn’t enough to cook the goose!

 

 

 

 

 

  • Mon, Dec 15, 2008 - 09:48pm

    #68

    jrf29

    Status Silver Member (Offline)

    Joined: Apr 18 2008

    Posts: 166

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    Re: Anonymity versus openness of identity in forums

What the heck is going on?  The order that these posts are appearing in makes no sense at all!  Is there a bug somewhere?

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